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EUROPE: Spain Sets Up 'Bad Bank' to Buy Toxic Real Estate
by Giles TremlettThe Guardian
August 31st, 2012
Spain will inject emergency capital into the country's biggest ailing bank, Bankia, as it puts into place reforms to allow loss-making banks to receive eurozone bailout money.

GLOBAL: Revealed: Secret world of global oil and mining giants
by Nick MathiasonThe Bureau of Investigative Journalism
September 19th, 2011
Ten of the world’s most powerful oil, gas and mining companies own a staggering 6,038 subsidiaries with over a third located in ‘secrecy jurisdictions’.

LIBERIA: Hunting for Liberia’s Missing Millions
by Doreen CarvjalNew York Times
May 30th, 2010
How much money did Charles G. Taylor, the deposed president of Liberia, siphon out of his war-shattered country, and where is it? Investigators are developing a new strategy involving filing civil damage claims against companies, governments and international banks that they contend aided Mr. Taylor in illegal transactions.

KYRGYZSTAN: Kyrgyzstan investigating firms that sold fuel supplied to U.S. air base
by Walter Pincus Washington Post
May 5th, 2010
Kyrgyzstan's interim government has begun a criminal investigation of local companies that were sources of fuel supplied to the U.S. Manas air base in the Central Asian country, under Department of Defense contracts. Corruption allegations involving supplies to Manas have repeatedly surfaced in Kyrgyzstan and the United States.

AFRICA: E Guinea ejected from industry clean-up body
by Tom BurgisFinancial Times
April 16th, 2010
A pioneering initiative aimed at cleaning up the oil and mining industries has ejected Equatorial Guinea from its ranks. The board of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative, a voluntary coalition of companies, governments, donors and civil society groups, had been under pressure from activists on granting extensions to 17 states that had missed a deadline to have audits of their industries independently verified.

US: SEC charges Goldman Sachs with civil fraud in subprime deal
by Greg GordonMcClatchy Newspapers
April 16th, 2010
The Securities and Exchange Commission Friday charged Goldman Sachs & Co. and one of its executives with fraud in a risky offshore deal backed by subprime mortgages that cost investors more than $1 billion.

US: Deaths at West Virginia Mine Raise Issues About Safety
by Ian Urbina and Michael CooperNew York Times
April 6th, 2010
Rescue workers began the precarious task Tuesday of removing explosive methane gas from the coal mine where at least 25 miners died the day before. The mine owner’s -- Massey Energy Company -- dismal safety record, along with several recent evacuations of the mine, left federal officials and miners suggesting that Monday’s explosion might have been preventable.

US/KUWAIT: Settlement possible in military contractor fraud case
by Bill RankinAtlanta Journal-Constitution
January 29th, 2010
Kuwaiti firm Agility (formerly Public Warehousing) indicted here for overcharging the Army on an $8.5 billion contract is negotiating a possible settlement with the Justice Department. On Nov. 9, a federal grand jury in Atlanta indicted the firm on charges it gouged the U.S. government by overcharging on its contract to supply food to American troops in Iraq.

UK: U.K. to Crack Down on Tax Evasion in Developing Countries
by Laurence NormanWall Street Journal
January 26th, 2010
The U.K. government will on Wednesday set out proposals to broaden the crackdown on tax evasion to benefit developing countries, setting a year-end deadline for a U.K.-led multilateral tax-information-sharing accord with emerging nations. That could eventually open the way for multination tax-information accords, which would include former tax havens, developed and developing nations.

US: F.B.I. Charges Arms Sellers With Foreign Bribes
by Diana B. HenriquesNew York Times
January 20th, 2010
On Tuesday, 22 top-level arms industry executives, including a senior sales executive at Smith & Wesson, were arrested in what Justice Department officials called the first undercover sting ever aimed at violations of the federal ban on corporate bribes paid to get foreign business. The individuals are being prosecuted under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.

GHANA: Corruption probe into sale of Ghana oil block
by William Wallis, Martin Arnold and Brooke MastersFinancial Times
January 7th, 2010
US and Ghanaian authorities are investigating corruption allegations involving a Texas oil company and the local partner that helped it secure control of the Ghanaian oil block that yielded one of Africa’s biggest recent discoveries. The case risks complicating efforts by Texas company Kosmos to sell its stake in the Jubilee oil field to ExxonMobil in a deal valued at $4bn.

US: DynCorp Fires Executive Counsel
by August ColeWall Street Journal
November 28th, 2009
DynCorp International Inc. said it has terminated one of its top lawyers, a move that comes on the heels of the government contractor's disclosure that some of its subcontractors may have broken U.S. law in trying to speed up getting licenses and visas overseas.

KAZAKHSTAN: Kazakh Bank Lost Billions in Western Investments
by Landon Thomas Jr.New York Times
November 27th, 2009
In the last few years, big banks have found many surprising ways to lose billions of dollars by making loans that turned sour. But few can match the odd tale involving Kazakhstan and a little-known bank. From 2003 to 2008, Credit Suisse, Morgan Stanley, Royal Bank of Scotland, ING and others funneled more than $10 billion in loans into Bank Turalem, during the Central Asian country's boom spurred by its rich deposits of oil and natural gas. Many of these loans are now bust.

US: Ex-UBS Banker Seeks Billions for Blowing Whistle
by Lynnley BrowningNew York Times
November 26th, 2009
Bradley C. Birkenfeld was sentenced to 40 months in prison for helping rich Americans dodge their taxes, his sentence reduced in turn for informing on Swiss banking giant UBS. Now, with the help of the National Whistleblower Center, he and his lawyers hope to use a new federal whistle-blower law to claim a multibillion-dollar reward from the American government.

US/ECUADOR: New nonprofit uses Web to pressure Chevron
by David A. BakerSan Francisco Chronicle
November 16th, 2009
Retired retail executive Richard Goldman was astonished when he heard about the $27 billion pollution lawsuit against Chevron Corp. in Ecuador. SO he has created a nonprofit group, Ethos Alliance, that will use social-networking tools to spread word of the case and put pressure on Chevron.

US: E. Coli Path Shows Flaws in Beef Inspection
by Michael MossNew York Times
October 3rd, 2009
Tracing the chain of production of an E. Coli-contaminated hamburger made by Cargill, through interviews and government and corporate records obtained by The New York Times, shows why eating ground beef is still a gamble. Neither the system meant to make the meat safe, nor the meat itself, is what consumers have been led to believe.

ANGOLA: The dark side of doing business
by Rob RoseTimes South Africa
September 17th, 2009
As Angolan leader Jose Eduardo Dos Santos wooed President Jacob Zuma this week, some South African companies are furious at having been fleeced out of cash by doing business with the oil-rich country

SOUTH AMERICA: Plundering the Amazon
by Michael Smith and Adriana BrasileiroBloomberg.com
August 16th, 2009
Alcoa and Cargill have bypassed laws designed to prevent destruction of the world’s largest rain forest, Brazilian prosecutors say. The damage wrought by scores of companies is robbing the earth of its best shield against global warming.

US: DynCorp Billed U.S. $50 Million Beyond Costs in Defense Contract
by V. Dion HaynesWashington Post
August 12th, 2009
A Defense Department auditor, appearing before the Commission on Wartime Contracting in Iraq and Afghanistan, testified Tuesday that DynCorp International billed the government $50 million more than the amount specified in a contract to provide dining facilities and living quarters for military personnel in Kuwait.

FRANCE: In French Inquiry, a Glimpse at Corporate Spying
by DAVID JOLLYNew York Times
August 1st, 2009
A corporate espionage case unfolding in France involves some of the biggest French companies, including Électricité de France, the world’s largest operator of nuclear power plants, and Vivendi, the media and telecommunications conglomerate. The story has the elements of a corporate thriller: a cast of characters that includes former French spies and military men, an American cycling champion, Greenpeace activists and a dogged judge.

US: Cuomo Says Schwab Faces Fraud Suit
by Liz RappaportWall Street Journal
July 20th, 2009
New York Attorney General Andrew Cuomo has warned Charles Schwab & Co. that his office plans to sue the firm for civil fraud over its marketing and sales of auction-rate securities to clients. Emails and testimony cited in the letter show Schwab's brokers had little idea of what they were selling and later failed to tell clients that the market was collapsing.

US: Madoff Is Sentenced to 150 Years for Ponzi Scheme
by Diana B. HenriquesNew York Times
June 29th, 2009
A criminal saga that began in December with a string of superlatives — the largest, longest and most widespread Ponzi scheme in history — ended the same way on Monday as Bernard L. Madoff was sentenced to 150 years in prison, the maximum for his crimes.

AFRICA: Blood diamond scheme 'is failing'
BBC News
June 24th, 2009
Officials are meeting to review the Kimberley Process, amid criticism that the scheme, set up to certify the origin of diamonds to assure consumers that by purchasing diamonds they are not financing war and human rights abuses, is failing. The Kimberley Process emerged from global outrage over conflicts in countries like Liberia and Sierra Leone, largely funded by the plundering of diamond resources.

US: Madoff Suits Add Details About Fraud
by Diana B. HenriquesNew York Times
June 22nd, 2009
Three lawsuits filed on Monday provided new details about what regulators say went on inside Bernard L. Madoff’s long-running Ponzi scheme, including information about who might have helped perpetuate the fraud for so long.

US/ANTIGUA: Texas Financier and Antiguan Official Charged With Fraud
by Clifford Krauss New York Times
June 19th, 2009
A U.S. Justice Department indictment unsealed Friday accused R. Allen Stanford of Stanford International Bank, based in the Caribbean money haven of Antigua, of operating a multibillion-dollar Ponzi scheme with the help of Antigua’s top banking regulator, Leroy King.

AFRICA: Battle to Halt Graft Scourge in Africa Ebbs
by Celia W. DuggerNew York Times
June 9th, 2009
The fight against corruption in Africa is faltering as public agencies investigating wrongdoing by powerful politicians have been undermined and officials leading the charge have been dismissed, subjected to death threats and driven into exile. The search is on for more effective ways to tackle corruption, including intensified legal efforts to prosecute multinational corporations that pay the bribes and reclaim loot that African political elites have stashed abroad.

US: U.S. Cracks Down on Corporate Bribes
by DIONNE SEARCEYWall Street Journal
May 26th, 2009
The Justice Department is increasing its prosecutions of alleged acts of foreign bribery by U.S. corporations, forcing them to take costly steps to defend against scrutiny. The crackdown under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, or FCPA -- a post-Watergate law largely dormant for decades -- now extends across five continents and penetrates entire industries.

WORLD: When Chevron Hires Ex-Reporter to Investigate Pollution, Chevron Looks Good
by Brian StelterNew York Times
May 10th, 2009
When Chevron learned that “60 Minutes” was preparing a potentially damaging report about oil company contamination of the Amazon rain forest in Ecuador, it hired a former journalist to produce a mirror image of the report, from the corporation’s point of view. An Ecuadorean judge is expected to rule soon on whether Chevron owes up to $27 billion in damages.

US: Trustee Sues Madoff Hedge Fund Investor
by Diana B. HenriquesNew York Times
May 7th, 2009
The trustee gathering assets for the victims of Bernard L. Madoff’s fraud has sued a prominent New York City hedge fund investor, J. Ezra Merkin, to recover almost $500 million withdrawn from Madoff accounts in the last six years.

NIGERIA: A Writer’s Violent End, and His Activist Legacy
by Patricia CohenNew York Times
May 4th, 2009
A new novel, "Eclipse," by Richard North Patterson, is based on the case of the Nigerian writer and activist Ken Saro-Wiwa, executed in November 1995 by the government of General Sani Abacha. The circumstances, along with related incidents of brutal attacks, are getting another hearing. This month the Wiwa family’s lawsuit against Royal Dutch Shell over its role in those events goes to trial in federal court in Manhattan.

US: Undisclosed Losses at Merrill Lynch Lead to a Trading Inquiry
by Louise Story and Eric DashNew York Times
March 6th, 2009
Bank of America chief executive, Kenneth D. Lewis, is trying to bridle Merrill Lynch traders, whose rush into risky investments nearly brought down the brokerage firm. But questions over the Merrill losses — in particular, who knew about them, and when — keep swirling.

INDIA: Pricewaterhouse Revamps Indian Unit
by Heather TimmonsNew York Times
March 5th, 2009
The auditor PricewaterhouseCoopers is overhauling its operations in India two months after starting an investigation into fraud at Satyam Computer Services, a software and outsourcing firm whose chairman said in January that he had falsely claimed assets of $1 billion in cash and overstated operating margins.

US: Ex-Leaders at Countrywide Start Firm to Buy Bad Loans
by Eric LiptonNew York Times
March 3rd, 2009
Countrywide Financial made risky loans to tens of thousands of Americans, helping set off a chain of events that has the economy staggering. So it may come as a surprise that a dozen former top Countrywide executives now stand to make millions from the home mortgage mess, buying up delinquent home mortgages that the government took over, sometimes for pennies on the dollar, at newly-formed PennyMac.

CHINA: Morgan Stanley’s Chinese Land Scandal
by David Barboza New York Times
March 1st, 2009
In a Securities and Exchange Commission filing, Morgan Stanley said it had fired an executive in its China real estate division after uncovering evidence that he might have violated the United States Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, which bars American business people from bribing foreign officials.

SWITZERLAND: UBS Names Grübel as New CEO
by Carrick MollenkampWall Street Journal
February 26th, 2009
UBS AG, the Swiss bank battered by massive write-downs and its role in a U.S. tax-evasion scheme, announced the surprise departure of chief executive Marcel Rohner. Mr. Rohner's sudden departure comes after UBS agreed earlier this month to a $780 million settlement with the U.S. Justice Department of a criminal inquiry into the bank's role in the tax evasion.

MEXICO: U.S. Is Arms Bazaar for Mexican Cartels
by James C. McKinley, Jr.New York Times
February 25th, 2009
Phoenix-based gun dealer George Iknadosian of X-Calibur Guns will go on trial on charges he sold hundreds of weapons, mostly AK-47 rifles, to smugglers, knowing they would go to a drug cartel in the western state of Sinaloa. The guns helped fuel the gang warfare in which more than 6,000 Mexicans died last year.

INDIA: Bail Opposed for Raju
by Eric Bellman and Jackie RangeWall Street Journal
January 28th, 2009
Prosecutors pursuing the fraud at Satyam Computer Services Ltd. said Tuesday the Indian technology outsourcer's founder, B. Ramalinga Raju, should be denied bail because he could slow the investigation if released.

US: Bank of America Board Under Gun From Critics
by Louise Story and Julie CreswellNew York Times
January 27th, 2009
As Bank of America's board meets next week, shareholders have turned up the pressure on CEO Kenneth D. Lewis. Their scrutiny has also turned an unusual spotlight on the oversight role played by the bank's board members.

US: Troubled Times Bring Mini-Madoffs to Light
by Leslie WayneNew York Times
January 27th, 2009
In the wake of the Bernard Madoff Ponzi scheme scandal, the SEC has brought cases involving losses of over $200 million since the beginning of October last year, including one against the disgraced Democratic donor Norman Hsu and North Carolina-based Biltmore Financial.

INDIA: Indian Outsourcing Giant Admits Fraud
by Rama LakshmiWashington Post
January 7th, 2009
The leader of one of India's largest technology outsourcing companies, Satyam Computer Services, on Wednesday admitted cooking its books and committing other grave financial wrongdoing to inflate profits over several years. The revelation shook India's stock market and sent shockwaves across the country's booming software industry.

US: Madoff Case Faces Crucial Disclosure Deadline
by Diana B. HenriquesNew York Times
December 30th, 2008
Judge Louis L. Stanton of United States District Court has established Wednesday as the deadline for Bernard L. Madoff, who is accused of operating a $50 billion Ponzi scheme, to provide federal securities regulators with a full accounting of his and his New York firm’s assets — from real estate to art works to bank accounts.

TANZANIA: Villagers storm Barrick gold mine: Inflict much damage, FFU police deployed to disperse them
This Day (Tanzania)
December 13th, 2008
Thousands of villagers raided the North Mara gold mine owned by Barrick Gold Corp on Thursday night and caused damage to various mining equipments worth more than $16 million (approx. 21bn/-).

US: Bank of America Acquires Culture of Corruption in Merrill Lynch Purchase, Warns Former Merrill Star Player
Market Watch
October 21st, 2008
Keith Schooley, a former star financial consultant with Merrill Lynch, warns Bank of America CEO Kenneth Lewis that he may soon experience buyer's remorse over his acquisition of Wall Street's fallen idol.

UK: Britain's failure to tackle corruption damned amid new claims against BAE
by David LeighThe Guardian (UK)
October 18th, 2008
• Arms giant accused of fraud over Saudi deals • International monitors put UK ministers in dock

U.S.: Great Place for the Oil Business
by Stephen LeahyInter Press News Service (IPS)
September 30th, 2008
Why do U.S. oil companies -- some of the most profitable corporations on the planet -- receive 20 to 40 billion dollars a year in subsidies from the U.S. government?

US: Foggo pleads guilty in Wilkes case: Former CIA official fraudulently sent contracts to friend
by Paul M. KrawzakSan Diego Union Tribune – Washington Bureau
September 30th, 2008
Kyle “Dusty” Foggo, the former No. 3 official in the CIA, pleaded guilty yesterday to fraudulently steering intelligence contracts to his lifelong friend, former Poway defense contractor Brent Wilkes.

MALAYSIA: Murum Dam - Public Funds for Corporate Profit?
by Anil NettoInter Press Service (IPS)
September 27th, 2008
Who will foot the bill for the Murum resettlement? ''Is it Sarawak Energy or will it be passed on directly to the state government and hence the tax payer,'' asked one Sarawak-based activist, who declined to be identified.

WORLD: Oil Companies' "Self-Policing" a Dismal Failure
by Alison RaphaelInter Press News Service (IPS)
September 24th, 2008
The intersection of human rights, the environment and corporate responsibility was highlighted today at a Capitol Hill hearing featuring activists from Burma and Nigeria who underlined the failure to date of "voluntary" controls over major oil companies operating in their countries.

US: Reddy Ice Names Operating Chief, Puts Sales Executive on Leave
by SHIRLEEN DORMANWall Street Journal
September 15th, 2008
Reddy Ice Holdings Inc. has suspended its quarterly dividend, named a new operating chief and put its sales chief on paid leave after finding he violated company policies and is associated with "matters that are under investigation."

US: Federal Oil Officials Accused In Sex and Drugs Scandal
by STEPHEN POWERWall Street Journal
September 11th, 2008
Employees of the federal agency that last year collected more than $11 billion in royalties from oil and gas companies broke government rules and created a "culture of ethical failure" by allegedly accepting gifts from and having sex with industry representatives, the Interior Department's top watchdog said Wednesday.

US: Files Show Governor Intervened With Court
by Ian UrbinaNew York Times
August 13th, 2008
West Virginia Governor Joe Manchin III filed a friend-of-the-court brief in June, arguing the State Supreme Court should review a $382 million judgment against DuPont. The case involves thousands of residents in the area of a DuPont-operated zinc-smelting plant, and the largest civil penalty ever levied against the company, for the dumping of toxic arsenic, cadmium and lead at the plant.

UK-Zimbabwe: BAE linked to Zimbabwean arms dealer
by Christopher Thompson and Michael Peel Financial Times/UK
July 31st, 2008
According to documents seen by the Financial Times, BAE Systems has been linked to Zimbabwean arms trader John Bredenkamp. BAE reportedly paid at least Ł20m to Bredenkamp via offshore entities in the British Virgin Islands between 2003 and 2005. The payments raise fresh questions about bribery in BAE's dealings.

UK: Law lords: fraud office right to end bribery investigation in BAE case
by David LeighThe Guardian
July 31st, 2008
England's House of Lords ruled that the Serious Fraud Office was lawful in its actions to halt investigations into allegations that BAE Systems ran a Ł60m "slush fund" and offered sweeteners to officials from Saudi Arabia in return for lucrative contracts.

US: Art Auctions on Cruise Ships Lead to Anger, Accusations and Lawsuits
by JORI FINKELThe New York Times
July 16th, 2008
While overcharging for a product is not in itself illegal, misrepresenting the goods sold can be. The plaintiffs’ central argument hinges on Park West’s description of its appraisals.

INDIA: Decades Later, Toxic Sludge Torments Bhopal
by Somini SenguptaNew York Times
July 7th, 2008
Residents of Bhopal, India continue to suffer from Union Carbide's toxic legacy, this time in the form of toxic waste that still languishes inside a shoddy warehouse on the old factory grounds. Ailments such as cleft palates and mental retardation are appearing in numbers of Bhopali children, raising questions about contaminated soil and groundwater, clean-up, and liability.

Iraq: U.S. Advised Iraqi Ministry on Oil Deals
by Andrew E. KramerNew York Times
June 30th, 2008
The Bush administration has disclosed that U.S. advisors in Iraq played a key role in drawing up contracts between the Iraqi government and five major Western oil companies. The no-bid contracts are expected to be awarded Monday to Exxon Mobil, Shell, BP, Total and Chevron, as well as to several smaller oil companies.

SWITZERLAND: Tax scandal leaves Swiss giant reeling
by Nick MathiasonThe Guardian (UK)
June 29th, 2008
Sending shockwaves through the Swiss financial industry, banking giant UBS is facing accusations from a former senior banker in US courts of massive fraud and corruption. UBS is alleged to have engaged in routine activities aimed at helping its high net worth clients evade hundreds of millions of dollars in taxes, among other matters.

US: Put oil firm chiefs on trial, says leading climate change scientist
by Ed PilkingtonGuardian (UK)
June 23rd, 2008
On June 23, James Hansen, a leading world climate scientist, called for the executives of major fossil fuel companies, including ExxonMobil and Peabody Energy, to be put on trial for crimes against humanity and nature through actions like funding climate skeptics to undermine global consensus around combating climate change.

US: Guilty Plea by Ex-Banker Likely to Aid Probe of UBS
by Evan Perez The Wall Street Journal
June 20th, 2008
A former banker at UBS AG pleaded guilty in federal court to helping a billionaire client evade taxes by hiding $200 million in assets in offshore accounts, in a move expected to aid U.S. prosecutors in their probe of the Swiss banking giant.

US: Prosecutors Build Bear Stearns Case on E-Mails
by LANDON THOMAS Jr.The New York Times
June 20th, 2008
The two men, who were forced out of their jobs last year, are the first senior executives from Wall Street investment banks to face criminal charges stemming from the credit mess, and the investigation by federal prosecutors based in Brooklyn is likely to become a test case of the government’s ability to make successful prosecutions of arcane financial transactions.

KATRINA: Audit Faults KBR's Repairs of Hurricane Damage
by Derek KravitzThe Washington Post
June 18th, 2008
Efforts by defense contractor KBR to repair hurricane-damaged Navy facilities were deemed shoddy and substandard, and one technical adviser alleged that the federal government "certainly paid twice" for many KBR projects because of "design and workmanship deficiencies," the Pentagon's inspector general reported in an audit released yesterday.

US: Army Overseer Tells of Ouster Over KBR Stir
by James RisenNew York Times
June 17th, 2008
Charles M. Smith, the senior civilian overseeing the multibillion-dollar contract with KBR during the first two years of the war, says he was ousted for refusing to approve payment for more than $1 billion in questionable charges to KBR. The Pentagon has recently awarded KBR part of a 10-year, $150 billion contract in Iraq.

US: Big Penalty Set for Law Firm, but Not a Trial
by Jonathan D. GlaterNew York Times
June 17th, 2008
The law firm formerly known as Milberg Weiss Bershad Hynes & Lerach agreed on Monday to pay $75 million to dodge a criminal trial. Misconduct at the firm has severely tarnished the reputation of lawyers representing shareholder claims against corporate corruption.

IRAQ: BBC uncovers lost Iraq billions
by Jane Corbin BBC News
June 10th, 2008
A BBC investigation estimates that around $23bn (Ł11.75bn) may have been lost, stolen or just not properly accounted for in Iraq.

US: From a Whistle-Blower to a Target
by TIM ARANGOThe New York Times
June 9th, 2008
Mr. Ripp's journey from whistle-blower to defendant is another example of the long shadow cast by the AOL-Time Warner merger, now widely regarded as one of the most disastrous corporate marriages in history. It is also a cautionary tale for corporate executives who may illuminate fraudulent conduct to one government agency but then find themselves a target of another.

US: Researchers Fail to Reveal Full Drug Pay
by GARDINER HARRIS and BENEDICT CAREYThe New York Times
June 8th, 2008
A world-renowned Harvard child psychiatrist whose work has helped fuel an explosion in the use of powerful antipsychotic medicines in children earned at least $1.6 million in consulting fees from drug makers from 2000 to 2007 but for years did not report much of this income to university officials, according to information given Congressional investigators.

US: Concrete contractor cuts deal with prosecutors
by Jaxon Van DerbekenSan Francisco Chronicle
June 1st, 2008
Substandard concrete from Ramirez's now-defunct company was poured into a half-mile stretch of the Bay Bridge's rebuilt western approach. Inferior, less-durable material also was used on a retrofit project at the Golden Gate Bridge, a wastewater treatment plant in Burlingame, the new parking garage in Golden Gate Park, the Municipal Railway's Third Street light-rail line and other projects.

FRANCE: Ex-EADS chief charged in French probe
by INGRID ROUSSEAUAssociated Press
May 30th, 2008
A former co-CEO of Airbus parent company EADS, Noel Forgeard, was hit with preliminary insider trading charges Friday in an extensive probe into stock sales by more than a dozen former and current executives at the European planemaker.

BRAZIL: Businessman alleges Alstom paid bribes for Brazil project: report
AFP
May 29th, 2008
French engineering group Alstom allegedly paid nearly a million dollars in bribes in connection with a Brazilian energy plant, testimony from a Brazilian businessman reported in the press here said Thursday.

US: Judge Finds Dell Engaged In Deceptive Practices
by CHAD BRAYThe Wall Street Journal
May 27th, 2008
A state judge in Albany has found that Dell Inc. and its financing unit engaged in deceptive business practices related to financing promotions for its computers and technical support, New York Attorney General Andrew Cuomo said Tuesday.

GERMANY: Ex-Manager Tells of Bribery at Siemens
by CARTER DOUGHERTYThe New York Times
May 27th, 2008
A former manager of Siemens, the European engineering company, testified Monday about an intricate system of slush funds and bribery at the company as the first trial on allegations of corporate corruption in Germany began.

GERMANY: Phone Giant in Germany Stirs a Furor
by MARK LANDLERThe New York Times
May 27th, 2008
Germany was engulfed in a national furor over threats to privacy on Monday, after an admission by Deutsche Telekom that it had surreptitiously tracked thousands of phone calls to identify the source of leaks to the news media about its internal affairs.

US: Medtronic Settles a Civil Lawsuit on Allegations of Medicare Fraud
by MARY WILLIAMS WALSHThe New York Times
May 23rd, 2008
A unit of Medtronic defrauded Medicare of hundreds of millions of dollars, according to a civil lawsuit that was unsealed Thursday and simultaneously settled with the Justice Department.

US: Eight ex-AOL executives charged with fraud
by Joanna Chung in New York and Richard Waters in San FranciscoThe Financial Times
May 20th, 2008
US regulators on Monday announced fraud charges stemming indirectly from the merger of Time Warner and AOL, the largest union in US corporate history and a symbol of the dotcom boom and bust of the early part of this decade.

US: BAE chief detained as US turns up heat in bribes case
by Nick Clark and Stephen FoleyThe Independent (U.K.)
May 19th, 2008
BAE Systems admitted yesterday that American authorities investigating corruption claims over an arms deal with Saudi Arabia had issued a series of subpoenas to senior executives, as the investigation continues to gather pace. Two bosses of the defence giant were also detained after they landed at a Houston airport last week

RUSSIA: As Gazprom Goes, So Goes Russia
by Andrew E. KramerNew York Times
May 11th, 2008
Gazprom and the Russian government have long had a close relationship, but the revolving door between them is spinning especially fast this year. But Gazprom also epitomizes the risks of state capitalism: waste and inefficiency.

UK:British MEPs took gifts from firms they are meant to regulate
by Andy Rowell The Independent
May 11th, 2008
Members of the European Parliament are routinely accepting gifts, wages and hospitality from companies they are charged with regulating.

NIGERIA: Ex-Halliburton unit in bribery probe
by Michael Peel in London and Matthew Green in LagosThe Financial Times
May 9th, 2008
US anti-bribery investigators are targeting a former Halliburton subsidiary over its work on a key Royal Dutch Shell project in Nigeria, widening a corruption probe into the country’s troubled oil industry.

MEXICO: Pemex Oozes Corruption
by Diego Cevallos IPS
May 7th, 2008
Funds belonging to the Mexican state oil monopoly, Pemex, have paid in recent years for liposuction treatment for the wife of the company's chief executive, a presidential candidate's campaign, contracts with firms facing legal action, and the whims of trade union leaders who are not required to account for their expenses.

FRANCE: Prosecutors probe Alstom for contract corruption
AFP
May 6th, 2008
French prosecutors suspect engineering giant Alstom, builder of power stations and high-speed trains, of bribing foreign officials to win contracts, a judicial source said Tuesday.

TANZANIA: Norweigian firm pulls out over graft
by Tom MosobaThe Citizen (Tanzania)
May 6th, 2008
The firm, Norconsult AS, announced on Sunday that it was winding up all its operations in Tanzania and terminating the employment of its managing director after audit reports linked it to corruption.

UK: Retailers in tobacco price probe
BBC NEWS
April 25th, 2008
n the case of Gallaher, Imperial Tobacco, Asda, Sainsbury, Shell, Somerfield and Tesco, there was an indirect exchange of proposed future retail prices between competitors, it adds, allegedly between 2001 and 2003.

SOUTH KOREA: Indicted Samsung Chairman Resigns
by Blaine HardenWashington Post Foreign Service
April 22nd, 2008
The Lee family, for all its public-relations woes and legal entanglements, remains the dominant shareholder in Samsung, the jewel in South Korea's conglomerate crown.

US: Report Finds Air Force Officers Steered Contract
by Josh WhiteWashington Post
April 18th, 2008
It was during that meeting in November 2005, according to the 251-page report, obtained by The Washington Post, that a controversial $50 million contract was awarded to a company that barely existed in an effort to reward a recently retired four-star general and a millionaire civilian pilot who had grown close to senior Air Force officials and the Thunderbirds.

US: Washington Blocks Exports of Munitions Firm Suspected of Fraud
by C. J. CHIVERSNew York Times
April 4th, 2008
The U.S. State Department on Thursday suspended the international export activities of AEY Inc., a Miami Beach arms-dealing company led by a 22-year-old man whose munitions procurements for the Pentagon are under criminal investigation.

US: Alcoa lawsuit halted so federal criminal probe can continue
by Associated PressInternational Herald Tribune
March 28th, 2008
A civil lawsuit accusing Alcoa Inc. and affiliates of bribing officials in the Persian Gulf state of Bahrain will be temporarily halted so that U.S. investigators can conduct a criminal investigation of the aluminum maker.

EUROPE: In Europe, widening probe targets tax haven
by Mark Rice Oxley and Jeffrey WhiteChristian Science Monitor
March 25th, 2008
Nearly two decades after taking the helm of Deutsche Post, Klaus Zumwinkel surrendered to police amid suspicion that he evaded €1 million in taxes. The next day, he resigned, becoming the first to fall in a massive probe that has broadened to nine other countries.

GERMANY: Germans sour on capitalism amid corporate scandals
by Jeffrey WhiteChristian Science Monitor
March 25th, 2008
Recent scandals, involving such titans as Siemens, Volkswagen and Deutsche Poste, have undermined public trust in the integrity of German corporations, bolstering a growing shift to the left and its social welfare ideals.

US: Class-Action King Weiss to Plead Guilty to Conspiracy
by Nathan KoppelWall Street Journal
March 21st, 2008
Melvyn Weiss, whose law firm, Milberg LLP, built a reputation and fortune filing class-action securities fraud lawsuits against corporations including Tyco International and Enron, agreed to plead guilty in a case alleging improper kickbacks to clients.

US: Fidelity Settles After Employees Accepted Gifts
by Carrie JohnsonThe Washington Post
March 6th, 2008
Mutual fund manager Fidelity Investments yesterday settled allegations that more than a dozen of its current and former employees, including star executive Peter Lynch, accepted such perks as sports tickets, tropical vacations and a $160,000 bachelor party from brokers seeking to win business.

US: Alcoa Faces Allegation By Bahrain of Bribery
by GLENN R. SIMPSONThe Wall Street Journal
February 28th, 2008
A company controlled by the Persian Gulf state of Bahrain accused Alcoa Corp. of a 15-year conspiracy involving overcharging, fraud and bribery.

FRANCE: Sarkozy calls on head of Sociéte Générale to resign over trading scandal
by Katrin BennholdInternational Herald Tribune
February 26th, 2008
President Nicolas Sarkozy of France called on the head of Sociéte Générale to resign over a €4.9 billion trading fraud, saying, "That someone earns €7 million doesn't shock me. On one condition: that he takes responsibility."

US: Inside the world of war profiteers
by David Jackson and Jason Grotto|Tribune reportersChicago Tribune
February 21st, 2008
Hundreds of pages of recently unsealed court records detail how kickbacks shaped the war's largest troop support contract months before the first wave of U.S. soldiers plunged their boots into Iraqi sand.

US: 12 Years for Contractor in Bribery Case
by ELLIOT SPAGATAP
February 20th, 2008
A defense contractor was sentenced to 12 years in federal prison Tuesday for bribing former Rep. Randy "Duke" Cunningham with cash, trips, the services of prostitutes and other gifts in exchange for nearly $90 million in Pentagon work.

UK: BAE: secret papers reveal threats from Saudi prince
by David Leigh and Rob EvansThe Guardian (UK)
February 15th, 2008
Prince Bandar, the head of the Saudi national security council, and son of the crown prince, was alleged in court to be the man behind the threats to hold back information about suicide bombers and terrorists. He faces accusations that he himself took more than Ł1bn in secret payments from the arms company BAE.

GERMANY: Authorities Investigating Deutsche Post CEO for Tax Evasion
by Barbara SchmidDer Spiegel
February 14th, 2008
Klaus Zumwinkel, the CEO of former German postal monopoly Deutsche Post, is under investigation for tax evasion.

US: Hewlett-Packard Settles Spying Case
by MATT RICHTELThe New York Times
February 14th, 2008
Hewlett-Packard has agreed to a financial settlement with The New York Times and three BusinessWeek magazine journalists in connection with the company’s spying scandal that stemmed from surreptitiously obtaining private phone records.

US: Bush Presses House to Approve Bill on Surveillance
by ERIC LICHTBLAUThe New York Times
February 13th, 2008
The president’s remarks came the morning after the Senate handed the White House a major victory by voting to broaden the government’s spy powers and to give legal protection to phone companies that cooperated in President Bush’s program of eavesdropping without warrants.

US: Committee Investigates Ad Tactics for Lipitor
by Stephanie SaulNew York Times
February 8th, 2008
A Congressional investigation revealed that Pfizer agreed to pay Dr. Jarvik $1,350,000 as a celebrity pitchman for the heart drug Lipitor, and wants to know how much stunt doubles in the ads may have also been paid.

US: An Ex-President, a Mining Deal and a Big Donor
by JO BECKER and DON VAN NATTA Jr.The New York Times
January 31st, 2008
Unlike more established competitors, Mr. Giustra was a newcomer to uranium mining in Kazakhstan, a former Soviet republic. But what his fledgling company lacked in experience, it made up for in connections. Accompanying Mr. Giustra on his luxuriously appointed MD-87 jet that day was a former president of the United States, Bill Clinton.

CHINA: Tainted Drugs Tied to Maker of Abortion Pill
by JAKE HOOKER and WALT BOGDANICHThe New York Times
January 31st, 2008
A huge state-owned Chinese pharmaceutical company that exports to dozens of countries, including the United States, is at the center of a nationwide drug scandal after nearly 200 Chinese cancer patients were paralyzed or otherwise harmed last summer by contaminated leukemia drugs.

US: Contractor Abuses Rarely Punished, Groups Say
by Ali GharibIPS
January 21st, 2008
Out of the dozens upon dozens of reports of abuses by private contractors as part of the U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, only one prosecution of a contractor has taken place.

US: Duke Energy sued for alleged kickbacks
New Mexico Business Weekly
January 17th, 2008
Two lawyers have filed a class-action lawsuit in federal court in Cincinnati accusing Duke Energy Corp. of overcharging tens of thousands of residential and business customers.

US: Corporate Fraud Lawsuits Restricted
by Robert Barnes and Carrie JohnsonWashington Post
January 16th, 2008
The Supreme Court yesterday strictly limited the ability of investors who lost money through corporate fraud to sue other businesses that may have helped facilitate the crime, a decision that could doom stockholder efforts to recover billions of dollars lost in Enron and other high-profile cases.

JAPAN: Yamada gave additional 400,000 dollars to organization
Yomiuri Shimbun
January 8th, 2008
Defense contractor Yamada Corp. provided a total of 400,000 dollars in consultant fees to an executive director of a Japan-U.S. exchange organization between 2003 and 2005.

KUWAIT: How Iraq Conflict Rewards A Kuwaiti Merchant Family
by CAM SIMPSON and GLENN R. SIMPSONWall Street Journal
December 17th, 2007
Federal prosecutors in Atlanta are looking into whether Public Warehousing and another family-dominated company, Sultan Center Food Products Co., colluded to gouge the U.S. military.

US: Black Given Prison Term Over Fraud
by Tim ArangoNew York Times
December 11th, 2007
Conrad M. Black is handed down a 6 1/2 year prison sentence for removing 13 boxes of documents from the office of his media company, Hollinter International.

NIGERIA: Nigeria suspends Siemens dealings
BBC News
December 11th, 2007
Nigeria has cancelled a contract with Siemens and suspended dealings with the German telecoms firm pending an investigation into bribery allegations.

SOUTH KOREA: Tired of Corruption but Afraid of the Crackdown
by Choe Sang-HunNew York Times
December 4th, 2007
Manufacturing giant Samsung faces accusations of corruption.

US: Life Was Lost in Maelstrom of Suspicion
by Ginger Thompson and Eric SchmittNew York Times
December 4th, 2007
The suicide of a top Air Force procurement officer casts a cloud of suspicion, threatening to plunge a service still struggling to emerge from one of its worst scandals into another quagmire.

IVORY COAST: The Bitter Taste of Cocoa in Côte d'Ivoire
by Michael DeibertIPS News
December 3rd, 2007
In addition to funding conflict, cocoa revenues are believed to have been defrauded for enrichment of persons in both the government and rebel camps. Article also mentions the following corporations: Lev-Ci and Cargill.

US: Law firm seeks nearly $700 mil for Enron pacts
by Martha GraybowReuters
November 21st, 2007
The law firm that helped win $7.2 billion in settlements for Enron investors is seeking nearly $700 million in legal fees for itself and other attorneys who handled the case, according to court documents.

DRC: Six arrested in Congo radioactive dumping scandal
by Joe BavierReuters
November 10th, 2007
Congolese authorities arrested six people in connection with the dumping of tonnes of highly radioactive minerals into a river near the southeastern town of Likasi. A report said some 17 tons of the minerals confiscated were destined for Chinese firm Magma.

US: Energy Dept. Audit Finds Overcharges On Contracts Alleged 'Padding' By KBR Affiliate
by Dana HedgpethWashington Post
October 30th, 2007
Energy Dept. Audit Finds Overcharges On Contracts Alleged 'Padding' By KBR Affiliate

UK: From $1 firm, Lord Ashcroft nets Ł132m
by Simon BowersGuardian (UK)
October 9th, 2007
The UK's Lord Ashcroft, the Conservative party deputy chairman and major donor, has agreed to sell his loss-making US janitorial business in a deal that will bring him a Ł132m windfall.

GERMANY:Siemens Settlement Sets Off Criticism of German Inquiries
by David Crawford and Mike EsterlWall Street Journal
October 8th, 2007
In the wake of a settlement between Siemens AG and German authorities over one aspect of a bribes-for-business scandal, critics are saying the sanction is light given the scale of the alleged crime and reflects how difficult it is for local law enforcement to pursue corporate corruption.

BURMA: Criticism of Total Operations Grows
by Michael DiebertIPS
October 4th, 2007
The Yadana natural gas pipeline runs through the heart of the debate on corporate responsibility as to how foreign businesses should operate in a country ruled by a military dictatorship accused of widespread human rights abuses and violent suppression of dissent within its borders.

CONGO: World Bank accused of razing Congo forests
by John VidalThe Guardian (UK)
October 4th, 2007
The World Bank encouraged foreign companies to destructively log the world's second largest forest, endangering the lives of thousands of Congolese Pygmies, according to a report on an internal investigation by senior bank staff and outside experts.

US: Billions over Baghdad; The Spoils of War
by Donald L. Barlett and James B. SteeleVanity Fair
October 1st, 2007
Between April 2003 and June 2004, $12 billion in U.S. currency--much of it belonging to the Iraqi people--was shipped from the Federal Reserve to Baghdad, where it was dispensed by the Coalition Provisional Authority. Incredibly, at least $9 billion has gone missing, unaccounted for, in a frenzy of mismanagement and greed.

RUSSIA: Energomash Says It Was Asked for $10M Bribe
by Anatoly MedetskyMoscow Times
September 28th, 2007
Engineering company NPO Energomash reports that it was approached for a large bribe to reinstate its export license.

FRANCE: Total: No Capital Expenditures in Myanmar
Associated Press
September 27th, 2007
Total SA, reacting Thursday to comments by French President Sarkozy urging the oil and gas giant to refrain from new investment in Myanmar, said it had not made any capital expenditure there since 1998. The military junta that rules Myanmar this week escalated its efforts to repress pro-democracy demonstrations led by thousands of Buddhist monks.

US: Software maker admits to taking bribes
by Stephanie KirchgaessnerFinancial Times
September 25th, 2007
An oil and gas services company owned by a US buy-out firm on Monday admitted it sought to bribe officials connected to several nationally owned oil companies to improve sales of its software, including Kazakhstan’s KazMunaiGas and subsidiaries of China’s CNOOC.

US: Head of firm paid to track Iraq spending investigated
by Matt KelleyUSA Today
September 21st, 2007
The head of a firm hired to audit Iraqi reconstruction spending is under investigation for violation of conflict of interest laws.

US: BAE faces class-action suit in America
by Josephine MouldsThe Daily Telegraph (UK)
September 21st, 2007
BAE Systems is facing a class-action lawsuit in the US related to alleged bribery, which could lift the lid on the inner workings of the defence company.

US: Embattled Siemens hires general counsel
by Simon ThielBloomberg News
September 20th, 2007
In an attempt to tighten controls and improve its image following a bribery investigation that began last year, a German engineering company appoints new board members and senior managers.

US: US accountants charged in probe
BBC News Online
September 14th, 2007
US financial regulators have charged 69 firms for breaking new corporate laws brought in after a wave of scandals.

CANADA: Four Former Nortel Executives Charged With Accounting Fraud
Associated Press
September 13th, 2007
The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has charged four more former Nortel Networks Corp. executives with accounting fraud, alleging they manipulated reserves to change Nortel's earnings statements on the orders of more senior officers of the Canadian networking equipment maker.

US: '60s Figure Says He Financed Donor Hsu
by Ianthe Jeanne Dugan and Brody MullinsWall Street Journal
September 12th, 2007
A company controlled by Democratic Party donor Norman Hsu recently received $40 million from a Madison Avenue investment fund run by Joel Rosenman, who was one of the creators of the Woodstock rock festival in 1969. That money, Mr. Rosenman told investors this week, is missing.

US: Whistle-blowers remain in the line of fire
by Jeremy GrantFinancial Times
September 12th, 2007
When the Securities and Exchange Commission came under congressional fire this year for its handling of an insider trading probe into hedge fund Pequot Capital, Senator Charles Grassley said the episode showed that whistle-blowers were "as welcome as a skunk at a picnic".

CHILE: Pascua Lama payoff disputed by Chile locals
by Trey PollardSantiago Times/El Mercurio
September 11th, 2007
Huasco Valley property owners who live below the Pascua Lama gold mine and administer US$3 million yearly in “hush” money given them by mine owner Barrick Gold charged this weekend that their predecessors used Barrick’s money for personal gain.

UK: Three 'face jail' over Ikea deals
BBC News Online
September 7th, 2007
A supplier and two employees of the furniture giant Ikea have admitted to using bribes in purchasing deals.

SOUTH KOREA: Hyundai Motor, affiliates hit with 63 billion won fine for unfair business
by Tony ChangYonhap News Service
September 6th, 2007
South Korea's corporate watchdog said Thursday that it fined Hyundai Motor Co., the country's No. 1 automaker, and its four affiliates more than 60 billion won (US$63.9 million) for 'unfairly' supporting other units.

US: Army to examine Iraq contracts
by Richard LardnerAssociated Press
August 29th, 2007
The Army will examine as many as 18,000 contracts awarded over the past four years to support U.S. forces in Iraq to determine how many are tainted by waste, fraud and abuse.

UK: British firm under scrutiny for export of Bosnian guns to Iraq
by Jamie Doward and Johnny McDevittThe Observer (UK)
August 13th, 2007
MPs and Amnesty International demand to know if a Nottingham-based company has breached the United Nations arms embargo

US: Hiking the Cost of Bribery
by Emma SchwartzUS News & World Report
August 13th, 2007
The Justice Department crackdown on corrupt practices overseas ensnares both U.S. and foreign companies

COLOMBIA: Suing Multinationals Over Murder
by Ken StierTIME Magazine
August 1st, 2007
Organized labor often complains of its treatment at the hands of corporate America, but its accusations pale in comparison to those made recently by the widows of Colombian mine workers in an Alabama courtroom. During a two-week trial, a Birmingham jury weighed charges that the local Drummond Coal Company bore responsibility for the murders of three union leaders who represented workers at its Colombian mine - the world's largest open pit mine.

US: Blackwater-U. of I. tie
by E.A. Torriero and Jodi S. CohenThe Chicago Tribune
July 31st, 2007
The University of Illinois is investigating potential conflicts of interest involving the director of the school's prestigious police-training institute and Blackwater U.S.A., the military contractor.

ITALY: Devil's Advocate
by Daniel FisherForbes
July 24th, 2007
Italian oil giant Eni has a long history of cutting deals with anyone, and of accusations of corruption and bribery. Now that its future hangs on Russia and its notorious reputation in the energy market, has Eni finally met its match?

EUROPE: Brussels accused of breaking lobbyist rules
by Andrew Bounds Financial Times
July 23rd, 2007
European commissioners, the continent’s regulators, have been criticised by their own watchdog for refusing to divulge details of meetings they and their staff have held with lobbyists.

US: Ex-Willbros official who sought Nigeria contract is indicted
by David Ivanovich Houston Chronicle
July 23rd, 2007
A federal grand jury in Houston has charged a former executive of a Willbros Group subsidiary with conspiring to bribe Nigerian officials as part of an alleged scheme to win a major natural gas pipeline contract.

CONGO: Edmonds group in spin after miner is run out
by Ben LauranceSunday Times
July 22nd, 2007
Billy Rautenbach, a former kingpin of the mining world in southern Africa becomes the newest "persona non grata" in the new DRC regime's attempt to rid its mining industry of corruption.

NIGERIA: Tycoon exits Nigerian oil deals
BBC News
July 19th, 2007
Nigerian consortium Bluestar, led by tycoon Aliko Dangote, has pulled out of a deal to take stakes in oil refineries after protests by trade unionists.

US: Former KBR employee pleads guilty in Kuwaiti kickback case
by Brett ClantonHouston Chronicle
July 13th, 2007
A former KBR employee pleads guilty to Kuwaiti kickback charges.

US: Conrad Black Found Guilty in Fraud Trial
by Richard SilkosThe New York Times
July 13th, 2007
Conrad M. Black, the gregarious press tycoon also known as Lord Black of Crossharbour, was found guilty today by a Chicago jury of three counts of mail fraud and one count of obstruction of justice. He could face up to 35 years in prison.

WORLD: A Way for Resource-Rich Countries to Audit Their Way Out of Corruption
by Tyler CowenThe New York Times
July 12th, 2007
An Oxford economist has a new and potentially powerful idea: setting up an voluntary international charter to guide transparency efforts in resource-rich developing countries, in order to stave of corruption.

CHINA: Lead Toxins Take a Global Round Trip
by Gordon FaircloughThe Wall Street Journal
July 12th, 2007
High levels of toxic lead turning up in cheap jewelry from China are prompting recalls in the U.S. But some of the lead used by these Chinese manufacturers comes from an unconventional source: computers and other electronic goods discarded in Western countries and dumped in China.

SAO TOME: No Oil Yet, but African Isle Finds Slippery Dealings
by Barry Meier and Jad MouawadThe New York Times
July 2nd, 2007
The experience of Săo Tomé, a poor country that supports itself by selling cocoa and commemorative stamps featuring celebrities like Elvis Presley and Brigitte Bardot, shows how just the hint of oil can set off a scramble for riches.

CHINA: The Growing Dangers of China Trade
by Jyoti ThottamTIME Magazine
June 28th, 2007
Growing concerns over the safety of everyday goods manufactured in China and imported to the US have thrown into relief the problematic (and dangerous) differences in safety and regulatory standards between the two countries.

US: Bandar Bribery Case Crosses the Atlantic
by Emad Mekay Inter Press Service News Agency
June 27th, 2007
The U.S. Justice Department is investigating allegations of bribery by the British defence contractor BAE Systems to Prince Bandar Bin Sultan, a high-ranking member of the Saudi royal family with wide contacts and relations here.

US: Ex-Enron Executive Sentenced to Prison
by Bloomberg NewsThe New York Times
June 19th, 2007
The former chief of the Internet unit at Enron has been sentenced to 27 months in prison for helping mislead investors in the fraud that sent Enron, the world's largest energy trader, into bankruptcy.

MALAYSIA: Death of a Migrant Worker
by Anil NettoInter Press Service News Agency
June 19th, 2007
False promises of good pay and healthy working conditions fed to Indian migrant workers in Malaysia have led to destitution, physical abuse, and now, it seems, death.

CHINA: Child Labour Scandal Exposes Gross Corruption
by Antoaneta BezlovaInter Press Service News Agency
June 18th, 2007
An unfolding national scandal on the large-scale abuse of child labourers in the brick kiln industry raises questions on the adequacy of planned labour laws that are supposed to take on sweatshops and protect workers' rights.

US: What Ted Stevens, Bolivian cocaine and Halliburton have in common; Or, how the Alaskan Inupiat Eskimos got a no-bid contract in South America from the U.S. government.
by Michael SchererSalon.com
June 17th, 2007
An Alaskan Inupiat Eskimo firm has been awarded a multi-million dollar no-bid contract to feed Bolivian soldiers and police in that country's continuing drug war, raising questions concerning the firms on-going relationship with former Halliburton subsidiary KBR and the US Senate's Alaskan Native Corporation privilege.

UK: Mission impossible for legal top gun?
by David ProsserThe Independent
June 12th, 2007
BAE is set to appoint Lord Woolf as head of a business ethics committee designed to restore the reputation of the battered defence giant.

DR CONGO: DR Congo reviews 60 mining deals
BBC News
June 12th, 2007
The BBC's John James in Kinshasa says that since DR Congo's independence in 1960 its vast mineral wealth has been a key factor in the country's civil wars and instability.

IVORY COAST: Cocoa exports ‘fund’ Ivory Coast conflict
by  William Wallis and Dino MahtaniFinancial Times
June 7th, 2007
After diamonds and timber, Global Witness, the London-based pressure group, has turned its sights on chocolate in a report that claims cocoa exports from Ivory Coast, the world’s largest producer, have contributed to funding and prolonging the conflict there.

LONDON:Saudi Prince Secretly Made $2B in 1985 Arms Deal
by Kevin SullivanWashington Post Foreign Service
June 7th, 2007
Prince Bandar bin Sultan, a member of Saudi Arabia's royal family and the kingdom's former ambassador to the United States, pocketed about $2 billion in secret payments as part of a $80 billion arms deal between Britain and Saudi Arabia first signed in 1985, British media reported Thursday.

CAMBODIA:Denuded by Corruption, Plunder, Impunity
by Marwaan Macan-Markar Inter Press Service News Agency
June 6th, 2007
The Cambodian government turns its ire on non-governmental organisations that are critical of Cambodia's environmental policies and the copious relationships between logging companies and Cambodia's political elite and military.

GERMANY: AUB chief says Siemens funded union
by Richard Milnein FrankfurtThe Financial Times Limited 2007
May 31st, 2007
Siemens' senior management sanctioned the funding of an alternative labour organisation to the German industrial group's main trade union, according to claims made by the former head of the rival union.

US: Bristol-Myers to Pay Fine
Agence France Presse
May 31st, 2007
Bristol-Myers Squibb has agreed to plead guilty and pay a $1 million criminal fine for lying to the government about a patent deal on its blood-thinning drug Plavix, officials said Wednesday. The Justice Department said in a statement that the company’s actions had threatened to reduce competition for the drug, one of the best-selling prescription medications worldwide.

JAPAN: NEC workers fake orders worth Y2.2bn
by Mariko Sanchanta Financial Times
May 29th, 2007
NEC, the Japanese electronics company, Tuesday said that 10 rogue employees placed fake orders worth Y2.2bn ($200m) and accepted kickbacks worth Y500m, which they spent on personal wining and dining.

US: Investigators eye remodeling at Alaska home of Sen. Ted Stevens
Associated Press
May 29th, 2007
Federal agents are looking into Sen. Ted Stevens' role in the ongoing investigation into the remodeling of his Alaska home, according to two law enforcement officials familiar with the probe.

CHINA: BNP executive ‘bribed official’
by Richard McGregor in Beijing and Sundeep Tucker in Hong KongFinancial Times
May 29th, 2007
An executive in the Shanghai office of BNP Paribas bribed a senior government official in the capital in order to win business underwriting Chinese sovereign bonds, according to the Beijing city prosecutor’s office.

INDONESIA: Blood boils as mud volcano swallows homes
Sydney Morning Herald
May 26th, 2007
One year ago this Tuesday, a gas-exploration well part-owned by the Australian mining giant Santos blew, sending a geyser of mud and toxic gas into the air. Nearby villages and factories were flooded, then a big highway and railway were covered, and later East Java's main gas pipeline ruptured.

AUSTRALIA: Miner's poll cash for MPs
by Amanda O'BrienThe Australian
May 19th, 2007
MINING company Precious Metals Australia donated thousands of dollars to the election campaigns of two West Australian politicians who helped write a doctored report that commercially benefited the company.

US: Blackwater lawsuit accuses ex-employee of stealing secrets
by Bill SizemoreThe Virginian-Pilot
May 10th, 2007
Blackwater USA is accusing an ex-employee of stealing trade secrets in a case featuring allegations of false imprisonment, gun-waving commandos, cloak-and-dagger contracts and a late-night police raid.

IRAQ: 'Pentagon Moved to Fix Iraqi Media Before Invasion'
by Jim LobeInter Press Service
May 9th, 2007
In the run-up to the March 2003 invasion of Iraq, the Pentagon planned to create a 'Rapid Reaction Media Team' (RRMT) designed to ensure control over major Iraqi media while providing an Iraqi 'face' for its efforts, according to a ‘White Paper' obtained by the independent National Security Archive (NSA) which released it Tuesday.

CONGO: New row over delay of Congo funds report
by Dino MahtaniFinancial Times
May 8th, 2007
The World Bank has withheld the findings of an inquiry into alleged mismanagement of bank funds in the Democratic Republic of Congo, raising fresh questions about the anti-corruption strategy of Paul Wolfowitz, the bank's president

CONGO: New row over delay of Congo funds report
by Dino MahtaniFinancial Times
May 8th, 2007
The World Bank has withheld the findings of an inquiry into alleged mismanagement of bank funds in the Democratic Republic of Congo, raising fresh questions about the anti-corruption strategy of Paul Wolfowitz, the bank's president.

US: Chevron Seen Settling Case on Iraq Oil
by Claudio Gatti and Jad MouwadNew York Times
May 8th, 2007
Chevron, the second-largest American oil company, is preparing to acknowledge that it should have known kickbacks were being paid to Saddam Hussein on oil it bought from Iraq as part of a defunct United Nations program, according to investigators.

US: Firms Protest Exclusion From Iraq Security Bid
by Alec Klein and Steve FainaruWashington Post
May 5th, 2007
Two private security contractors have lodged formal protests against the Army, claiming they have been unfairly excluded from competing for one of the largest security jobs in Iraq, according to government documents and sources familiar with the matter.

KAZAKHSTAN: U.S. Firm Pleads Guilty In Bribery Case
by Nikola KrastevRadio Free Europe
April 30th, 2007
The Texas-based oil-services company Baker Hughes pled guilty on April 26 in a U.S. federal court to violating U.S. antibribery provisions, and agreed to pay a fine of $44 million.

COLOMBIA: Chiquita case puts big firms on notice
by Sibylla BrodzinskyChristian Science Monitor
April 11th, 2007
The company's admission that it paid Colombian paramilitaries $1.7 million has sparked outrage in Colombia.

US: Gag order for former Wal-Mart employee
CNN Money
April 9th, 2007
Wal-Mart (NYSE:WMT) won a gag order to stop a fired security operative from talking to reporters and a judge ordered him to provide Wal-Mart attorneys with 'the names of all persons to whom he has transmitted, since January 15, 2007, any Wal-Mart information.'?

FRANCE: Total CEO summoned by SEC on Iran deal
Reuters
April 3rd, 2007
The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the U.S. Department of Justice have summoned the chief executive of French energy giant Total SA to explain the group's activities in Iran, a French newspaper said on Tuesday.

BURMA: Shackles, torture, executions: inside Burma's jungle gulags
by Dan McDougallThe Observer
March 25th, 2007
There is no real dissent here in Rangoon. People are too scared to be members of any democratic movement. We are all just victims, people like me who are trying to get their lives back.' Ko Min, 47, his wife and two sons were swept up with hundreds of others in a military raid on their village close to the city of Bagan in 2005. The family were put to work, clearing jungle, digging latrines and an irrigation system for a military camp outside Mandalay. (mentions Zarubezhneft oil company)

FRANCE: France Begins Formal Inquiry on Oil Executive
by James KanterNew York Times
March 23rd, 2007
Problems increased for the French oil company Total on Thursday when Christophe de Margerie, the chief executive, was put under formal investigation by French authorities, who are looking into allegations that the company paid kickbacks to win a gas contract in Iran during the late 1990s.

COLOMBIA: Colombia seeks extradition of 8 people in Chiquita payments to terrorists
by Javier BaenaUnion-Tribune
March 23rd, 2007
Colombia's chief prosecutor said Tuesday he will demand the extradition of eight people allegedly involved with Chiquita's payments to right-wing paramilitaries and leftist rebels in a region where it had profitable banana-growing operations.

US: In Transcripts, Bromwell Boasts of Comcast Ties
by Eric RichWashington Post
March 22nd, 2007
Thomas L. Bromwell claimed to be driven by principle when, as a Maryland state senator in 2000, he led a legislative effort that allowed Comcast and other companies to charge customers late fees at rates that courts had deemed excessive.

UK: British firms face fraud allegations over 'phantom' armoured vehicles
by 
Nick Fielding and Ian Cobain
The Guardian (UK)
March 20th, 2007
Three British companies are facing accusations that they engaged in large-scale fraud in Iraq after it emerged they were paid for "phantom" armoured vehicles destined to protect Iraqi government employees. The vehicles were never delivered, but the companies were paid anyway.

US: Judge OKs key witness in Colombian deaths case
International Herald Tribune
March 20th, 2007
A former Colombian security official who claims he saw an official of a U.S.-based company pay for the murders of union leaders in the South American country can testify in the upcoming civil trial over the deaths, a U.S. judge ruled Tuesday.

US: Chiquita admits paying fighters
BBC News
March 14th, 2007
US banana company Chiquita Brands International has said it will plead guilty to a count of doing business with a paramilitary group in Colombia.

US: Broadcasters Agree to Fine Over Payoffs
by Jeff LeedsThe New York Times
March 6th, 2007
Radio broadcasters have long been accused of corrupting the public airwaves by accepting bribes from corporate music giants. But in a pair of agreements disclosed yesterday, the broadcasters moved to resolve accusations that they had auctioned off the airwaves by agreeing to pay a landmark penalty and pledging to play more music from independent recording artists.

UK: CAAT secures key High Court ruling against BAE and Government
The Lawyer.com
March 5th, 2007
The High Court last week ordered BAE Systems to produce a sworn affidavit divulging how the aerospace giant obtained a confidential and legally privileged document belonging to pressure group Campaign Against the Arms Trade (CAAT).

INDIA: India asks Argentina to extradite bribery suspect in arms scandal
EUX.TV
March 2nd, 2007
Indian authorities have made a formal request to Argentina for the extradition of Ottavio Quattrocchi, an Italian businessman accused in an arms bribery case, media reports said Friday.

IRAQ: New Oil Law Seen as Cover for Privatisation
by Emad MekayInter Press News Service (IPS)
February 27th, 2007
The U.S.-backed Iraqi cabinet approved a new oil law Monday that is set to give foreign companies the long-term contracts and safe legal framework they have been waiting for, but which has rattled labour unions and international campaigners who say oil production should remain in the hands of Iraqis.

GERMANY: Siemens chief says corruption scandal won't delay next strategic plan
by Mark Landler and Carter DoughertyHerald Trribune
February 27th, 2007
Even as Siemens has reported buoyant financial results — thanks in part to Kleinfeld's overhaul of its operations — it has been hit with a fast-expanding corruption scandal that threatens to sink its reputation.

US: Corporate Profits Take an Offshore Vacation
by Lucy KomisarInter Press Service
February 23rd, 2007
Last week, Merck, the pharmaceutical multinational, announced that it will pay 2.3 billion dollars in back taxes, interest and penalties in one of the largest settlements for tax evasion the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has ever imposed.

MALI: Country must work to avoid the "resource curse"
Reuters
February 2nd, 2007
Sambala Macalou, mayor of Sadiola village in western Mali where the South African gold mining company AngloGold Ashanti operates, thinks the company is short-changing the community and ignoring its needs.

NIGERIA: Corruption and Misuse Robs Nigerians of Rights
Human Rights Watch
January 31st, 2007
Human Rights Watch Report: Rivers State, Nigeria Local Governments Squander Oil Revenues Instead of Funding Health, Education

US: Ex-Refco owner charged in fraud
Associated Press
January 16th, 2007
A former owner of Refco Inc. was charged Tuesday in a fraud that cost investors more than $1 billion in losses, prosecutors said as they also added charges against the former chief executive and chief financial officers of the commodities brokerage giant.

US: Lockheed Stock and Two Smoking Barrels
by Richard CummingsPlayboy.com
January 16th, 2007
If you think the Iraq war hasn't worked out very well for anyone, think again. Defense contractors such as Lockheed are thriving. And no wonder: Here's the story how Lockheed's interests- as opposed to those of the American citizenry- set the course of U.S. policy after 9/11.

US: US charges oil-for-food chief
by Brooke Masters and Mark TurnerFinancial Times
January 16th, 2007
Benon Sevan, the administrator who was in charge of overseeing the United Nation's oil-for-food programme for Iraq, was indicted on Tuesday on federal charges of bribery and conspiracy to commit wire fraud, as part of a growing attempt by prosecutors to hold UN employees accountable to US laws.

US: Gates Foundation faces multibillion-dollar dilemma
by Kristi HeimSeattle Times
January 14th, 2007
The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation owns shares of BP — a company accused of fouling the air with its oil refinery and paper mill in South Africa. Since the foundation spends billions of dollars to improve the health of Africans, that investment strategy would seem to conflict with its mission.

US: Dark cloud over good works of Gates Foundation
by Charles Piller, Edmund Sanders and Robyn DixonL A Times
January 7th, 2007
An ink spot certified that he had been immunized against polio and measles, thanks to a vaccination drive supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. But polio is not the only threat Justice faces. Almost since birth, he has had respiratory trouble. His neighbors call it "the cough." People blame fumes and soot spewing from flames that tower 300 feet into the air over a nearby oil plant. It is owned by the Italian petroleum giant Eni, whose investors include the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

UK: Iraq poised to end drought for thirsting oil giants
by Danny FortsonThe Independent (UK)
January 7th, 2007
For more than three decades, foreign oil companies wanting into Iraq have been like children pressed against the sweet shop window - desperately seeking to feast on the goodies but having no way of getting through the door. That could soon change.

SAUDI ARABIA: Arms deal probe stopped over Saudi threat to cease terror help
Agence France Presse
December 18th, 2006
A British investigation into a controversial arms deal with Saudi Arabia was stopped because Riyadh threatened to withdraw all co-operation on security and intelligence, a newspaper has reported.

SAUDI ARABIA: Saudi 'slush fund' investigation discontinued
by Elsa McLaren and Andrew EllsonTimes Online U.K.
December 14th, 2006
A two-year corruption investigation by the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) into a ÂŁ60 million "slush fund" that was allegedly set up for members of Saudi Arabia's royal family was discontinued today.

UK: Renowned cancer scientist was paid by chemical firm for 20 years
by Sarah BoseleyThe Guardian (UK)
December 8th, 2006
A world-famous British scientist failed to disclose that he held a paid consultancy with a chemical company for more than 20 years while investigating cancer risks in the industry, the Guardian can reveal.

AFGHANISTAN: The Reach of War; U.S. Report Finds Dismal Training of Afghan Police
by James Glantz and David Rohde; Carlotta GallThe New York Times
December 4th, 2006
Five years after the fall of the Taliban, a joint report by the Pentagon and the State Department has found that the American-trained police force in Afghanistan is largely incapable of carrying out routine law enforcement work, and that managers of the $1.1 billion training program cannot say how many officers are actually on duty or where thousands of trucks and other equipment issued to police units have gone.

GERMANY: Arrest made in VW corruption scandal
by Benjamin DierksThe Guardian (UK)
November 21st, 2006
The investigation into the corruption scandal at Volkswagen, Europe's biggest carmaker, tightened today with the arrest of Klaus Volkert, the firm's former head of the works council.

US: Inuit sue US government over BP land usage
by David LitterickThe Daily Telegraph (UK)
November 20th, 2006
Fresh from settling a lawsuit over last year's fatal explosion at its Texas City oil refinery, BP looks set to become embroiled in a legal battle in Alaska over royalties paid on oil production in Prudhoe Bay.

GERMANY: Siemens Executives Held Over Bribery Allegations
Der Spiegel
November 17th, 2006
Five Siemens executives have been arrested in raids at Siemens offices across Germany this week. Prosecutors are investigating charges of embezzlement and bribery at the company.

CUBA: Cuba's Military Puts Business On Front Lines
by JOSÉ DE CĂ“RDOBAWall Street Journal
November 15th, 2006
At the height of the Cold War, Cuba's soldiers became a legend on the island when they punched through enemy lines, defeating South Africa's army in Angola. Today Cuban generals are applying capitalist tactics to try to improve bottom lines in businesses that range from growing beans to running hotels and airlines.

WORLD: Controlling the Corporate Mercenaries
by Nick Dearden, War on WantZmag
November 7th, 2006
While Iraq represents bloodshed and death on a massive scale to most people, to Private Military and Security Companies (PMSCs) it has brought a boom time, boosting the revenues of British-based PMSCs alone from ÂŁ320 million in 2003 to more than ÂŁ1.8 billion in 2004. In the same year income for the industry worldwide reached $100 billion.

KAZAKHSTAN: Oil, Cash and Corruption
by Ron StodghillThe New York Times
November 5th, 2006
In February, the United States attorney’s office in Manhattan is scheduled to go to trial in the largest foreign bribery case brought against an American citizen. It involves a labyrinthine trail of international financial transfers, suspected money laundering and a dizzying array of domestic and overseas shell corporations. The criminal case names Mr. Nazarbayev as an unindicted co-conspirator.

US: Ponzi Scheme or Variety Show? Scams Use Leased Radio Time To Target Immigrant Listeners
by Jennifer LevitzWall Street Journal
October 31st, 2006
Rick Santos, manager of WLQY-AM in Miami, says he thought the popular Creole program that aired six days a week on his radio station was a "musical variety show." It was actually part of a fraud, according to the Securities and Exchange Commission. Scam artists used the radio for two years to promote an investment scheme that ensnared 631 Haitian immigrants and cost them nearly $6 million, a federal court ruled after an SEC complaint.

US: Air America on Ad Blacklist?
Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting
October 31st, 2006
An internal memo from ABC Radio Networks to its affiliates reveals scores of powerful sponsors have a standing order that their commercials never be placed on syndicated Air America programming that airs on ABC affiliates.

US: Ads Test Payola Case Settlement
by Jeff LeedsThe New York Times
October 25th, 2006
Hardly more than a year has passed since the nation’s biggest record labels started agreeing to a series of measures that were intended to end the industry’s long history of employing bribes and other shady practices to influence which songs are heard on the radio.

US: Tobacco Deal Haunts Contender for WHO Chief
by John Lyons and Betsy McKayWall Street Journal
October 24th, 2006
Julio Frenk was a finalist for the top job at the World Health Organization three years ago. The post is available again, but the Mexican health minister's latest campaign for the job may go up in smoke.

INDIA: "Bribery scandal could harm defense ties with India"
by Ran DagoniGlobes (Israel)
October 24th, 2006
Allegations made by the Indian Central Bureau of Investigation that Israeli defense firms bribed Indian officials so that they would prefer Israeli products could chill defense ties between the two countries, warns US magazine “Defense Week.”

US: SKILLING GETS 24 YEARS IN PRISON FOR ENRON FRAUD
by Tom FowlerHouston Chronicle
October 23rd, 2006
Former Enron CEO Jeff Skilling was sentenced today to 24 years in prison for his role in the energy company's 2001 collapse in what has become one of the nation's biggest corporate scandals.

US: Mailed Diebold Disks Raise Voting Machine Fears
Associated Press
October 20th, 2006
Disks containing what appears to be software code used in Maryland's touchscreen voting machines in 2004 were delivered anonymously to a former state legislator, raising fresh concerns about the reliability of the voting system.

IRAQ: Pentagon Audit Clears Propaganda Effort
by Mark MazzettiNew York Times
October 20th, 2006
An American military propaganda campaign that planted favorable news articles in the Iraqi news media did not violate laws or Pentagon regulations, but it was not properly supervised by military officials in Baghdad, an audit by the Pentagon Inspector General has concluded.

JAMAICA: Trafigura figures in South Africa bribery scandal
by Olivia CampbellThe Jamaica Observer
October 18th, 2006
Trafigura president Claude Dauphin, who in August paid a visit to Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller at Jamaica House before his company controversially transferred over $31 million to the People's National Party, is a man steeped in the art of expensive gift giving.

US: Contractor pleads guilty in train station corruption
Associated Press
October 16th, 2006
A fourth defendant pleaded guilty Monday to participating in corruption involving the renovation of state offices at a train station, authorities said.

IRAQ: As U.S. effort winds down, can Iraq fill 'reconstruction gap'?
by Charles J. HanleyAssociated Press
October 16th, 2006
America's big builders invaded Iraq three years ago, hard on the heels of U.S. troops and tanks. Now the reconstruction billions are drying up so they're pulling out, leaving both completed and unfinished projects in the hands of an Iraqi government unprepared to manage either.

IRAQ: Firm That Paid Iraq Papers Gets New Deal
by Rebecca SantanaAssociated Press
September 27th, 2006
A public relations company that participated in a controversial U.S. military program that paid Iraqi newspapers for stories favorable to coalition forces has been awarded another multimillion-dollar media contract with American forces in Iraq.

US: Rep. Ney Admits Selling Influence
by James V. Grimaldi and Susan SchmidtWashington Post
September 16th, 2006
Rep. Robert W. Ney (R-Ohio) agreed yesterday to plead guilty to corruption charges after admitting to performing a variety of official acts for lobbyists in exchange for campaign contributions, expensive meals, luxury travel, sports tickets and thousands of dollars in gambling chips. He is the first elected official to face prison time in the ongoing influence-peddling investigation of former GOP lobbying powerhouse Jack Abramoff.

US: Regulator Says Civil Suit Likely For Raines
by Terence O'HaraWashingtom Post
September 14th, 2006
Fannie Mae's top regulator yesterday said it is "more than likely" the federal government will sue former chief executive Franklin D. Raines and other former company officers, seeking to recover bonuses and salary and perhaps impose fines for the mortgage finance company's accounting debacle.

US: BP's U.S. chief faces more grilling in Congress
by Shawn McCarthyThe Globe and Mail
September 9th, 2006
It's Round 2 Tuesday for Robert Malone, BP PLC's recently installed chief of U.S. operations, as he struggles to restore the company's battered reputation in its biggest market.

US: 10 Miami Journalists Take U.S. Pay
by Oscar CorralMiami Herald
September 8th, 2006
At least 10 South Florida journalists, including three from El Nuevo Herald, received regular payments from the U.S. government for programs on Radio MartĂ­ and TV MartĂ­, two broadcasters aimed at undermining the communist government of Fidel Castro. The payments totaled thousands of dollars over several years.

WORLD: Firms admit paying bribes in World Bank program
Reuters
August 31st, 2006
A "healthy" number of companies have admitted paying bribes under a new World Bank disclosure program, which encourages firms that have worked on bank-funded projects to report corruption or fraud.

US: U.S. Agencies Open Another Investigation Into Energy Trading at BP
by Jad MouawadNew York Times
August 30th, 2006
BP, the giant oil company, acknowledged yesterday that federal investigators were looking into possible trading irregularities in oil and gasoline markets.

US: Schering-Plough Agrees To Plead Guilty, Pay Fine
by Denise LavoieAssociated Press
August 30th, 2006
Schering-Plough Corp. on Tuesday agreed to pay $435 million and plead guilty to conspiracy to settle a federal investigation into marketing of its drugs for unapproved uses and overcharging Medicaid for certain drugs.

US: Prudential to Pay Fine in Trading
by Landon Thomas Jr.The New York Times
August 29th, 2006
Prudential Financial, the life insurance company, agreed yesterday to pay $600 million to settle charges with federal and state regulators that one of its units engaged in inappropriate mutual fund trading.

CHAD: Chad Orders 2 Oil Companies to Leave
by Madjiasra Nako The Associated Press
August 27th, 2006
Chad's president on Saturday ordered oil companies Chevron Corp. and Petronas to leave the country, saying neither has paid taxes and his country will take responsibility for the oil fields they have overseen.

CHAD: Chad president orders Chevron, Petronas to leave
by Betel MiaromReuters
August 26th, 2006
Chad ordered Chevron and Petronas on Saturday to leave the country within 24 hours for failing to honour tax obligations, in a move apparently motivated by a desire to earn more from its oil.

KAZAKSTAN: Environmental Charges Unlikely to Derail Kazakstan's Chevron Contract
Environment News Service
August 23rd, 2006
Kazakstan’s largest oil concessionaire, Tengiz Chevroil, has been threatened with having its license withdrawn because of accusations it breached environmental legislation. Analysts say that in reality, the Kazak government will never take such a step, since this would provoke a major crisis in relations with the United States. The largest shareholder in Tengiz Chevroil is American oil giant Chevron.

PERU: Beggar on a Throne of Gold
by Milagros SalazarInter Press Service (IPS)
August 23rd, 2006
Mining companies operating in Peru are seeing increasing millions in profits as a result of the surge in international prices for metals, but few are contributing what is needed to alleviate the poverty of the people living in mining areas.

WORLD: New alliance seeks fight water sector corruption
by Alister DoyleReuters
August 22nd, 2006
Water experts and businesses teamed up on Tuesday to fight corruption feared to be siphoning off billions of dollars from projects to supply drinking water to the Third World.

US: S.E.C. Asks Morgan Stanley Chief to Testify
Reuters
July 21st, 2006
The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has asked Morgan Stanley (MS.N) Chief Executive John Mack to testify regarding what role he may have played in an insider trading case involving hedge fund Pequot Capital, Morgan Stanley said on Friday.

US: Ex-Brocade CEO, VP Charged With Fraud
The Asssociated Press
The charges against two former executives of Brocade Communications Systems Inc. for alleged fraud are the strongest sign yet that a stock options probe involving at least 80 companies will probably widen in coming months, legal and accounting experts said.

US: 2 Are Charged in Criminal Case on Stock Options
by Damon Darlin and Eric DashThe New York Times
July 21st, 2006
Federal prosecutors on Thursday filed the first criminal charges against executives in a mushrooming investigation into the possible manipulation of stock options.

US: At Ground Zero, Builder Is Barred but Not His Kin
by Chalres V. BagliThe New York Times
July 21st, 2006
The pieces of Dino Tomassetti Sr.’s construction empire are all over ground zero. But Mr. Tomassetti, the 79-year-old patriarch of this empire, is barred from setting foot on the 16-acre site. Federal prosecutors and testimony have linked him to organized crime figures. The central contract for excavation and foundation work, which is worth tens of millions of dollars, was awarded to his youngest son, Dino Tomassetti Jr., 27, who until recently chauffeured his father from job site to job site in a black Lincoln Navigator.

US: Medtronic Will Settle Accusations on Kickbacks
by Reed AbelsonThe New York Times
July 19th, 2006
Medtronic, one of the nation’s largest medical device manufacturers, said yesterday that it had agreed to pay the federal government $40 million to settle accusations that its spinal-implant division had paid kickbacks to doctors as a way of inducing them to use its products.

UK: SFO to investigate Southern Water
by Hans KundnaniThe Guardian
July 19th, 2006
The Serious Fraud Office today announced an investigation into whether Southern Water deliberately misled the water regulator, Ofwat, about its failure to meet customer service standards.

UK: Thames Water faces fine of up to Ł140m
by Hans KundnaniThe Guardian
July 19th, 2006
Thames Water could face a fine of up to Ł140m for failing to provide a good service to its eight million customers in the south-east of England.

US: Study Finds Backdating of Options Widespread
by Stephanie SaulThe New York Times
July 17th, 2006
More than 2,000 companies appear to have used backdated stock options to sweeten their top executives’ pay packages, according to a new study that suggests the practice is far more widespread than previously disclosed.

LIBERIA: Illicit Mining Persists in Gbarpolu County
by Mensiegar Karnga, Jr.The Analyst (Monrovia)
July 13th, 2006
The senior Senator of Gbarpolu County, Rev. Samuel Tormetie has disclosed that massive illicit mining activities are on the increase in the county, and has called on the national government to immediately stop the illegal mining so as to save the county from been depleted.

US: Lawmaker Criticized for PAC Fees Paid to Wife
by Jonathan Weisman and Jeffrey H. BirnbaumThe Washington Post
July 11th, 2006
In the past two years, campaign and political action committees controlled by Rep. John T. Doolittle (R-Calif.) paid ever-larger commissions to his wife's one-person company and spent tens of thousands of dollars on gifts at stores such as Saks Fifth Avenue and Tiffany & Co. and a Ritz-Carlton day spa.

US: Lay's Death Could Set Skilling Free
by Barrie McKennaThe Globe and Mail (Canada)
July 7th, 2006
Kenneth Lay's sudden death could prove to be an unexpected legal bequest to Jeffrey Skilling, his co-defendant in the landmark Enron Corp. fraud case.

US: Lobbying Firm Underreported Income
by R. Jeffrey SmithThe Washington Post
July 6th, 2006
A Washington lobbying firm at the center of a federal corruption probe failed to disclose at least $755,000 in income from 17 nonprofit organizations and governmental entities, and $635,000 from 18 other clients between 1998 and 2005, according to the firm's recently amended filings with the clerk of the House.

US: Lay's Death Complicates Efforts to Seize Assets
by Simon RomeroThe New York Times
July 6th, 2006
In yet another bizarre twist to the Enron saga, the sudden death of Kenneth L. Lay on Wednesday may have spared his survivors financial ruin. Mr. Lay's death effectively voids the guilty verdict against him, temporarily thwarting the federal government's efforts to seize his remaining real estate and financial assets, legal experts say.

SOUTH KOREA: U.S. Firm Has Korea Up in Arms
by Martin FacklerThe New York Times
July 5th, 2006
South Korean authorities are continuing a high-profile investigation into Lone Star, the Dallas-based private-equity fund, fueling a public backlash against excessive profits made by foreign investment funds.

US: Petitions to FDA Sometimes Delay Generic Drugs
by Marc KaufmanThe Washington Post
July 3rd, 2006
A procedure designed to alert the Food and Drug Administration to scientific and safety issues is getting a hard look from members of Congress, who say they are concerned that it may be getting subverted by the brand-name drug industry.

SOUTH AFRICA: Germany Probes Alleged Kickbacks in SA Corvette Deal
by Andre Jurgens and Sapa-DpaSunday Times (Johannesburg)
July 2nd, 2006
Authorities in Germany are investigating alleged kickbacks of millions of rands arising out of the sale of four corvettes to South Africa.

US: Jury Convicts HealthSouth Founder in Bribery Trial
by Carrie JohnsonThe Washington Post
June 30th, 2006
An Alabama jury yesterday convicted HealthSouth Corp. founder Richard M. Scrushy -- acquitted last year of federal accounting-fraud charges -- of paying half a million dollars in bribes to former governor Don Siegelman in exchange for a seat on a state health-care board.

FRANCE: France's shareholder revolt
by Henri AstierBBC
June 29th, 2006

US: Ex-Governor and Executive Convicted of Bribery
Associated Press
June 29th, 2006
Former Alabama Gov. Don Siegelman and former HealthSouth CEO Richard Scrushy were convicted Thursday in a bribery scheme that derailed Siegelman's campaign to retake his former office.

US: SEC Lawyer Dismissed for a Donor?
by Ari BermanThe Nation
June 28th, 2006
Last year, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) began investigating one of the nation's largest hedge funds, Pequot Capitol Management, for possible insider trading. Up until last summer, the inquiry was headed by SEC lawyer Gary Aguirre. His investigation proceeded smoothly, Aguirre claims, until he asked for testimony from former Pequot chairman and Morgan Stanley CEO, John Mack, a top Bush donor.

KATRINA: 'Breathtaking' Waste and Fraud in Hurricane Aid
by Eric LiptonThe New York Times
June 27th, 2006
Among the many superlatives associated with Hurricane Katrina can now be added this one: it produced one of the most extraordinary displays of scams, schemes and stupefying bureaucratic bungles in modern history, costing taxpayers up to $2 billion.

US: FCC Head 'in Bed' With Business in Magazine Spread
by Arshad MohammedThe Washington Post
June 26th, 2006
When you run an independent federal agency, you generally want to avoid the appearance of being in bed with lobbyists or big business. So why is Federal Communications Commission Chairman Kevin J. Martin standing on an unmade bed in a hotel room in a glossy magazine photograph that also features an influential lobbyist and a communications executive?

US: More Turbulence as BA Faces US Lawsuit Over Price-fixing Claims
by Richard WrayThe Guardian (UK)
June 26th, 2006
The turbulence surrounding British Airways, and allegations of its involvement in an alleged price-fixing cartel, strengthened over the weekend with news that a potentially expensive class action law suit has been filed in the US.

US: Ex-Homestore CEO Guilty in Fraud Trial
by Martin ZimmermanThe Los Angeles Times
June 23rd, 2006
A jury convicts Stuart Wolff of directing a $67-million accounting scheme in which the online home-listing firm inflated revenue.

US: Dynegy Re-Sentencing Could Give Insight
The Associated Press
June 21st, 2006
The new sentence a federal judge imposes on a former Dynegy Inc. executive could provide some insight into how he'll approach the October sentencings of Enron Corp. founder Kenneth Lay and former Chief Executive Jeffrey Skilling.

US: Federal contracts up 86% under Bush; Halliburton rises 600%
Raw Story
June 20th, 2006
Top contractor Lockheed got contracts larger than budget of Congress, Dept. of Interior

US: Tanker Inquiry Finds Rumsfeld's Attention Was Elsewhere
by R. Jeffrey SmithThe Washington Post
June 20th, 2006
The topic was the largest defense procurement scandal in recent decades, and the two investigators for the Pentagon's inspector general in Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld's office on April 1, 2005, asked the secretary to raise his hand and swear to tell the truth.

US: Apollo Group Receives Subpoena for Stock Options Records
Bloomberg News
June 20th, 2006
Apollo Group Inc., a for-profit education company whose schools include the University of Phoenix, said yesterday that it had received a subpoena from the United States attorney's office for the Southern District of New York, related to stock option grants.

US: WesternGeco Agrees to $19.6 Million Fraud Fine
by Lynn J. CookThe Houston Chronicle
June 16th, 2006
A Houston-based subsidiary of Schlumberger, the world's largest oilfield services company, has agreed to pay $19.6 million in penalties for "knowingly submitting fraudulent visa applications" for foreign workers assigned to vessels operating in the Gulf of Mexico, according to a statement from the U.S. Dept. of Justice.

SOUTH KOREA: Ex-Govt Official Arrested in Hyundai Probe
The Associated Press
June 15th, 2006
A former government official was arrested on bribery charges, authorities said Thursday, as prosecutors stepped up a probe into where Hyundai Motor Co. used slush funds allegedly siphoned off from affiliates.

US: 2 Utilities to Pay Enron $50 Million in Settlement
by David Cay JohnstonThe New York Times
June 14th, 2006
Two small utilities are set to pay more than $50 million to Enron for electricity that they agreed to buy but that Enron will never deliver, under terms of a settlement that raises larger issues.

US: Judge Grants Tyco Investors Class-Action Status
by Katharine WebsterAssociated Press
June 14th, 2006
Former shareholders of Tyco International Ltd., whose former chief executive and chief financial officer were convicted of fraud, have been certified as a class to sue the company and its accounting firm, PricewaterhouseCoopers.

US: Options Scandal Growing
by Marcy GordonAssociated Press
June 14th, 2006
Like betting on a horse race after its finish, some executives were guaranteed to be "in the money." That is how investor advocates and irate shareholders describe it as signs emerge daily about possible manipulation of the timing of stock-option grants to enrich top company executives.

UZBEKISTAN: Coca-Cola accused over Uzbek venture
by Edward Alden in Washington and Andrew Ward in AtlantaFinancial Times
June 13th, 2006
Coca-Cola has been hit with an arbitration claim seeking more than $100m in damages, alleging that the the world's largest soft drinks maker conspired with the government of Uzbekistan against a joint venture partner who fell out of favour with the country's authoritarian ruler, Islam Karimov.

US: Investigation exposes dots connecting Lewis, Lowery
by George WatsonInland Valley Daily Bulletin
June 11th, 2006
The investigation into Lewis and Lowery stems from a federal probe of former Rep. Randy "Duke'' Cunningham, R-Escondido, who was sentenced to eight years in prison in November after admitting he accepted more than $2.4 million in bribes from businessmen seeking federal contracts.

US: Release ordered for 2 executives
by John C. RoperThe Houston Chronicle
June 9th, 2006
Two Merrill Lynch executives convicted for their roles in a Nigerian barge deal that inflated Enron's profits have been ordered released from prison pending their appeal.

US: N.H. Files Charge Against ING Groep Units
by Norma LoveAssociated Press
June 9th, 2006
State securities officials have charged units of Dutch financial services giant ING Groep NV with taking undisclosed payments for promoting poor investments to state employees in their individual retirement plans.

LIBERIA: Insurance Scam - $1.2 Million Diverted, Top MIA-MOF Official Linked
The Analyst (Monrovia)
June 9th, 2006
The SECURISK insurance company has illegally collected insurance premiums amounting to 1.2 million Liberian dollars from employees of the Ministry of Internal Affairs.

US: Russian Oligarch Fridman, Corporation Sued for Racketeering, Fraud That Used U.S. Banks and Exchanges
PR Newswire
June 9th, 2006
The suit alleges that Alfa, one of the largest business conglomerates in the Russian Federation -- along with Russian oligarch Mikhail Fridman and U.S. citizen Leonid Rozhetskin -- engaged in a vast international money laundering and fraud scheme in an attempt to take control of the Russian cellular industry.

US: Questions Raised on Another Chief's Stock Options
by Barnaby J. FederThe New York Times
June 9th, 2006
Accusations of corporate stock option abuse were leveled against Cyberonics, a medical device maker that is no stranger to controversy.

US: In Las Vegas, They're Playing With a Stacked Judicial Deck
by Michael J. Goodman and William C. RempelThe Los Angeles Times
June 8th, 2006
When Judge Gene T. Porter last ran for reelection, a group of Las Vegas lawyers sponsored a fundraiser for him at Big Bear in California. Even by Las Vegas standards, it was brazen. Some of the sponsors had cases before him. One case was set for a crucial hearing in four days.

US: Three Restaurant Executives Will Admit Fraud Charges
by Floyd NorrisThe New York Times
June 8th, 2006
Three former top officers of Buca Inc., an operator of Italian restaurants, have agreed to plead guilty to federal fraud charges in connection with a scheme to create false profits for Buca and allow executives to steal hundreds of thousands of dollars to pay for a wide range of expenses including the use of an Italian villa and visits to strip clubs.

US: Zomax ex-CEO convicted
by Thomas LeeStar Tribune (Minneapolis)
June 7th, 2006
Jim Anderson, who was chairman and CEO of Zomax when it was one of Minnesota's technology high-fliers in the late 1990s, was convicted of six counts of insider trading and five counts of engaging in illegal monetary transactions.

JAPAN: Japan Arrests Corporate Raider on Securities Charges
by Martin FacklerThe New York Times
June 5th, 2006
A self-proclaimed corporate raider who struck fear into Japan's insider-run boardrooms by demanding American-style shareholder rights was arrested on Monday on suspicion of insider trading.

US: For Law Firm, Serial Plaintiff Had Golden Touch
by Julie Creswell and Jonathan D. GlaterThe New York Times
June 5th, 2006
Mr. Vogel now says, according to a plea agreement with federal prosecutors, that he and members of his family were actually linchpins in a long-running arrangement that helped Milberg Weiss snare the lucrative lead counsel position in the Oxford Health and many other securities lawsuits, reaping hundreds of millions of dollars in legal fees.

ITALY: Parmalat Fraud Hearing Opens
Associated Press
June 5th, 2006
Two and a half years after the $18-billion (U.S.) collapse of the Parmalat dairy company, a closed-door preliminary hearing opened Monday in Italy's main criminal proceedings to arise from Europe's largest corporate failure.

US: Disgruntled Investors File Lawsuit Against Vonage
by Paul TaylorFinancial Times
June 5th, 2006
Vonage Holdings, the pioneering internet phone company whose shares have fallen 30 per cent since their market debut 10 days ago, has been accused in a class-action lawsuit of violating US securities laws.

US: Split verdict in Enron broadband retrial
by Kristen HayesAssociated Press
June 1st, 2006
Of two former Enron Corp. broadband executives to be retried on fraud and conspiracy charges in the wake of a hung jury last year, one faces prison and the other is free.

SOUTH KOREA: Daewoo Founder Is Sentenced for Fraud Charges
by Choe Sang-HunInternational Herald Tribune
May 30th, 2006
Kim Woo Choong, whose career as the rags-to-riches founder of Daewoo Group ended in South Korea's biggest corporate fraud scandal, was sentenced today to 10 years in prison and ordered to forfeit 21.4 trillion won, or $22.57 billion.

KENYA: French Company Backs Out of Crucial Meeting With KACC
by Joseph MurimiThe East African Standard (Nairobi)
May 27th, 2006
The French company at the centre of the Sh7 billion Anglo Leasing Finance scandals has refused to meet the Kenya Anti-Corruption Commission (KACC), throwing into disarray investigations into the scam.

US: Indictment for Big Law Firm in Class Actions
by Julie CreswellThe New York Times
May 19th, 2006
The indictment is the first instance of a law firm with national reach facing criminal charges, and it could prove to be a fatal blow for the firm. The lawsuits cited in the indictment spanned two decades, occurring as recently as 2005, and generated some $216 million in legal fees for the firm.

US: Congressman's Condo Deal Is Examined
by JODI RUDOREN and ARON PILHOFERThe New York Times
May 17th, 2006
At the center of a federal inquiry into Representative Alan B. Mollohan, Democrat of West Virginia, is his real estate investment with a bankrupt distant cousin who touted his connections to one of Mr. Mollohan's nonprofit organizations to win work, including a federal contract in his district.

US: State sues tobacco company that 'cheated' Florida out of $17 million
by Missy StoddardSouth Florida Sun-Sentinel
May 17th, 2006
One of the country's largest tobacco companies has cheated the state of Florida out of $17 million, according to Attorney General Charlie Crist, and on Wednesday the state filed a lawsuit seeking to get what it's owed.

KOREA: South Korea to Indict Chairman of Hyundai
Reuters
May 16th, 2006
South Korea will indict the chairman of Hyundai Motor Co. today in a cash-for-favors scandal, prosecutors said Monday.

US: Boeing to Pay Fine of $615 Million
by Peter PaeThe Los Angeles Times
May 16th, 2006
Boeing Co. has reached a tentative agreement to pay $615 million to end a three-year federal probe into two high-profile Pentagon contracting scandals, the Justice Department said Monday.

KATRINA: Trailer deals go to Fluor ally
by James VarneyTimes-Picayune
May 9th, 2006
Through a partnership with a smaller, minority-owned company, a sprawling multinational firm whose federal contract for travel trailers was up for rebidding has landed four new deals that could be worth $400 million, federal records show.

US: CIA Nominee Linked to Bribery Scandal
by Justin RoodTalking Points Memo Muckraker
May 8th, 2006
While director of the National Security Agency, Gen. Michael V. Hayden contracted the services of a top executive at the company at the center of the Cunningham bribery scandal, according to two former employees of the company.

KATRINA: Complaints put FEMA trailer contracts on hold
by James VarneyNew Orleans Times-Picayune
May 5th, 2006
A batch of lucrative federal travel trailer contracts along the Gulf Coast has been put on hold, and other contracts could be in jeopardy, after three companies that lost a rebidding process lodged formal protests with the Government Accountability Office, according to federal attorneys handling the complaints.

KATRINA: Complaints put FEMA trailer contracts on hold
Times-Picayune
May 5th, 2006
A batch of lucrative federal travel trailer contracts along the Gulf Coast has been put on hold, and other contracts could be in jeopardy, after three companies that lost a rebidding process lodged formal protests with the Government Accountability Office, according to federal attorneys handling the complaints.

KATRINA: Storm contractors found to clean up in scams
by Larry MargasakAssociated Press
May 5th, 2006
While removing enough debris to cover Britain, contractors working on hurricane recovery have overbilled the government in a $63 billion operation that will get more expensive, according to a House report Thursday.

US: Katherine Harris in Hot Water Over Defense Contractor
Associated Press
May 4th, 2006
A political strategist who left U.S. Rep. Katherine Harris (news, bio, voting record)'s Senate campaign last month said Harris ignored her staff's recommendation to reject a defense contractor's $10 million appropriation request, now being challenged by a congressional watchdog group.

US: Red Lights on Capitol Hill
by Ken SliversteinHarpers
May 3rd, 2006
I reported last Thursday that Shirlington Limousine and Transportation, Inc., a firm allegedly used by defense contractor Brent Wilkes to provide prostitutes to ex-Rep. Duke Cunningham, is headed by a man who has a long criminal rap sheet and is also a contractor for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). It was Mitchell Wade, another defense contractor who has acknowledged bribing Cunningham, and who is cooperating with investigators, who reportedly told prosecutors about Shirlington's relationship with Wilkes and the latter's alleged pimping scheme. (Wilkes's attorney denies the charge.)

NETHERLANDS: The Dutch Try One of Their Own Over Links to Liberia
by Marlise SimonsThe New York Times
May 3rd, 2006
Mr. van Kouwenhoven, 63, is also charged with war crimes. He is accused of supplying Mr. Taylor with militia fighters from his lumber companies. He is further charged with violating a United Nations embargo by smuggling weapons into Liberia. His trial, held under a new mix of national and international law, is drawing attention because it is the second time a Dutch court is prosecuting a Dutch businessman for being involved with human rights abuses on another continent.

IRAQ: Huge fraud exposed in Iraq contracts
by Ewen MacaskillThe Age
May 2nd, 2006
The report says: "Corruption is another form of insurgency in Iraq. This second insurgency can be defeated only through the development of democratic values and systems, especially the evolution of effective anti-corruption institutions in Iraq."

MADAGASCAR: Rio's dirty washing is on show
by Jonathan KaplanThe Age (Australia)
April 18th, 2006
Environmental campaigner Andrew Lees battled Rio's mining interests in Madagascar, but now the bulldozers have arrived, writes Jonathan Kaplan.

US: Enron Prosecutor Questions Skilling's Story
by Vikas Bajaj and Alexei BarrionuevoThe New York Times
April 17th, 2006
A prosecutor tried to poke holes in the testimony of Jeffrey K. Skilling, the former Enron chief executive, today by boring in on stock sales he made in the months after he left the company and before the energy company declared bankruptcy.

IRAQ: Deceit by the truckload
by David Marr and Marian WilkinsonThe Sydney Morning Herald
April 15th, 2006
It is the greatest international scam in Australia's history: the inside story on the wheat board kickbacks.

US: The Enron Standard
by Lee Drutmantompaine.com
April 13th, 2006
In a Houston courtroom this week, former Enron CEO Jeffrey Skilling took the witness stand to plead his innocence, telling jurors that “My life is on the line.”

US: America's Fake News Pandemic
by Timothy KarrMedia Citizen
April 7th, 2006
A report released yesterday by the Center for Media and Democracy (CMD) and Free Press exposes corporate propaganda’s infiltration of local television news across the country.

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