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Four Blackwater Guards Found Guilty in 2007 Baghdad Killings
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
October 25th, 2014
A federal jury has found three former Blackwater contractors guilty of manslaughter and a fourth guilty of murder for killing 17 Iraqis in Baghdad's Nissour Square on September 16, 2007. The men were private security guards hired to provide security to U.S. government employees at the time.

Data Secrecy Company Accused of Sharing Information with Media and Military
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
October 18th, 2014
Whisper – a new social network that claims to provide anonymity – has been accused of secretly tracking users. The allegations were made by the Guardian newspaper, provoking renewed scrutiny of a multitude of data privacy claims made by software companies.

Facebook Changes Names Policy In Partial Victory for Privacy Activists
by Richard SmallteacherCorpWatch Blog
October 6th, 2014
Gay and transgendered performers have forced Facebook, the popular social network wesbite, to make changes to its “real names” policy to allow them to appear online under their stage names. The company has not, however, offered a way for people to keep their identities private

Kosmos Energy Prepares to Drill for Oil in Disputed Western Sahara
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
September 19th, 2014
Kosmos Energy, a Texas oil company, is preparing to drill for oil in Western Sahara, a disputed territory currently controlled by Morocco. The company has dispatched a state of the art oil rig to begin operations later this year, according to Western Sahara Resource Watch (WSRW), an activist group.

Ten Killed At African Barrick Operations in Tanzania
by Richard SmallteacherCorpWatch Blog
August 26th, 2014
As many as 10 people have been killed by police this year at African Barrick Gold's operations in Tanzania, according to a new report from two NGOs - MiningWatch Canada and Rights and Accountability in Development (RAID) in the UK.

Hacking Team Malware Targeted Saudi Arabia Protestors
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
June 27th, 2014
Malicious software from Hacking Team of Italy that can be used to spy on cell phones has been found by Citizen Lab activists to have been used to target people in Saudi Arabia. The software was bundled into a fake phone application for Qatif Today, a local news site.

G4S To End Israel Prison Contracts Following Protests
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
June 8th, 2014
G4S, the Anglo-Danish security contractor, has agreed to withdraw from prison work in Israel after activists disrupted the company annual general meeting for the second year in a row. The company is also under fire for ill-treatment of detainees in the UK, including the death of an Angolan man.

Pakistan Courts to Hear Lawsuit Against Finfisher Spy Software
by Rozali TelbisCorpWatch Blog
May 12th, 2014
A Pakistani court has set a June 5 court date to hear a lawsuit from ‘Bytes for All’ - a digital rights group - for the alleged use of FinFisher spy software by the Pakistani government. The software is manufactured by Gamma International, an Anglo-German company.

Barclays Temporarily Backs Down On Somali Money Transfers
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
April 21st, 2014
Dahabshiil, a Somali money transfer company, has won a temporary reprieve from Barclays, the last major bank to allow remittances to Somalia. The agreement comes just as a new report estimates that African expatriates lose $1.8 billion a year in transfer fees to companies like Moneygram and Western Union.

Cambodian Villagers Land Bulldozed for UDG Casino Complex
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
March 14th, 2014
Villagers in Koh Kong, Cambodia, say that their lands have been bulldozed by employees of the Union Development Group, a Chinese company, which is building a massive casino on a 45,000-hectare-land concession inside Botum Sakor National Park.

Hacking Team Spy Software Identified on U.S. Servers
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
March 7th, 2014
Two U.S. companies – Linode of New Jersey and Rackspace of Texas – have been hosting surveillance software designed by Hacking Team of Italy, according to a new report. The software was allegedly been used by governments in Ethiopia, Morocco, Turkey and the United Arab Emirates to track dissidents.

Thomson Safaris Sued Over Maasai Land Near Serengeti
by Richard SmallteacherCorpWatch Blog
March 3rd, 2014
Thomson Safaris, a Massachusetts company that runs the luxury Enashiva tourist camp near the Serengeti wildlife park in Tanzania, has been sued over 10,000 acres of land that the company allegedly acquired illegally from Maasai tribes.

Unpublished Audit of Kaloti Reveal Conflicts Over Gold Trade
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
February 28th, 2014
A whistleblower who previously worked for Ernst & Young, the international auditing firm, has alleged that his bosses turned a blind eye to discoveries that Kaloti Jewellery International – one of the world’s biggest gold companies - dealt in minerals from undocumented sources that may have included conflict zones.

Selling Your Secrets: The Invisible World of Software Backdoors and Bounty Hunters
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch/Tomdispatch
February 7th, 2014
Mass surveillance by the U.S. National Security Agency involves close partnerships with high-tech companies in order to gather data on everyday people. The agency has cut deals to install secret backdoors into computers; exploit flaws in popular software; and surreptitiously analyze personal data from smartphone games.

Mauritanian Villagers Protest Saudi National Prawn Company Investment
by Richard SmallteacherCorpWatch Blog
February 5th, 2014
Villagers in Boghé, a community 190 miles south west of the Mauritanian capital of Nouakchott, are protesting a proposed $1 billion investment by the Saudi National Prawn Company (NPC) in an aquaculture project in the Senegal river valley that will cover 31,000 hectares.

Bayer CEO Says Drugs Developed For “Western Patients Who Can Afford It”
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
February 3rd, 2014
Bayer, the German pharmaceutical giant, is in hot water after CEO Marijn Dekkers told a Financial Times conference that the company designed medicines “for western patients who can afford it” not for the “Indian market.” The company has been critical of the Indian governments efforts to make cheap generic drugs available locally.

Smartphone Game Data Targeted by NSA: Angry Birds Cited
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
January 28th, 2014
Millennial Media, a Baltimore based ad company, creates “intrusive” profiles of users of smartphone applications and games like Angry Birds, according to documents leaked to the media by whistleblower Edward Snowden. Such profiles have been exploited by intelligence authorities like the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA), say investigative journalists.

World Bank Slammed for Dinant Loan Linked to Honduran Killings
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
January 14th, 2014
An independent ombudsman has confirmed that World Bank officials should have raised serious questions before the International Finance Corporation (IFC) – the private sector arm of the World Bank – approved a $30 million loan to Corporación Dinant in Honduras in 2009 for palm oil plantation projects.

Cambodian Police Open Fire at Garment Workers Protest, Killing Four
by Richard SmallteacherCorpWatch Blog
January 3rd, 2014
At least four people were killed when Cambodian police opened fire on a garment workers protest in Canadia Industrial Park in Phnom Penh. The workers were demanding a minimum wage of $154 a month from employers who supply Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfiger brands as well as H&M.

Six Telecom Companies Face Formal Complaint for Collusion With UK Spy Agency
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
November 4th, 2013
Six global telecommunications companies - British Telecom, Interoute, Level Three, Verizon Enterprise, Viatel and Vodafone Cable - are the subject of a formal complaint by Privacy International for potential violation of human rights such as the right to privacy and freedom of expression.

Turning the Table on the Trackers: Wikileaks Sniffs out Spy Salesmen
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
September 6th, 2013
What was Mostapha Maanna of Hacking Team, an Italian surveillance company, doing on his three trips to Saudi Arabia in the last year? A new data trove from WikiLeaks reveals travel details for salesmen like Maanna who hawk electronic technology to track communications by individuals without their knowledge

Turkmenistan and Oman Negotiated to Buy Spy Software: Wikileaks
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
September 4th, 2013
Turkmenistan and Oman have been negotiating with a consortium of British, German and Swiss companies to buy “FinFisher” software to spy on phone calls and Internet activity of unsuspecting targets, according to a new trove of documents just released by Wikileaks, the global whistleblowing organization.

Glimmerglass Intercepts Undersea Cable Traffic for Spy Agencies
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
August 22nd, 2013
Glimmerglass, a northern California company that sells optical fiber technology, offers government agencies a software product called “CyberSweep” to intercept signals on undersea cables. The company says their technology can analyze Gmail and Yahoo! Mail as well as social media like Facebook and Twitter to discover “actionable intelligence.”

ACLU Reveals FBI Hacking Contractors
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
August 20th, 2013
James Bimen Associates of Virginia and Harris Corporation of Florida have contracts with the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to hack into computers and phones of surveillance targets, according to Chris Soghoian, principal technologist at American Civil Liberties Union's Speech, Privacy and Technology Project.

U.S. Maintains Aid for Contractors in Egypt, Despite Massacre
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
August 14th, 2013
Egyptian security forces launched a massive crackdown on pro-democracy protestors killing around 300 people this morning. Despite near universal condemnation for the violence, the U.S. government has refused cut off the multi-billion dollar aid program that pays companies to provide support to the Egyptian government.

Ethiopian Sugar Alleged to Destroy Pastoral Communities of Lower Omo
by Richard SmallteacherCorpWatch Blog
July 18th, 2013
Ethiopian Sugar Corporation is benefiting from forced resettlement of pastoral people in the Lower Omo Valley - a United Nations cultural heritage site - to make way for new sugar plantations and factories, according to a new report from the Oakland Institute.

Family Sues G4S For Killing Angolan Deportee
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
July 10th, 2013
The family of Jimmy Mubenga, an Angolan refugee in the UK, has brought a civil lawsuit against G4S, the world’s largest private security company. Mubenga died on October 12, 2010 while being restrained by G4S guards who were hired to help deport him from the country.

Rival Safety Agreements for Bangladesh Garment Factories Announced
by Richard SmallteacherCorpWatch Blog
July 8th, 2013
Two rival agreements that aim to improve safety in Bangladeshi garment factories were launched this week. The European-led Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh’s Garment Industry was launched Monday while the much weaker North American led Alliance for Bangladesh Worker Safety was launched Wednesday.

Edward Snowden and the National Security Industrial Complex
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch/IPS*
June 17th, 2013
Military contractor Booz Allen Hamilton is in the news over two of its former employees: Edward Snowden, the whistleblower, and James Clapper, U.S. intelligence czar. A review of Booz Allen's own high level conflicts of interest and shoddy work suggests that Congress should target the company, not the messenger.

Google & Facebook Discussed Secret Systems for U.S. to Spy on Users
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
June 8th, 2013
Google and Facebook have discussed – and possibly built – special portals for the U.S. government to snoop on user data, according to revelations sparked by an investigative series of articles by Glenn Greenwald of the Guardian.

Verizon (and Google) Helped U.S. Government to Spy on Reporters
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
May 23rd, 2013
Technology companies willingly provided information to U.S. government agencies to help the Obama administration snoop on reporters from the Associated Press and Fox news in order to ostensibly crack down on leaks that pose a “threat” to national security.

Guatemalan Lawsuit Against Canadian Mining Giant May Set Precedent
by Jennifer KennedyCorpWatch Blog
April 19th, 2013
A lawsuit against HudBay Minerals in Canada for human rights abuses in Guatemala is the next case to watch for corporate accountability activists after the U.S. Supreme Court rejected a case against Shell for aiding and abetting human rights abuses in Nigeria.

U.S. Supreme Court Dismisses Lawsuit Against Shell in Nigeria
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
April 17th, 2013
In a unanimous ruling, the U.S. Supreme Court dismissed a lawsuit against Shell in Nigeria for human rights abuses in the Ogoni region. The ruling effectively blocks other lawsuits against foreign multinationals for human rights abuse that have occurred overseas from being brought in U.S. courts.

Protests Against Posco Steel Plant Mount In India
by Freny ManeckshaCorpWatch Blog
April 14th, 2013
For over a month, villagers in the eastern Indian state of Odisha have been conducting a sit-in to demand the withdrawal of armed police officers at the site of a proposed $12 billion steel complex to be built by Pohang Iron and Steel Company (POSCO) of South Korea.

Capita Bungles Deportation of Irregular Migrants in UK
by Lily SmithCorpWatch Blog
February 18th, 2013
Capita, a UK outsourcing company, sent text messages to thousands of people in the UK, asking them to leave the country, as part of a privatized deportation scheme. Unfortunately hundreds of people that they targeted were in the country legally.

Nestlé Found Guilty of Spying on Swiss Activists
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
January 30th, 2013
Nestlé, the world’s largest food company, has been found guilty of spying on Swiss activists in 2003 with the help of Securitas, a private security company. Jean-Luc Genillard, president of the Lausanne civil court, told the two companies to pay $3,267.55 to each of nine victims.

“Cyberazzi” – Data Mining Companies Investigated for Invasion of Privacy
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
January 21st, 2013
The paparazzi hide in bushes and use telephoto lenses to snap pictures of celebrities. The “cyberazzi” parachute into web browsers and sneak up behind mobile phones to spy on ordinary people. Nine such data mining companies must report what personal information they gather for sale by next week.

Walmart Faces Increased Scrutiny Over Bangladesh Sweatshop Fire
by Puck LoCorpWatch Blog
January 7th, 2013
Walmart is coming under increased scrutiny for its ties to a garment factory in Dhaka where 112 workers were trapped and killed in a fire in late November 2012. The company, which buys $1 billion in clothing a year from Bangladesh, initially tried to deny any connection.

Deadly Conflict Over Honduran Palm Oil Plantations Spotlights CEO
by Jennifer KennedyCorpWatch Blog
December 31st, 2012
Miguel Facussé, the owner of Dinant Corporation in the Honduras, has come under scrutiny for the human rights abuses against farmers in the Bajo Aguán valley, where his company is cashing in on a boom in palm oil demand, fueled by loans from major donors like the World Bank.

Private Prison for Asylum Seekers on Pacific Island
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
September 17th, 2012
Transfield Services, an Australian logistics company that provides services to the mining and oil industry among others, has won a $25.9 million contract from the government of Australia to run a detention center for asylum seekers in the Pacific island nation of Nauru.

Cambodian Activists Call for International Sugar Boycott
by Puck LoCorpWatch Blog
September 11th, 2012
Human rights monitoring groups and Cambodian activists are calling for an international boycott of Tate & Lyle and Domino Sugar, who do business with sugar suppliers accused of participating in government-sanctioned land grabs and illegal evictions throughout rural Cambodia.

Obama Administration Backs Shell in Supreme Court Case
by Puck LoCorpWatch Blog
August 24th, 2012
The Obama administration is backing Shell Oil after abruptly changing sides in a landmark U.S. Supreme Court case that could make it even more difficult for survivors of human rights abuses overseas to sue multinational corporations in federal courts. The case will be heard on October 1.

Clash At Maruti Suzuki Car Factory Reflects Failures Of India, Inc.
by Freny ManeckshaCorpWatch Blog
July 30th, 2012
Hundreds of workers at a Haryana factory for India's biggest carmaker - Maruti Suzuki - are being rounded up by police after a violent clash left a manager dead. The incident has become a symbol of the clash between winners and losers in the country's economic boom.

Spies in Africa’s Skies: New Contractors for the Pentagon
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
June 18th, 2012
Sierra Nevada Corporation from Sparks, Nevada, and R-4, Inc. from Eatontown, New Jersey - are two companies at the forefront of the covert war in Africa, where they operate small Swiss aircraft to spy on behalf of the U.S. Special Operations Command.

Coffee Colonialism: Olam Plantation Displaces Lao Farmers
by Beaumont SmithSpecial to CorpWatch
June 4th, 2012
Olam International, a Singapore based multinational, is growing coffee for export in Paksong, southern Laos. The land for the plantation was seized by Sonesay Siphandone, the district governor, from the upland Nha Huen/Yahern community who have been left without food to eat.

Faking Happiness: Activists Strike Back at Vedanta Ad Campaign
by Freny ManeckshaCorpWatch Blog
May 30th, 2012
Vedanta Resources, a UK based mining and metals company with numerous projects in India, is attempting to claim to be social responsible via a huge advertising campaign. However activists have struck back by effectively using social media tools to counter Vedanta's claims.

Privatizing Asylum Housing: Serco and G4S Get UK Contracts
by Lily SmithCorpWatch Blog
May 8th, 2012
G4S and Serco – two private security contractors - have just been awarded multi-million pound contracts by the UK Borders Authority to provide housing to asylum seekers, edging out charities for the work. Activists are protesting, saying that G4S has a history of abusing immigrants and providing poor quality housing.

Glencore Allegedly Buys Copper From Ten Year Old Miners
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
April 17th, 2012
Children as young as ten in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, dig for cobalt and copper which they then sell to Switzerland-based Glencore, the world’s largest commodities company, according to a new BBC investigation.

Chiquita Banana To Face Colombia Torture Claim
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
March 30th, 2012
Chiquita, the global banana producer, was ordered to face a federal court over their role in paying off right wing death squads in Colombia that are alleged to have used “random and targeted violence” against villagers in exchange for financial assistance and access to Chiquita’s private port.

State of Surveillance
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch/The Bureau of Investigative Journalism
December 1st, 2011
A new cache of Wikileaks documents on the secretive surveillance industry uncovers 160 companies in 25 countries that make $5 billion a year selling sophisticated surveillance technology to security authorities around the world to secretly carry out mass surveillance of people via their phones and computers.

Nightmare on Christmas Island: Serco's Australian Detention Center
by Patrick O'KeeffeSpecial to CorpWatch
October 25th, 2011
Serco, a UK company, has a contract to manage the Christmas Island Immigration Detention Centre some 1,600 miles off the West Coast of Australia, which houses thousands of asylum seekers. The detainees at the overcrowded facility are experiencing serious mental health problems that union organizers say are a result of poor training and understaffing.

Indian Betel Farmers Battle South Korean Steel Giant
by Moushumi Basu with Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
August 30th, 2011
Farmers in Odisha are challenging POSCO, a South Korean steel giant. The confrontation is yet another David versus Goliath battle pitting “progress” against traditional agriculturists in a struggle to define development in India.

The True Cost of Chevron: An Alternative Annual Report
by Antonia JuhaszTrue Cost of Chevron
May 25th, 2010
Chevron's 2009 Annual Report celebrates 130 years of Chevron operations. We, the communities and our allies who bear the consequences of Chevron's offshore drilling rigs, oil and natural gas production, coal fields, refineries, depots, pipelines, exploration, chemical plants, political control, consumer abuse, false promises, and much more, have a very different account to offer.

ADM's New Frontiers: Palm Oil Deforestation and Child Labor
by Charlie CraySpecial to CorpWatch
May 18th, 2010
ADM has moved beyond the days of blatant price-fixing that landed its top execs behind bars. But the company's forays into new global agricultural markets bring charges of complicity in forced child labor and rampant deforestation. Critics assert that the conglomerate's embrace of self- regulation and voluntary guidelines is but a cynical ploy to deter effective reform.

Protesters in Eastern India Battle Against Mining Giant Arcelor Mittal
by Moushumi BasuSpecial to CorpWatch
March 2nd, 2010
In the rural, tribal lands of Eastern India, protesters are going head-to-head with world steel giant Arcelor Mittal. “We may give away our lives, but we will not part with an inch of our ancestral land," the villagers cry. "The forest, rivers and land are ours. We don't want factories, steel or iron. Arcelor Mittal Go Back.”

The Enbridge Oil Sands Gamble
by Andrew NikiforukSpecial to CorpWatch
December 14th, 2009
Patrick Daniel, the CEO of Enbridge Inc, is bullish about the future of unconventional oil from Canada’s massive tar sand deposits. His company not only operates North America’s longest crude oil and liquid pipelines, but transports 12 percent of the oil that the U.S. imports daily. Canada’s bitumen, or dirty crude, lies under a forest area the size of England and is arguably the world’s last remaining giant oil field.

Bhopal: Generations of Poison
by Nityanand JayaramanSpecial to CorpWatch
December 2nd, 2009
On the night of December 2-3, 1984, the Union Carbide pesticide factory in Bhopal, India leaked poisonous methyl iso cyanate into its densely populated neighborhood, killing 8,000 people in the immediate aftermath. 25 years later, Dow Chemical (which purchased Union Carbide in 2001) still refuses to clean up the site. But a new generation of Bhopal survivors is taking on the fight.

Black & Veatch's Tarakhil Power Plant: White Elephant in Kabul
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
November 19th, 2009
In a secluded valley a few miles from Kabul's international airport, $285 million in U.S. taxpayer dollars have flowed into a Black & Veatch-built power plant outside Tarakhil village. But, far from the public relations coup the project was intended to supply, the plant has run into problems with planning, cost over-runs and alleged corruption.

Uranium Corporation of India Limited: Wasting Away Tribal Lands
by Moushumi BasuSpecial to CorpWatch
October 7th, 2009
In Eastern India's Jharkand State, tensions are mounting between Indigenous tribal communities and the Uranium Corporation of India Limited, or UCIL. Heavy security at a May public hearing in Jadugoda prevented many local activists and villagers from entering. But outside the hearing, activists from the Jharkhandi Organization Against Radiation (JOAR) argued their case for protecting their health and the environment from horrific impacts of radioactive contaminated waste resulting from uranium mining.

Mission Essential, Translators Expendable
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
August 11th, 2009
Ohio-based Mission Essential Personnel supplies over 2,000 translators to the Pentagon in Afghanistan, who play a critical role in protecting local and military lives. These interpreters are a key communications link. But if they are wounded or killed, they are often left to fend for themselves. This special features video of CorpWatch interviews with three Afghan whistleblowers, recorded in country in April. Click through to hear their story.

Damming Magdalena: Emgesa Threatens Colombian Communities
by Jonathan LunaSpecial to CorpWatch
July 21st, 2009
Near the town of La Jagua, overlooking the Magdalena River, the landscape is dotted with concrete markers declaring the land, river, and everything else a “public utility” that Colombia has given to the energy company Emgesa as part of the Quimbo Hydroelectric Project. A construction permit was granted in May, with the dam scheduled for full operation by 2014.

The True Cost of Chevron: An Alternative Annual Report
by Antonia Juhaszhttp://www.TrueCostofChevron.com/
May 26th, 2009
Chevron's 2008 annual report is a glossy celebration of the company's most profitable year in its history. What Chevron's annual report does not tell its shareholders is the true cost paid for those financial returns, or the global movement gaining voice and strength against the company's abuses. This jointly-produced report documents negative impacts of Chevron's operations around the globe, in stark contrast to the message sent by the company's ubiquitous "Human Energy" advertising campaign.

Goa Cursed By Its Mineral Wealth
by Emily BildSpecial to CorpWatch
April 23rd, 2009
Set on India's west coast, Goa is renowned as a beach paradise popular with Indian and foreign tourists alike. Just a few miles inland from the quaint restaurants and the pristine waves lapping the silver shores of India's smallest state, iron-ore mining is destroying the environment, say activists and locals.

GEO Group, Inc.: Despite a Crashing Economy, Private Prison Firm Turns a Handsome Profit
by Erin RosaSpecial to CorpWatch
March 1st, 2009
While the nation’s economy flounders, business is booming for The GEO Group Inc., a private prison firm paid millions by the U.S. government. Behind the financial success and expansion of the for-profit security company, there are increasing charges of negligence, civil rights violations, abuse and even death.

Inheriting Halliburton's Army: What Will Obama Do With KBR?
by Pratap ChatterjeeTomDispatch.com
February 22nd, 2009
President Obama will almost certainly touch down in Baghdad and Kabul in Air Force One sometime in the coming year to meet his counterparts in Iraq and Afghanistan, and he will just as certainly pay a visit to a U.S. military base or two. Should he stay to eat with the troops, he will no less certainly choose from a menu prepared by migrant Asian workers under contract to Houston-based KBR, the former subsidiary of Halliburton.

Xstrata Dreaming: The Struggle of Aboriginal Australians against a Swiss Mining Giant
by Michael DeibertSpecial to CorpWatch
February 16th, 2009
The McArthur River winds through Australia’s remote Northern Territory, home to four main Aboriginal linguistic groups: the Gurdanji, Yanyuwa, Garawa and Mara. Earlier this month Australian Minister for Environment Peter Garrett announced conditional approval for a bid by Swiss mining giant Xstrata to expand its zinc mining operations in the sacred McArthur River floodplain.

One Million Weapons to Iraq; Many Go Missing
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
September 22nd, 2008
An Alabama company controlled by a billionaire Kuwaiti family is the biggest supplier of guns to Iraq. These weapons were paid for by the Pentagon which has lost track of them. A new Amnesty international report says that such unrestrained global arms trading schemes may have catastrophic human rights consequences.

Toyota: Auto Industry Race to the Bottom
by Barbara BriggsSpecial to CorpWatch
September 16th, 2008
Globally, Toyota is known for its innovation and quality of products like the Prius hybrid. A closer look at operations in Japan, the Philippines, Myanmar and the U.S. reveals a story of extreme working conditions, union-busting and other corporate abuses. In Japan and elsewhere, workers are speaking out.

Dark Side of the Tourist Boom: Cruise Ship Controversies Cross Borders
by Kent PatersonSpecial to CorpWatch
July 9th, 2008
The Mexican Pacific resort of Zihuatanejo recently cancelled a major new cruise ship terminal, giving a victory to environmental activists and other opponents. However, Mexico remains the world’s Number One cruise ship destination; and with little regulation, allegations of onboard crime, and increasing militarization as regards security while ships are in port, the rapidly expanding industry is facing new challenges.

A Glittering Demon: Mining, Poverty and Politics in the Democratic Republic of Congo
by Michael DeibertSpecial to CorpWatch
June 26th, 2008
In the DRC, a nation rich in natural resources yet confounded by civil war and endemic poverty, artisanal mining communities are struggling for their livelihoods as foreign multinationals like AngloGold Ashanti rush to cash in.

Crossing the Wayúu: Pipeline Divides Indigenous Lands in South America
by Jonathan Luna Special to CorpWatch
June 5th, 2008
Touted as the first step in a major regional integration project, the 225-kilometer TransCaribe pipeline travels underground across Colombia's Guajira Peninsula to the gas refineries of Maracaibo, Venezuela. Protesting the mega project's impacts on the peninsula's indigenous communities, the Wayúu community of Mashiis-Manaa is leading the struggle against oil giant Petróleos de Venezuela.

Suing the Smelter: Oklahoma Town Takes on Freeport
by Eliza StricklandSpecial to CorpWatch
May 15th, 2008
Residents of the town of Blackwell, Oklahoma have brought a class action lawsuit against mining giant Freeport McMoRan. The plaintiffs say that the company's zinc smelter, which closed in 1974, left a toxic legacy in the town, including contaminated sand from the smelter that was given away for free.

Booming Chinese Demand Has Ripples Down Under In Queensland
by Patrick O'KeeffeSpecial to CorpWatch
April 16th, 2008
A bauxite mine and a proposed refinery in northern Queensland, Australia, to be developed by a Chinese mineral company, has divided local and traditional landowners. Part of a major industrialization scheme, it has also sparked worries among environmentalists.

Smokestack Injustice? Toxic Texas Smelter May Reopen
by Kent PatersonSpecial to CorpWatch
April 2nd, 2008
The old American Smelting and Refining Company (Asarco) copper smelter in El Paso, Texas, which has spewed out toxins for over a century, has been granted a new five-year permit. This is despite the fact that it violates international laws by polluting communities on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border.

Ecuador's Yasuni Park: Oil Exploration or Nature Protection?
by Agneta EnströmSpecial to CorpWatch
March 20th, 2008
Permission for Petrobras of Brazil to drill for oil in Yasuni National Park, one of the most biologically diverse places in the world, has been suspended, but some damage has already been done by Swedish construction giant Skanska. Unless new money is found to protect the forest, exploration may resume.

Playing with Children's Lives: Big Tobacco in Malawi
by Pilirani Semu-BandaSpecial to CorpWatch
February 25th, 2008
Cigarettes may be damaging not only your own health, but also that of some of the world's poorest children. Much of Malawi's thriving tobacco industry rests on the backs of exploited children, some as young as five years old.

Burying Indonesia’s Millions: The Legacy of Suharto
by Andreas HarsonoSpecial to CorpWatch
February 15th, 2008
Over the last 50 years, a network of cronies helped former Indonesian president Suharto build a business empire and amass a multi-billion dollar fortune. Today his successors face an uphill battle to recover the money even after his death.

The Gunmen of Kabul
by Fariba NawaSpecial to CorpWatch
December 21st, 2007
The booming private security industry in Afghanistan has been the target of a number government raids in the last few months. One of the largest contractors -- United States Protection and Investigations (USPI) from Texas -- has been accused of corruption.

Titanium or Water? Trouble brews in Southern India
by Nityanand JayaramanSpecial to CorpWatch
October 24th, 2007
Tata, India's largest conglomerate, wants to take 10,000 acres of land to mine ilmenite in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu. The plan has sparked protests by local villagers who say the project will destroy their traditional way of life and the environment.

Mud and the Minister: A Tale of Woe in Java
by Anton FoekSpecial to CorpWatch
July 20th, 2007
Over a year after a torrent of liquid mud at an Indonesian oil exploration site inundated four villages, killing almost 100 people, the local community is still awaiting clean-up and proper compensation. This is despite the fact that the drilling company is owned by the family of a senior Indonesian minister.

Barrick's Dirty Secrets: Communities Respond to Gold Mining's Impacts Worldwide
May 1st, 2007
A new CorpWatch report details the operations of Barrick Gold in nine different countries, focusing on the efforts on the part of the communities to seek justice from this powerful multinational.
Download Spanish version of report

Barrick Gold Mine Transforms Pacific Island
by David MartinezSpecial to CorpWatch
February 21st, 2007
Papua New Guinea, one of the world's largest islands, has fortunes in gold under its lush green mountains and a diversity of indigenous culture. The arrival of a Canadian mining company has brought violent clashes and transformed the indigenous lands forever.

Listen to an interview with the author, David Martinez


This Alien Life: Privatized Prisons for Immigrants
by Deepa FernandesSpecial to CorpWatch
February 5th, 2007
In the wake of the September 11th attacks, the U.S. government invoked national security to sweep up and jail an unprecedented number of immigrants. Companies like Corrections Corporation of America and Wackenhut, have reaped the benefits.

High-Tech Healthcare in Iraq, Minus the Healthcare
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
January 8th, 2007
Almost four years after the toppling of Saddam Hussein, Iraq’s healthcare system is still a shambles. While most hospitals lack basic supplies, dozens of incomplete clinics and warehoused high-technology equipment remain as a testament to the failed U.S. experiment to reconstruct of Iraq. First in a series of CorpWatch articles.

A U.S. Fortress Rises in Baghdad: Asian Workers Trafficked to Build World's Largest Embassy
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
October 17th, 2006
Workers accuse the Kuwait contractor building the US embassy in Baghdad of smuggling low-paid South Asians into Iraq and labor trafficking. Still, the US State Department casts a blind eye on the complaints as it rushes to complete its most ambitious project ever.

A Translator's Tale
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
August 9th, 2006
Goran Habbeb was shot and left for dead by gunmen in Iraq for helping troops in counter-intelligence tasks. He worked for Titan, a military contractor, who supply translators to the military under a profitable multi-billion dollar contract. Almost 200 of their workers have been killed, the highest by far of any contractor in Iraq.

A Proxy Battle: Shareholders vs. CEOs
by Kevin KelleherSpecial to CorpWatch
June 13th, 2006
Earnest shareholder resolutions presented at company annual general meetings on everything from human rights to executive compensation are routinely shot down in flames. But shareholder resolutions may have an effect, even in defeat.

Stolen for Steel: Tata Takes Tribal Lands in India
by Nityanand JayaramanSpecial to CorpWatch
May 24th, 2006
The Tata Group, one of India's biggest and oldest multinationals, has taken over tribal land to build an enormous steel plant in Orissa. A clash between the traditional owners of the land and the police has resulted in numerous injuries and deaths, calling into the question the prestigious family-owned company's philanthropic image.

Australia Reaps Iraqi Harvest
by Marc MoncriefSpecial to CorpWatch
April 4th, 2006
United Nations sanctions against Saddam Hussein may have failed to end his regime but they succeeded in enriching both the Iraqi dictator and corporations able to manipulate the scandal-ridden world body's Oil-for-Food program. Among the profiteers was the Australian Wheat Board, a former state-owned monopoly, which funneled over $200 million into Saddam's coffers even as the “Coalition of the Willing” was preparing for invasion.

Baghdad Embassy Bonanza
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
February 12th, 2006
A controversial Kuwait-based construction firm accused of exploiting employees and coercing low-paid laborers to work in war-torn Iraq against their will is now building the new $592-million U.S. embassy in Baghdad.

Listen to an interview with David Phinney about this article on CorpWatch Radio.


Coca Farmer Wins Bolivian Election: New President to Challenge Multinationals
by Anton FoekSpecial to CorpWatch
December 28th, 2005
Evo Morales, an Aymara Indian who grew up in childhood poverty, has won the Bolivian presidential elections. He is part of a wave of leftists taking power in Latin America and challenging multinational corporations.

Vedanta Undermines Indian Communities
by Nityanand JayaramanSpecial to Corpwatch
November 15th, 2005
Vedanta, a fast growing British mining and aluminium production company founded by a billionaire expatriate Bombay businessman, threatens communities in India with environmental degradation and widespread pollution.

Mixing Occuption and Oil in Western Sahara
by Jacob MundySpecial to CorpWatch
July 21st, 2005
Oklahoma-based Kerr-McGee's contract with Morocco to explore for oil and gain in the contested territory on the Atlantic coast of northern Africa is complicating a 30 year independence struggle.

Barrick Gold Strikes Opposition in South America
by Glenn WalkerSpecial to CorpWatch
June 20th, 2005
A proposal to "relocate" three Andean glaciers to mine for gold has local people up in arms. This billion dollar development could destroy a major source of clean water on the border of Argentina and Chile.

Playing Chicken: Ghana vs. the IMF
by Linus AtarahSpecial to CorpWatch
June 14th, 2005
Thanks to the IMF and the World Bank, chicken and other local agriculture staples in Ghana are being replaced by subsidized foreign imports.

'Tis the Season for Shareholder Activism
by Jan FrelSpecial to CorpWatch
May 4th, 2005
Every spring, activists and investors attend annual general meetings to protest and meet face-to-face with CEOs and corporate boards. The goal is to place their agendas -- on everything from the environment to labor practices -- front and center.

Egyptian Asbestos Workers Dying of Cancer
by Aaron Glantz, Special to CorpWatch
January 13th, 2005
Workers at Aura-Misr, a Spanish-Egyptian asbestos company in Cairo, have been laid off since Christmas, after a ban on asbestos took effect in the country. Many of the fired workers have been diagnosed with cancer and they worry that other workers may soon fall ill and die also.

Dynamite in the Center of Town
by Joshua KarlinerSpecial to CorpWatch
December 2nd, 2004
In 1984 the world's largest industrial disaster killed 8,000 people over night in Bhopal, India. Two decades later, some sort of closure might seem called for. But today survivors groups continue to struggle for justice, while the chemical industry promotes volunteer initiatives.

Stalled Case Against ExxonMobil Sees Movement
by Jacqueline KochSpecial to CorpWatch
July 14th, 2004
After languishing in the courts for two years, a lawsuit that accuses ExxonMobil of complicity in human rights violations is beginning to move, thanks to the Supreme Court's recent decision to uphold the Alien Tort Claims Act.

Not in Their Backyard
by Jacqueline KochSpecial to CorpWatch
July 14th, 2004
Legal experts, activists, and analysts weigh impact of Supreme Court decision to uphold the Alien Tort Claims Act, commonly used by human rights groups to try cases against U.S. corporations on American soil.

Sweet and Sour
by Jim LobeSpecial to CorpWatch
June 23rd, 2004
A new report from Human Rights Watch reveals that American corporations such as Coca-Cola may be getting sugar from plantations in El Salvador that employ child labor.

Give War a Chance: the Life and Times of Tim Spicer
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
June 9th, 2004
Strange or villianous, Tim Spicer's business partners over the years, have found themselves in hot water from Canada to Papua New Guinea and Zimbabwe, although he has always somehow managed to avoid prosecution.

From Embassy Hero to Racing Disgrace
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
June 9th, 2004
In order to restore the reputation of the venerable British institution, in March 2002, Phipps launched dawn raids on five National Hunt trainers--including nine-time champion Martin Pipe--to investigate whether the trainers were illegally plying the horses with the blood-boosting drug erythropoieitin.

Ex-SAS Men Cash in on Iraq Bonanza
by Pratap Chatterjee
June 9th, 2004
Many of the best-paid private security contracts in Iraq are managed by a small group of British ex-soldiers who served in the Special Air Services (SAS), an elite regiment of commandos that is considered one of the best special force units in the world.

Controversial Commando Wins Iraq Contract
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
June 9th, 2004
A new Iraq contract to create the world's largest private army goes to a company run by Tim Spicer, a former officer with an elite regiment of British commandos who has a questionable track record.

Landmine of a Decision
by Michael McCrystalSpecial to CorpWatch
May 28th, 2004
Much is at stake for the people, economy, and environment of Namibia, where Rossing Uranium is deciding between ceasing operations or spending $100 million on a 20-year expansion of one of the world's largest mines.

Conservation at All Costs
by Shefa SiegelSpecial to CorpWatch
December 22nd, 2003
Conservation International is working to protect endangered species in Guyana, but in practice may have fomented conflict between tribes there.

The Troubled Marriage of Environmentalists and Oil Companies
Carmelo Ruiz-Marrero reports on CI's questionable partnerships.


Mapuche Lands in Patagonia Taken Over by Benetton Wool Farms
by Sebastian Hacher and Pauline BartoloneSpecial to CorpWatch
November 25th, 2003
To the Mapuche Indians in southern Argentina, the Italian clothing manufacturer Benetton is the newest conquistador in 10,000 years of land struggles in Patagonia.

Listen online here via FSRN!


Partial Chronology of Union Carbide's Bhopal Disaster
by Helene VostersSpecial to CorpWatch
May 15th, 2003
Dec. 2-3, 1984: Gas spill at the Union Carbide pesticide factory in Bhopal kills 8,000 in first three days. Over 120,000 injured.

Bhopal Survivors Confront Dow
by Helene VostersSpecial to CorpWatch
May 15th, 2003
Almost 19 years after the Bhopal gas disaster in India, survivors still seek Justice. Recently they confronted the CEO of Dow Chemical at a shareholders' meeting.

Dyncorp Rent-a-Cops May Head to Post-Saddam Iraq
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
April 9th, 2003
A major military contractor - already underfire for alleged human rights violations and fraud - may get a multi-million dollar contract to police post-Saddam Iraq.

Busting the Water Cartel
by Holly Wren SpauldingSpecial to CorpWatch
March 27th, 2003
A report from inside the World Water Forum on the showdown between water privatizers and human rights activists.

Indigenous Struggle in Ecuador Becomes a "Cause Beyond Control"
by Kenny BrunoEarthRights International
March 13th, 2003
Ecuador's government recently ruled indigenous opposition to Amazon oil development a "cause beyond control." That leaves the companies free to pull out. It could also be an excuse to step up repression.

West Coast Dockworkers: Victory in the Face of the Bush Doctrine
by David BaconSpecial to Corpwatch
January 2nd, 2003
West Coast Dockers negotiate a contract despite federal intervention on the side of business. But the Bush administration has fired a warning shot at labor.

September 11th Didn't Change Everything
by Kenny BrunoCorpWatch
September 10th, 2002
A New Yorker looks at the squandered opportunities to make desperately needed changes in the American psyche and global policy following last September 11th.

Women's Protests Against ChevronTexaco Spread Through the Niger Delta
by Sam OlukoyaSpecial to CorpWatch
August 7th, 2002
Women recently occupied ChevronTexaco facilities throughout the Niger Delta. Their initial demands have been met, but issues remain.

Afghan Pipe Dreams
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
June 28th, 2002
Is the US War on Terrorism in Afghanistan really a war for a natural gas pipeline? Fossil fuel corporations and the World Bank are expressing cautious interest. Activists are concerned.

Bhopal's Legacy
by Sandhya SrinivasanSpecial to CorpWatch
December 6th, 2001
Seventeen years after the Bhopal disaster, survivors still seek justice and environmental health regulations go unenforced.

G8: Are You Happy?
by Susan GeorgeSpecial to CorpWatch
July 24th, 2001
The movement for a different kind of globalization is in danger. Either we expose what the police are actually up to and prevent the violence of the few, or we risk shattering the greatest political hope in the last several decades.

The Promise of Porto Alegre
by Ignacio RamonetLe Monde Diplomatique
The new century is starting in Porto Alegre. All kinds of people, each in their own ways, have been contesting and critiquing neo-liberal globalisation, and many of them will be gathering in this southern Brazilian city on 25-30 January for the first World Social Forum. This time they won't just be protesting -- as they were in Seattle, Washington, Prague and elsewhere -- against the world-wide injustices, inequalities and disasters created by the excesses of capitalism (see the article by Bernard Cassen).

The Prison Industry: Capitalist Punishment
by Julie LightCorpWatch
October 28th, 1999
The CMT Blues scandal and the host of human rights and labor issues it raises, is just the tip of the iceberg in a web of interconnected business, government and class interests which critics dub the ''prison industrial complex.''

Mumia Abu-Jamal's Statement in Response to Supreme Court's Denial for New Trial
by Mumia Abu-JamalCorpWatch
October 4th, 1999
Mumia Abu-Jamal responds to Supreme Court decision not to hear his appeal.

MEXICO: Standing up for Health Rights on the Job
Special to CorpWatch
May 1st, 1999
First hand accounts of two workers who sued a San Diego-based medical manufacturer after a workplace accident.

MEXICO: University Professors Photos Draw the Wrath of Border Industrialists
by Julie LightSpecial to CorpWatch
April 29th, 1999
It wasn't just the politically provocative photographs that got Fred Lonidier's exhibit at Tijuana's public university taken down. It was the fact that he had the audacity to leaflet maquiladora workers outside the factory gates and invite them to the gallery that got his show yanked.

Masked Racism: Reflections on the Prison Industrial Complex
by Angela Y. DavisColorLines
September 1st, 1998
Long time scholar and activist Davis explains that locking up vast numbers of poor people of color "has literally become big business." She examines how corporate interest and institutional racism intersect.

Clinton's New ''No Sweatshop'' Agreement
by Tim ConnorCommunity Aid Abroad
September 22nd, 1997
In April this year, with much fanfare, US President Bill Clinton announced the introduction of a new ''No Sweatshop'' Code of Conduct for US Apparel and Footwear companies. The code is voluntary, but high profile companies like Nike Inc., Reebok International Ltd. and Liz Claiborne Inc. were among the ten initial signatories. These companies agreed that a set of minimum standards for working conditions in factories would be adhered to in the production of their goods -- wherever that production occurs.

Tom Beanal's Speech at Loyola University in New Orleans
Project Underground
May 19th, 1997
On May 23, 1996, Mr. Tom Beanal, leader of the Amungme Tribal Council and principal in a $6 billion suit against Freeport-McMoRan, spoke at Loyola University, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.

Freeport McMoRan's Corporate Profile
Project Underground
May 19th, 1997
Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Inc, headquartered in New Orleans, is one of the world's largest and lowest cost copper and gold producers, from its Grasberg mine in Irian Jaya. In 1996 it was regarded as one of the ten worst corporations by the Multinational Monitor magazine.

Global Gold Rush
by Joshua KarlinerCorpWatch
May 19th, 1997
Gold is an intoxicating substance. Witness the rapidity with which investors threw their money into a relatively obscure Canadian mining corporation called Bre-X, when that company claimed to have discovered the largest single deposit of the metal in history.

Profiting from Punishment
by Paul WrightPrison Labor News
March 1st, 1997
The co-editor of Prison Legal News, a Washington State prisoner himself, Wright reports on private companies, like Boeing, that are making out like bandits by using prison labor.