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Slick new corporate security operations around the world have replaced the mythical soldiers of fortune like "Mad Mike" Hoare, "Black Jacques" Schramme, and Bob Denard, mercenaries who drank hard, womanized, and wreaked havoc throughout Africa in the wars that followed independence from colonial rule. Today's mercenary is more likely to wear a business suit or stand guard outside over an oil pipeline. Companies like Defence Systems Limited guard British Petroleum's pipelines in Colombia, Dyncorp polices the Mexican border while Military Professionals Resources Incorporated trains US soldiers in Kuwait and Iraq in live-weapons fire.


Is The U.S. Military Too Reliant On Contractors?
by Rachel MartinNational Public Radio
October 26th, 2014
In war zones, private contractors can outnumber U.S. troops, but who controls them? NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with Stanford's Joseph Felter and journalist Pratap Chatterjee about current safeguards.

U.S. Contractors Convicted in 2007 Blackwater Baghdad Traffic Massacre
by Jim LobeInter Press Service
October 23rd, 2014
A federal jury here Wednesday convicted one former Blackwater contractor of murder and three of his colleagues of voluntary manslaughter in the deadly shootings of 14 unarmed civilians killed in Baghdad’s Nisour Square seven years ago.

Das Prism-Paradox
by Steffan Heuer und Thomas RamgeBrand Eins (Germany)
October 31st, 2013
Article in German about how Silicon Valley has profited out of the NSA. (Wenn sich die Entrüstung über den NSA-Skandal gelegt hat, wird die IT-Branche Kassensturz machen. Und feststellen: Die Aufregung hat sich gelohnt.)

Testimony Before the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
by Pratap ChatterjeeCenter for American Progress
July 7th, 2011
Testimony By Pratap Chatterjee, speaking for the Center for American Progress, before the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights on July 7, 2011

Struggling for Power in Afghanistan
by Glenn ZorpetteNew York Times
July 6th, 2011
A New York Times op-ed cites CorpWatch's expose of the problems at the Tarakhil power plant in Afghanistan

Testimony Before the Commission on Wartime Contracting in Iraq and Afghanistan
by Pratap ChatterjeeCenter for American Progress
May 5th, 2011
Testimony By Pratap Chatterjee, speaking for the Center for American Progress, before the Commission on Wartime Contracting in Iraq and Afghanistan on May 2, 2011

AFGHANISTAN: Maladies of Interpreters
by Joshua FoustNew York Times
September 21st, 2009
For most American troops, the only connection they have to the locals — whether soldiers in the Afghan army or villagers they’re trying to secure — is through their interpreters. Yet the way the military uses translators is too often haphazard and sometimes dangerously negligent.

Bush is gone, but Halliburton keeps cashing checks
by Pratap ChatterjeeSalon.com
June 3rd, 2009
All was remarkably staid as shareholders celebrated Halliburton's $4 billion in operating profits in 2008 at the company's recent AGM in Houston, a striking 22 percent return at a time when many companies are announcing record losses. At the same time, Sen. Byron Dorgan's Senate Democratic Policy Committee was holding a hearing on Capitol Hill focused on abuses by former subsidiary KBR.

Analysis: Dogs of War: Inherently governmental?
by David IsenbergUnited Press International
May 9th, 2008
Amid all the polemics over the use of private military and security contractors by the U.S. government there are two words one rarely sees, but they lie at the very heart of the debate: "inherently governmental."

Democracy Now!: Afghanistan Inc: New Report Says "Contractors Making Big Money for Bad Work"
by Amy GoodmanDemocracy Now!
October 5th, 2006
Amy Goodman of Democracy Now! speaks with Afghan-American journalist Fariba Nawa, author of a new report from Corpwatch, "Afghanistan Inc."

Watch or listen to the interview.


Asylum Seekers Protest Mitie Management of U.K. Detention Center
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
March 13th, 2015
U.K. asylum seekers have gone on hunger strike to protest living conditions at Harmondsworth immigration detention centre, which is run by Mitie, a British outsourcing company. The protests come months after Mitie took over from the Geo Group whose contract was canceled after prison authorities found repeated problems.

U.S. Government Buys Surveillance Technology To Track Drivers in Real Time
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
February 9th, 2015
Local government officials have the ability to track individual drivers in the U.S. in real time and take pictures of the occupants of their vehicles, with new “truly Orwellian” technology purchased from companies like Vigilant Solutions, according to new documents uncovered by the American Civil Liberties Union.

Firestone Tire's Role in Funding Liberian Warlord Revealed
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
November 19th, 2014
Firestone, a U.S. tire company, paid out millions of dollars to Charles Taylor, a Liberian warlord in the 1990s, despite knowing about his brutal human rights record, according to documents uncovered by ProPublica, an investigative journalism website. Taylor is now serving a 50 year prison sentence for war crimes.

Four Blackwater Guards Found Guilty in 2007 Baghdad Killings
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
October 26th, 2014
A federal jury has found three former Blackwater contractors guilty of manslaughter and a fourth guilty of murder for killing 17 Iraqis in Baghdad's Nissour Square on September 16, 2007. The men were private security guards hired to provide security to U.S. government employees at the time.

Hacking Team Malware Targeted Saudi Arabia Protestors
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
June 27th, 2014
Malicious software from Hacking Team of Italy that can be used to spy on cell phones has been found by Citizen Lab activists to have been used to target people in Saudi Arabia. The software was bundled into a fake phone application for Qatif Today, a local news site.

G4S To End Israel Prison Contracts Following Protests
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
June 8th, 2014
G4S, the Anglo-Danish security contractor, has agreed to withdraw from prison work in Israel after activists disrupted the company annual general meeting for the second year in a row. The company is also under fire for ill-treatment of detainees in the UK, including the death of an Angolan man.

KBR and Halliburton Can Be Sued For Iraq Toxic Burn Pits, Court Rules
by Fatima HansiaCorpWatch Blog
April 17th, 2014
KBR and Halliburton – two major U.S. military contractors – can be sued for the health impacts of trash incineration on U.S. soldiers who served in the war in Iraq, according to a new court decision that allows a series of 57 lawsuits against the companies to go forward.

Failed Cuban “Twitter” Project Designed By U.S. Government Contractors
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
April 8th, 2014
ZunZuneo - a now defunct social media platform similar to Twitter – was designed to undermine the Cuban government by two private contractors: Creative Associates International from Washington DC and Mobile Accord, a Denver based company. Funding was provided by the U.S. Agency for International Development.

Hacking Team Spy Software Identified on U.S. Servers
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
March 7th, 2014
Two U.S. companies – Linode of New Jersey and Rackspace of Texas – have been hosting surveillance software designed by Hacking Team of Italy, according to a new report. The software was allegedly been used by governments in Ethiopia, Morocco, Turkey and the United Arab Emirates to track dissidents.

Trafficking Lawsuit Against KBR for Wrongful Deaths in Iraq Dismissed
by Richard SmallteacherCorpWatch Blog
January 17th, 2014
Families of 12 Nepali workers killed in Iraq in August 2004 have been denied permission by a federal judge to sue KBR, the former subsidiary of Halliburton of Houston, in an abrupt reversal of a previous court decision.

The Jason Bourne Strategy: CIA Contractors Do Hollywood
by Pratap ChatterjeeTomdispatch.com
December 5th, 2013
Global Response Staff is a new unit set up by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency’s (CIA) to hire private security contractors to accompany dangerous spying missions. Unlike Jason Bourne - the fictional character on which they appear to be modeled on - this gang cannot shoot straight.

Six Telecom Companies Face Formal Complaint for Collusion With UK Spy Agency
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
November 4th, 2013
Six global telecommunications companies - British Telecom, Interoute, Level Three, Verizon Enterprise, Viatel and Vodafone Cable - are the subject of a formal complaint by Privacy International for potential violation of human rights such as the right to privacy and freedom of expression.

U.S. Security Checks Contractor Has Record of Rushing Investigations
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
September 27th, 2013
U.S. Investigations Services (USIS), the company that signed off on a background check into Aaron Alexis, the military contractor who shot 12 people dead on a U.S. Navy base in Washington DC last week, has a record of rushing investigations, according to a number of former employees.

Glimmerglass Intercepts Undersea Cable Traffic for Spy Agencies
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
August 22nd, 2013
Glimmerglass, a northern California company that sells optical fiber technology, offers government agencies a software product called “CyberSweep” to intercept signals on undersea cables. The company says their technology can analyze Gmail and Yahoo! Mail as well as social media like Facebook and Twitter to discover “actionable intelligence.”

ACLU Reveals FBI Hacking Contractors
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
August 20th, 2013
James Bimen Associates of Virginia and Harris Corporation of Florida have contracts with the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to hack into computers and phones of surveillance targets, according to Chris Soghoian, principal technologist at American Civil Liberties Union's Speech, Privacy and Technology Project.

U.S. Maintains Aid for Contractors in Egypt, Despite Massacre
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
August 14th, 2013
Egyptian security forces launched a massive crackdown on pro-democracy protestors killing around 300 people this morning. Despite near universal condemnation for the violence, the U.S. government has refused cut off the multi-billion dollar aid program that pays companies to provide support to the Egyptian government.

Family Sues G4S For Killing Angolan Deportee
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
July 10th, 2013
The family of Jimmy Mubenga, an Angolan refugee in the UK, has brought a civil lawsuit against G4S, the world’s largest private security company. Mubenga died on October 12, 2010 while being restrained by G4S guards who were hired to help deport him from the country.

Surveillance Contractor Bug In Ecuador Embassy Fails to Stop Wikileaks
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
July 3rd, 2013
Bugging equipment from the Surveillance Group Limited, a British private detective agency, has been found in the Ecuadorean embassy in London where Julian Assange, editor of Wikileaks, has taken refuge. The spy devices have so far failed to foil the whistle blowing group's daring exploits to support Edward Snowden.

Edward Snowden and the National Security Industrial Complex
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch/IPS*
June 17th, 2013
Military contractor Booz Allen Hamilton is in the news over two of its former employees: Edward Snowden, the whistleblower, and James Clapper, U.S. intelligence czar. A review of Booz Allen's own high level conflicts of interest and shoddy work suggests that Congress should target the company, not the messenger.

Google & Facebook Discussed Secret Systems for U.S. to Spy on Users
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
June 8th, 2013
Google and Facebook have discussed – and possibly built – special portals for the U.S. government to snoop on user data, according to revelations sparked by an investigative series of articles by Glenn Greenwald of the Guardian.

Mehadrin "Jaffa" Oranges May Come from Occupied Palestinian Land
by Puck LoCorpWatch Blog
April 4th, 2013
Jaffa oranges sold in European supermarkets labeled "Made in Israel" may have been grown and packaged in the occupied Palestinian West Bank, according to a report from the Boycott Divest Sanction (BDS) movement, an international coalition of Palestinian NGOs and activists.

Boeing Helps Kill Proposed Law to Regulate Drones
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
March 30th, 2013
Boeing, the aircraft manufacturing giant from Seattle, helped defeat a Republican proposal in Washington state that would have forced government agencies to get approval to buy unmanned aerial vehicles, popularly known as drones, and to obtain a warrant before using them to conduct surveillance on individuals.

Contractors Alleged to Abuse Alcohol, Drugs, Guns at Parties In Afghanistan
by Puck LoCorpWatch Blog
November 14th, 2012
Jorge Scientific Corporation, a military contractor with nearly a billion dollars in U.S. government contracts, is being sued by former employees for “shocking misconduct” in Afghanistan. The charges include illegal and reckless use of firearms, abusing alcohol and drugs and billing the government for property destroyed during raucous parties.

Payments to Saudi Generals Investigated in UK Military Contract Bribery Case
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
August 29th, 2012
A contract between a British subsidiary of European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company and Sangcom, the communications arm of the Saudi National Guard, is being investigated after Ian Foxley, a former project manager, blew the whistle.

TrapWire Leaks Shine Light on New Video Tracking Technologies
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
August 14th, 2012
TrapWire, am intelligence contractor founded and run by former CIA officers, offers to track “suspicious” activities from surveillance video footage. The company has been spotlighted in a new Wikileaks release.

Blackwater Pays Millions To Settle Arms Smuggling Charges
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
August 9th, 2012
Blackwater has agreed to pay the U.S. government $7.5 million to settle 17 federal criminal charges that include supplying guns to the king of Jordan and offering private security and military training services to South Sudan without a license.

U.S. Federal Agencies Targeted Employees With Commercial Spy Software
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
July 23rd, 2012
SpectorSoft spyware is the latest tool to be employed by some U.S. government officials to conduct surveillance on staff, The Florida company has been revealed to be selling “keylogger” software to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to track every digital move of certain employees.

United Nations, Olympics Accused of Using “Unaccountable” Private Security
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
July 13th, 2012
Two global institutions – the United Nations and the Olympic Games – face charges that they are using “unaccountable and out of control” private security contractors. One of the companies at the heart of both controversies is G4S, a private security company in the UK.

Spies in Africa’s Skies: New Contractors for the Pentagon
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
June 18th, 2012
Sierra Nevada Corporation from Sparks, Nevada, and R-4, Inc. from Eatontown, New Jersey - are two companies at the forefront of the covert war in Africa, where they operate small Swiss aircraft to spy on behalf of the U.S. Special Operations Command.

CIA "Rendition" Contractors Data Cache To Be Released
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
May 22nd, 2012
Details of 6,500 "extraordinary rendition" flights conducted by CIA contractors to transport over 1,100 victims to and from prison sites around the world are to be released by NGOs Reprieve Access Info Europe working in collaboration with Kent University and Kingston University in the UK.

U.S. Courts to Try Contractors for Torture at Abu Ghraib
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
May 17th, 2012
Two U.S. companies can be prosecuted for the alleged role of their employees in torture at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, a U.S. federal court ruled last week. The companies are CACI of Arlington, Virginia, which provided the interrogators at the prison, and L-3/Titan of New York city, which provided translators at the same location.

Cashing in on Terrorism
by Anna FeigenbaumCorpWatch Blog
April 24th, 2012
"Is Rioting a Form of Urban Terrorism?" The headline for a press release was a provocative introduction to the annual Counter Terror Expo in Olympia, London, which opens this week. (April 25 & 26) Eight thousand visitors are expected to descend on 400 exhibitions of counter-terrorism technologies and services.

Lockheed, General Dynamics Face UK Bank Boycott Over Cluster Bombs
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
April 10th, 2012
Lockheed Martin and General Dynamics of the U.S. face divestment from major UK banks, for manufacturing cluster bombs. The Guardian newspaper has exclusively reported that Aviva, the UK’s largest insurance company; Scottish Widows (part of the Lloyds Banking Group) and the Co-op Bank will sell shares in these companies, following a similar move by the Royal Bank of Scotland last year.

Militarizing the Middle East: Arms Shipments Continue Despite Abuses
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
March 21st, 2012
The U.S. sends weapons to Egypt, Russia sends weapons to to Syria and the European Union to Saudi Arabia, according to new reports from Amnesty and the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute. This is despite conclusive evidence that these weapons are being used for human rights abuse.

WORLD: Abolitionists Target Funds Behind Nuclear Arms Industry
by Thalif DeenInter Press Service
March 5th, 2012
The world’s nuclear weapons industry is being funded – and kept alive – by more than 300 banks, pension funds, insurance companies and asset managers in 30 countries, according to a new study by the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN).

State of Surveillance
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch/The Bureau of Investigative Journalism
December 1st, 2011
A new cache of Wikileaks documents on the secretive surveillance industry uncovers 160 companies in 25 countries that make $5 billion a year selling sophisticated surveillance technology to security authorities around the world to secretly carry out mass surveillance of people via their phones and computers.

SYRIA: US technology used to censor the Internet in Syria
by Pratap ChatterjeeThe Bureau of Investigative Journalism
October 23rd, 2011
Technology from a major Silicon Valley company, Blue Coat, is being used by the Syrian government to censor the Internet and monitor dissidents, according to activists. The equipment can be used to monitor users and block access to certain websites, such as social networking applications like Facebook and internet phone sites like Skype, which were key to the Arab Spring uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia

LIBYA: The minister, the Tory donor and a contract to supply oil
by Robert Winnett, and Rowena MasonThe Telegraph (UK)
September 2nd, 2011
An oil company whose chief executive has bankrolled the Conservatives won exclusive rights to trade with Libyan rebels during the conflict, following secret talks involving the British Government.

U.K.: Bell Pottinger acted for controversial Yemen organization
by Melanie NewmanThe Bureau of Investigative Journalism
September 1st, 2011
Bell Pottinger, the London-based public relations firm, has been working for Yemen’s National Awareness Authority, which is run by the nephew of Yemen’s president, Ali Abdullah Saleh. The organization has been accused of spreading propaganda on behalf of the government.

U.S.: N.Y. billing dispute reveals details of secret CIA rendition flights
by Peter Finn and Julie TateWashington Post
August 31st, 2011
Details of shadowy CIA flights to rendition prisoners in the war on terror to Guantanamo have emerged in a billing dispute between contractors.

LIBYA: Censorship Inc.
by Paul Sonne and Margaret CokerThe Wall Street Journal
August 30th, 2011
Amesys of France, VASTech of South Africa and ZTE Corp. of China provided technology to Libya that was allegedly used for the repression of Libyan citizens during the four decade rule of Colonel Gadhafi.

Subcontracting Substandard Services
by David IsenbergSpecial to CorpWatch
June 27th, 2011
Najlaa International Catering Services of Kuwait faces numerous complaints and court actions for non-payment of bills and alleged fraud for work conducted on U.S. military bases in Iraq. The allegations show that the Pentagon is still unable to manage subcontractors eight years after the invasion.

Billion Dollar Audit Missed by Pentagon Watchdog
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
August 30th, 2010
Military auditors failed to complete an audit of the business systems of Ohio-based Mission Essential Personnel even though it had billed for $1 billion worth of work over the last four years, largely done in Afghanistan.

U.S. Congressional Wartime Commission Targets Armed Contractors
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
June 23rd, 2010
This week, almost a decade after the U.S. "War on Terror" began, the Commission on Wartime Contracting held two days of hearings into the role of private contractors in conducting and supporting war. The Congressional witness table included Aegis, DynCorp and Triple Canopy. Curiously, Blackwater was not called; and the CEO of Torres Advanced Enterprise Solutions failed to appear.

LIBERIA: Hunting for Liberia’s Missing Millions
by Doreen CarvjalNew York Times
May 30th, 2010
How much money did Charles G. Taylor, the deposed president of Liberia, siphon out of his war-shattered country, and where is it? Investigators are developing a new strategy involving filing civil damage claims against companies, governments and international banks that they contend aided Mr. Taylor in illegal transactions.

US/AFGHANISTAN/PAKISTAN: U.S. Is Still Using Private Spy Ring, Despite Doubts
by Mark MazzettiNew York Times
May 15th, 2010
Top military officials continue to rely on a secret network of private spies set up by Michael D. Furlong, despite concerns about the legality of the operation. A New York Times review found Mr. Furlong’s operatives still providing information, with contractors still being paid under a $22 million contract, managed by Lockheed Martin and supervised by a Pentagon office.

KYRGYZSTAN: Kyrgyzstan investigating firms that sold fuel supplied to U.S. air base
by Walter Pincus Washington Post
May 5th, 2010
Kyrgyzstan's interim government has begun a criminal investigation of local companies that were sources of fuel supplied to the U.S. Manas air base in the Central Asian country, under Department of Defense contracts. Corruption allegations involving supplies to Manas have repeatedly surfaced in Kyrgyzstan and the United States.

Afghanistan, Inc.: A CorpWatch Investigative Report (2006)
by Fariba NawaSpecial to CorpWatch
April 30th, 2010
The recent boom in humanitarian aid has an underbelly largely invisible to charity sector outsiders. “Easy money: the great aid scam," packs a biting critique (Linda Polman, The Sunday Times Online, April 25). In 2006, CorpWatch’s "Afghanistan, Inc.", cited by Polman, drilled down on reconstruction dollars, in what’s become known as “Afghaniscam.” We bring our report to you again.

US: Senators Call For Changes to Troubled, Costly Afghan Police Training Program
by Ryan KnutsenProPublica
April 15th, 2010
State and Defense department officials took a tongue-lashing today, trying to explain to a Senate subcommittee how the government has poured $6 billion since 2002 into building an effective Afghan police force with disastrous results.

IRAQ/US: Panel says firms need U.S. guidance to reduce contractors in Iraq
by Dana HedgpethWashington Post
April 1st, 2010
The U.S. government is probably paying contractors millions of dollars for unnecessary work in Iraq because the military is not giving companies clear enough guidance about reducing their employees, officials on the Commission on Wartime Contracting said Monday.

AFGHANISTAN: Policing Afghanistan: How Afghan Police Training Became a Train Wreck
by Pratap ChatterjeeTom Dispatch
March 21st, 2010
The Pentagon faces a tough choice: Should it award a billion-dollar contract for training the Afghan National Police to Xe (formerly Blackwater), a company made infamous when its employees killed 17 Iraqis in Baghdad in 2007, or to DynCorp, a company made infamous in Bosnia in 1999 when some of its employees were caught trafficking young girls for sex?

AFGHANISTAN/US: Outsourcing intelligence
by David IgnatiusWashington Post
March 17th, 2010
The headline read like something you might see in the conspiracy-minded Pakistani press: "Contractors Tied to Effort to Track and Kill Militants." But the story appeared in Monday's New York Times, and it highlighted some big problems that have developed in the murky area between military and intelligence activities.

Afghanistan Spy Contract Goes Sour for Pentagon
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
March 16th, 2010
Mike Furlong, a top Pentagon official, is alleged to have hired a company called International Media Ventures to supply information for drone strikes and assassinations in Afghanistan and Pakistan, according to a complaint filed by the CIA and revealed by the New York Times on March 15.

AFGHANISTAN/US: Contractors Tied to Effort to Track and Kill Militants
by DEXTER FILKINS and MARK MAZZETTINew York Times
March 15th, 2010
Under the cover of a benign government information-gathering program, a Defense Department official set up a network of private contractors in Afghanistan and Pakistan to help track and kill suspected militants, according to military officials and businessmen in Afghanistan and the United States. The official, Michael D. Furlong, hired contractors from private security companies that employed former C.I.A. and Special Forces operatives.

Inspector General reports confirm CorpWatch story on Afghan power plant
by Pratap Chatterjee
February 9th, 2010

AFGHANISTAN: Iraq Lessons Ignored at Kabul Power Plant
by Pratap ChatterjeeInter Press News Service
February 4th, 2010
A diesel-fueled power plant, nearing completion just outside Kabul, demonstrates that the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and its contractors have failed to learn lessons from identical mistakes in Iraq, despite clearly signposted advice from oversight agencies.

US: Obama's Budget Calls for Billions in New Spending for Drones
by Jason LeopoldTruthout
February 2nd, 2010
Shares of major US defense contractors including Boeing, General Dynamics, and Northrop Grumman rose upon the unveiling of President Barack Obama's fiscal year 2011 spending plan for the Pentagon, part of the president's overall $3.8 trillion budget proposal. More than $2 billion will be used to purchase unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones, blamed for a significant rise in civilian casualties in the "war on terror."

Agility Attempts to Vault Fraud Charges
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
February 1st, 2010
Agility, a Kuwait-based multi-billion dollar logistics company spawned by the U.S. invasion of Iraq, is facing criminal charges for over-billing the U.S. taxpayer on more than $8.5 billion worth of food supply contracts in the Iraq war zone. If the lawsuit is successful, the company could owe the U.S. government as much as $1 billion.

US/KUWAIT: Settlement possible in military contractor fraud case
by Bill RankinAtlanta Journal-Constitution
January 29th, 2010
Kuwaiti firm Agility (formerly Public Warehousing) indicted here for overcharging the Army on an $8.5 billion contract is negotiating a possible settlement with the Justice Department. On Nov. 9, a federal grand jury in Atlanta indicted the firm on charges it gouged the U.S. government by overcharging on its contract to supply food to American troops in Iraq.

US: F.B.I. Charges Arms Sellers With Foreign Bribes
by Diana B. HenriquesNew York Times
January 20th, 2010
On Tuesday, 22 top-level arms industry executives, including a senior sales executive at Smith & Wesson, were arrested in what Justice Department officials called the first undercover sting ever aimed at violations of the federal ban on corporate bribes paid to get foreign business. The individuals are being prosecuted under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.

US/IRAQ: U.S. Companies Join Race on Iraqi Oil Bonanza
by TIMOTHY WILLIAMSNew York Times
January 13th, 2010
American companies have been arriving in Iraq to pursue an expected multibillion-dollar bonanza of projects to revive the country’s petroleum industry. But there are questions about the Iraqi government’s capacity to police the companies. “These are for-profit concerns and they are trying to make as much money as they can,” said Pratap Chatterjee of CorpWatch.

NIGERIA: Ex-militant leader heads SPDC’s patrol team
by Chris EjimNigerian Compass
January 8th, 2010
Authorities of Shell Petroleum Development Company (SPDC) have unveiled a new security strategy for securing oil pipelines and platforms within the Niger Delta region. Shell has appointed former MEND militant commander, Eris Paul, and his company, Eristex Pipeline Patrol, to secure oil facilities in the Southern Ijaw area of the Delta.

US: Judge dismisses all charges in Blackwater shooting
by Associated PressLos Angeles Times
December 31st, 2009
A federal judge has dismissed all charges against five Blackwater Worldwide security guards charged in a deadly Baghdad shooting.

AFGHANISTAN: Lost in Limbo: Injured Afghan Translators Struggle to Survive
by Pratap ChatterjeeProPublica
December 17th, 2009
Local translators are hidden casualties of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The U.S. military uses defense contractors to hire local residents to serve as translators for the troops. These local translators often live, sleep and eat with soldiers. And yet when they are wounded, they are often ignored by the U.S. system designed to provide them medical care and disability benefits, according to an investigation by the Los Angeles Times and ProPublica.

JORDAN: For AIG’s Man in Jordan, War Becomes a Business Opportunity
by T. Christian MillerProPublica
December 17th, 2009
For Emad Hatabah, the war in Iraq became a business opportunity. As AIG's chief representative in Jordan, he was responsible for coordinating the care for hundreds of Iraqis who had been injured while working under contract for U.S. troops. He fulfilled his functions by sending business to himself, his friends and business associates, according to interviews and records.

US: Up to 56,000 more contractors likely for Afghanistan
by Walter Pincus Washington Post
December 16th, 2009
The surge of 30,000 U.S. troops into Afghanistan could be accompanied by a surge of up to 56,000 contractors, vastly expanding the presence of personnel from the U.S. private sector in a war zone, according to a study by the Congressional Research Service.

US: Blackwater Guards Tied to Secret C.I.A. Raids
by JAMES RISEN and MARK MAZZETTINew York Times
December 10th, 2009
Private security guards from Blackwater Worldwide participated in some of the C.I.A.’s most sensitive activities — clandestine raids with agency officers against people suspected of being insurgents in Iraq and Afghanistan and the transporting of detainees, according to former company employees and intelligence officials.

IRAQ: Oil Companies Look to the Future
by Timothy WilliamsNew York Times
December 2nd, 2009
More than six and a half years after the United States-led invasion here that many believed was about oil, the major oil companies are finally gaining access to Iraq’s petroleum reserves. But they are doing so at far less advantageous terms than they once envisioned. The companies seem to have calculated that it is worth their while to accept deals with limited profit opportunities now, in order to cash in on more lucrative development deals in the future.

US: DynCorp Fires Executive Counsel
by August ColeWall Street Journal
November 28th, 2009
DynCorp International Inc. said it has terminated one of its top lawyers, a move that comes on the heels of the government contractor's disclosure that some of its subcontractors may have broken U.S. law in trying to speed up getting licenses and visas overseas.

IRAQ: The Pentagon Garrisons the Gulf: As Washington Talks Iraq Withdrawal, the Pentagon Builds Up Bases in the Region
by Nick TurseTomDispatch.com
November 22nd, 2009
Despite recent large-scale insurgent suicide bombings that have killed scores of civilians and the fact that well over 100,000 U.S. troops are still deployed in that country, coverage of the U.S. war in Iraq has been largely replaced in the mainstream press by the (previously) "forgotten war" in Afghanistan. Getting out of Iraq, however, doesn't mean getting out of the Middle East.

Black & Veatch's Tarakhil Power Plant: White Elephant in Kabul
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
November 19th, 2009
In a secluded valley a few miles from Kabul's international airport, $285 million in U.S. taxpayer dollars have flowed into a Black & Veatch-built power plant outside Tarakhil village. But, far from the public relations coup the project was intended to supply, the plant has run into problems with planning, cost over-runs and alleged corruption.

AFGHANISTAN: Paying Off the Warlords, Anatomy of an Afghan Culture of Corruption
by Pratap ChatterjeeTomDispatch.com
November 17th, 2009
Among the dozens of businesses with lucrative Afghan and U.S. taxpayer-financed reconstruction deals are two extremely well connected companies -- Ghazanfar and Zahid Walid -- that helped to swell the election coffers of President Hamid Karzai as well as the family business of his running mate, the country's new vice president, warlord Mohammed Qasim Fahim.

Spies for Hire: New Online Database of U.S. Intelligence Contractors
by Tim ShorrockSpecial to CorpWatch
November 16th, 2009
CorpWatch joins with Tim Shorrock today, the first journalist to blow the whistle on the privatization of U.S. intelligence, in releasing Spies for Hire.org, a groundbreaking database focusing on the dozens of corporations that provide classified intelligence services to the United States government.

FRANCE: France jails 'Angolagate' power players
by Pascale JuilliardThe Times Online (South Africa)
October 27th, 2009
A French court slapped jail terms Tuesday on the main players in a network that smuggled arms to war-torn Angola and included an ex-minister and the son of the late president Francois Mitterrand.

Uranium Corporation of India Limited: Wasting Away Tribal Lands
by Moushumi BasuSpecial to CorpWatch
October 7th, 2009
In Eastern India's Jharkand State, tensions are mounting between Indigenous tribal communities and the Uranium Corporation of India Limited, or UCIL. Heavy security at a May public hearing in Jadugoda prevented many local activists and villagers from entering. But outside the hearing, activists from the Jharkhandi Organization Against Radiation (JOAR) argued their case for protecting their health and the environment from horrific impacts of radioactive contaminated waste resulting from uranium mining.

US: Despite Slump, U.S. Role as Top Arms Supplier Grows
by Thom ShankerNew York Times
September 6th, 2009
Despite a recession that knocked down global arms sales last year, the United States expanded its role as the world’s leading weapons supplier, increasing its share to more than two-thirds of all foreign armaments deals, according to a new Congressional study.

AFGHANISTAN: Wackenhut aids inquiry into its Afghanistan contractor
http://www.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/asiapcf/09/03/afghanistan.contractors/
September 3rd, 2009
This week the Project on Government Oversight released damning allegations of deviant hazing at a camp for security guards in Afghanistan. Sparking questions from the State Department, POGO warned the problems are "posing a significant threat to the security of the embassy and its personnel."

AFGHANISTAN: Wackenhut aids inquiry into its Afghanistan contractor
http://www.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/asiapcf/09/03/afghanistan.contractors/
September 3rd, 2009
This week the Project on Government Oversight released damning allegations of deviant hazing at a camp for security guards in Afghanistan. Sparking questions from the State Department, POGO warned the problems are "posing a significant threat to the security of the embassy and its personnel."

AFGHANISTAN: Wackenhut aids inquiry into its Afghanistan contractor
CNN.com
September 3rd, 2009
This week the Project on Government Oversight released damning allegations of deviant hazing at a camp for security guards in Afghanistan. Sparking questions from the State Department, POGO warned the problems are "posing a significant threat to the security of the embassy and its personnel."

CorpWatch Bribery Report Helps Spark Dutch Inquiry
by Anton Foek
August 20th, 2009

US: New Hire Highlights Altegrity's Growing Ambition
by Thomas HeathWashington Post
August 17th, 2009
For more than 12 years, Falls Church-based USIS quietly scrutinized the backgrounds of individuals who needed security clearance to work in the U.S. government or in the private sector. Now re-named Altegrity, the company has ambitions of securing government contracts for much more than investigation and data-collection.

US: DynCorp Billed U.S. $50 Million Beyond Costs in Defense Contract
by V. Dion HaynesWashington Post
August 12th, 2009
A Defense Department auditor, appearing before the Commission on Wartime Contracting in Iraq and Afghanistan, testified Tuesday that DynCorp International billed the government $50 million more than the amount specified in a contract to provide dining facilities and living quarters for military personnel in Kuwait.

Mission Essential, Translators Expendable
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
August 11th, 2009
Ohio-based Mission Essential Personnel supplies over 2,000 translators to the Pentagon in Afghanistan, who play a critical role in protecting local and military lives. These interpreters are a key communications link. But if they are wounded or killed, they are often left to fend for themselves. This special features video of CorpWatch interviews with three Afghan whistleblowers, recorded in country in April. Click through to hear their story.

US: Cash-rich SAIC hits the acquisition trail
by Sami LaisWashington Technology
August 6th, 2009
Making a big splash in recent weeks, Science Applications International Corp. bought two companies, adding new capabilities in cybersecurity, energy and disaster recovery — areas in which government spending is expected to grow.

Damming Magdalena: Emgesa Threatens Colombian Communities
by Jonathan LunaSpecial to CorpWatch
July 21st, 2009
Near the town of La Jagua, overlooking the Magdalena River, the landscape is dotted with concrete markers declaring the land, river, and everything else a “public utility” that Colombia has given to the energy company Emgesa as part of the Quimbo Hydroelectric Project. A construction permit was granted in May, with the dam scheduled for full operation by 2014.

PAKISTAN: Attack in Pakistani Garrison City Raises Anxiety About Safety of Nuclear Labs and Staff
by Salman MasoodNew York Times
July 4th, 2009
A suicide attack Thursday in Rawalpindi was the first that singled out workers of Pakistan’s prized nuclear labs. Military analysts said they were from the Kahuta Research Laboratories, where weapons-grade uranium is produced. The lab was once run by Abdul Qadeer Khan, the father of Pakistan’s nuclear program and one of the most successful nuclear proliferators in history.

IRAQ: Big Oil Ready for Big Gamble in Iraq
by Gina ChonWall Street Journal
June 24th, 2009
Next week, Iraqi officials will auction off oil contracts to foreign companies for the first time since Iraq nationalized its oil industry three decades ago. Some 120 companies expressed interest in bidding for the contracts, and thirty-five companies qualified. They include Exxon Mobil Corp., Royal Dutch Shell PLC, Italy's Eni SpA, Russia's Lukoil and China Petroleum & Chemical Corp., or Sinopec.

IRAN: Iran's Web Spying Aided By Western Technology
by Christopher Rhoads and Loretta ChaoWall Street Journal
June 22nd, 2009
The Iranian regime has developed one of the world's most sophisticated mechanisms for controlling and censoring the Internet. The Iranian government appears to be engaging in a practice often called deep packet inspection. The monitoring capability was provided, at least in part, by a joint venture of Siemens AG, the German conglomerate, and Nokia Corp., the Finnish cellphone company.

Is Halliburton Forgiven and Forgotten? Or How to Stay Out of Sight While Profiting From the War in Iraq
by Pratap ChatterjeeTomDispatch.com
June 3rd, 2009
At Halliburton's recent annual shareholders meeting in Houston, all was remarkably staid as the company celebrated its $4 billion in 2008 operating profits, a striking 22% return at a time when many companies are announcing record losses. Just three months ago, however, Halliburton didn't hesitate to pay $382 million in fines to the U.S. Department of Justice as part of the settlement of a controversial KBR gas project in Nigeria in which the company admitted to paying a $180 million bribe to government officials.

US: Contractors Vie for Plum Work, Hacking for U.S. Government
by CHRISTOPHER DREW and JOHN MARKOFFNew York Times
May 30th, 2009
The Obama administration’s push into cyberwarfare has set off a rush among the biggest military companies for billions of dollars in new defense contracts. Nearly all of the largest military companies — including Northrop Grumman, General Dynamics, Lockheed Martin and Raytheon — have major cyber contracts with the military and intelligence agencies.

US: Chevron annual meeting heats up over Ecuador suit
by Jordan RobertsonWashington Post
May 27th, 2009
In a combative and sometimes colorful annual meeting, Chevron's CEO and chairman exchanged barbs with activists over pollution in the Amazon rain forest and the company's human rights record. The nation's second-largest oil company is awaiting a verdict from a judge in Ecuador that could come with a $27 billion price tag.

US: U.S. Cracks Down on Corporate Bribes
by DIONNE SEARCEYWall Street Journal
May 26th, 2009
The Justice Department is increasing its prosecutions of alleged acts of foreign bribery by U.S. corporations, forcing them to take costly steps to defend against scrutiny. The crackdown under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, or FCPA -- a post-Watergate law largely dormant for decades -- now extends across five continents and penetrates entire industries.

The True Cost of Chevron: An Alternative Annual Report
by Antonia Juhaszhttp://www.TrueCostofChevron.com/
May 26th, 2009
Chevron's 2008 annual report is a glossy celebration of the company's most profitable year in its history. What Chevron's annual report does not tell its shareholders is the true cost paid for those financial returns, or the global movement gaining voice and strength against the company's abuses. This jointly-produced report documents negative impacts of Chevron's operations around the globe, in stark contrast to the message sent by the company's ubiquitous "Human Energy" advertising campaign.

FRANCE/UAE: Gulf base shows shift in France’s focus
by Ben Hall and Andrew EnglandFinancial Times
May 25th, 2009
France's new naval base in Abu Dhabi, its first overseas military base in 50 years, has sparked a round of lobbying on behalf of lucrative business for French companies including Dassault, the military aircraft maker, and a consortium of Total, GdF-Suez and Areva, which is bidding to build two nuclear power stations in the UAE. Dassault is hoping to sell as many as 60 of its Rafale fighters to the UAE.

Mexico’s Other Crisis: Foreign Banks
by Kent PatersonSpecial to CorpWatch
May 15th, 2009
The worldwide financial crisis is hitting people in the Global South with particular venom, and disaster profiteering is alive and well. Take Mexico. While entities like Citigroup-owned Banamex get away with charging Mexican credit account-holders usurious interest rates of up to 100 percent, Banamex itself turned nearly $1 billion in profits in 2008.

WORLD: When Chevron Hires Ex-Reporter to Investigate Pollution, Chevron Looks Good
by Brian StelterNew York Times
May 10th, 2009
When Chevron learned that “60 Minutes” was preparing a potentially damaging report about oil company contamination of the Amazon rain forest in Ecuador, it hired a former journalist to produce a mirror image of the report, from the corporation’s point of view. An Ecuadorean judge is expected to rule soon on whether Chevron owes up to $27 billion in damages.

IRAN/CHINA: Iranians and Others Outwit Net Censors
by John MarkoffNew York Times
April 30th, 2009
The Internet is no longer just an essential channel for commerce, entertainment and information. It has also become a stage for state control — and rebellion against it. Computers are becoming more crucial in global conflicts, not only in spying and military action, but also in determining what information reaches people around the globe.

US: Prison company to pay $42.5 million in beating death
by John MacCormackSan Antonio Express News
April 8th, 2009
In a searing opinion, the 13th Court of Appeals has upheld $42.5 million in punitive damages against private prison operator Wackenhut Corrections Corp., now the Geo Group,for the “horrific and gruesome death” of inmate Gregorio De La Rosa Jr. in 2001.

US: Contracting Boom Could Fizzle Out
by Dana HedgpethWashington Post
April 7th, 2009
The surge in the U.S. military contracting workforce would ebb under Defense Secretary Gates's budget proposal as the Pentagon moves to replace private workers with full-time civil servants. The move could affect companies such as CACI and SAIC. "We are right-sizing the defense acquisition workforce so we can improve our contract oversight and get a better deal for the taxpayers," said the Pentagon's director of defense procurement and acquisition policy.

US: Gates Proposes Major Changes to Military Programs, Weapons Buys
by August ColeWall Street Journal
April 6th, 2009
Defense Secretary Robert Gates unveiled a sweeping overhaul of the Pentagon's top weapons priorities. The shake-up, a combination of defense contract cutbacks and policy changes, will stoke a smoldering debate in Congress, with cuts proposed for Lockheed Martin Corp.'s F-22 Raptor and replacement of the president's fleet of Marine One helicopters.

IRAQ: Ex-Blackwater Workers May Return to Iraq Jobs
by Rod NordlandNew York Times
April 3rd, 2009
Late last month Blackwater Worldwide lost its billion-dollar contract to protect American diplomats in Iraq, but by next month many of its private security guards will be back on the job here. The same individuals will just be wearing new uniforms, working for Triple Canopy, the firm that won the State Department’s new contract.

US: Pentagon Weighs Cuts and Revisions of Weapons
by Christopher DrewNew York Times
April 3rd, 2009
U.S. defense executives and consultants are worried about the sweeping changes in military programs that Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates is expected to announce on Monday. Weapons systems like missile defense are likely to endure deep cuts.

Policing Afghanistan: Obama's New Strategy
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
March 23rd, 2009
A new strategy for Afghanistan and Pakistan will be unveiled by President Barack Obama this week. It plans to ramp up the training of the Afghan army and police at a cost of some $2 billion a year. Private contractor DynCorp is already lining up to bid for some of the lucrative contracts. This article provides an overview of key reports assessing the training of the Afghan police, and DynCorp's role, to date.

US/AFGHANISTAN: Unknown Afghanistan
by Pratap ChatterjeeTomDispatch.com
March 17th, 2009
Want a billion dollars in development aid? If you happen to live in Afghanistan, the two quickest ways to attract attention and so aid from the U.S. authorities are: Taliban attacks or a flourishing opium trade. For those with neither, the future could be bleak. This piece take a look at the lack of reconstruction aid in areas like Bamiyan, Afghanistan.

US: Is the Next Defense Budget a Stimulus Package? Why the Pentagon Can't Put America Back to Work
by Frida BerriganTomDispatch.com
March 12th, 2009
At the end of February, the defense industry received its own special stimulus package -- news of the dollars available for the Pentagon budget in 2010; and at nearly $700 billion (when all the bits and pieces are added in), it's almost as big as the Obama economic package and sure to be a lot less effective.

UGANDA/IRAQ: Why 10,000 Ugandans are eagerly serving in Iraq
by Max DelanyChristian Science Monitor
March 6th, 2009
Hired out to multibillion-dollar companies for hundreds of dollars a month, 10,000 Ugandans risk their lives seeking fortunes protecting US Army bases, airports, and oil firms in Iraq for as little as $600 per month. Many are looking to go to Afghanistan as the Obama administration increases contracts there.

GEO Group, Inc.: Despite a Crashing Economy, Private Prison Firm Turns a Handsome Profit
by Erin RosaSpecial to CorpWatch
March 1st, 2009
While the nation’s economy flounders, business is booming for The GEO Group Inc., a private prison firm paid millions by the U.S. government. Behind the financial success and expansion of the for-profit security company, there are increasing charges of negligence, civil rights violations, abuse and even death.

US: 70 Youths Sue Former Judges in Detention Kickback Case
by Ian UrbinaNew York Times
February 26th, 2009
More than 70 juveniles and their families filed a class-action lawsuit Thursday against two former judges who pleaded guilty this month in a scheme that involved their taking kickbacks to put young offenders in privately run detention centers. The two privately operated centers are run by PA Child Care and Western PA Child Care.

MEXICO: U.S. Is Arms Bazaar for Mexican Cartels
by James C. McKinley, Jr.New York Times
February 25th, 2009
Phoenix-based gun dealer George Iknadosian of X-Calibur Guns will go on trial on charges he sold hundreds of weapons, mostly AK-47 rifles, to smugglers, knowing they would go to a drug cartel in the western state of Sinaloa. The guns helped fuel the gang warfare in which more than 6,000 Mexicans died last year.

Inheriting Halliburton's Army: What Will Obama Do With KBR?
by Pratap ChatterjeeTomDispatch.com
February 22nd, 2009
President Obama will almost certainly touch down in Baghdad and Kabul in Air Force One sometime in the coming year to meet his counterparts in Iraq and Afghanistan, and he will just as certainly pay a visit to a U.S. military base or two. Should he stay to eat with the troops, he will no less certainly choose from a menu prepared by migrant Asian workers under contract to Houston-based KBR, the former subsidiary of Halliburton.

US: Company Gets Pentagon Contract Despite Death Inquiries
by Associated PressNew York Times
February 7th, 2009
Private military contractor KBR has been awarded a $35 million Pentagon contract involving major electrical work even though it is under criminal investigation in the electrocution deaths of at least two American soldiers in Iraq.

Book Release: "Halliburton's Army: How A Well-Connected Texas Oil Company Revolutionized The Way America Makes War"
by Pratap ChatterjeeNation Books
February 3rd, 2009
In "HALLIBURTON’S ARMY: How a Well-Connected Texas Oil Company Revolutionized the Way America Makes War" (Nation Books; February 9, 2009; $26.95), muckraking journalist Pratap Chatterjee conducts a highly detailed investigation into Halliburton and its former subsidiary KBR’s activities in Kuwait and Iraq, uncovering much new information about its questionable practices and extraordinary profits.

US: The Looming Crisis at the Pentagon
by Chalmers JohnsonTomDispatch.com
February 2nd, 2009
Like much of the rest of the world, Americans know that the U.S. automotive industry is in the grips of what may be a fatal decline. A similar crisis exists when it comes to the military-industrial complex. That crisis has its roots in the corrupt and deceitful practices that have long characterized the high command of the Armed Forces, civilian executives of the armaments industries, and Congressional opportunists and pay-to-play criminals.

US/AFGHANISTAN: Short-staffed USAID tries to keep pace
by Ken DilanianUSA Today
February 1st, 2009
Like other government functions, U.S. foreign aid and reconstruction largely has been privatized. USAID now turns to contractors to fulfill its basic mission of fighting poverty and promoting democracy. CorpWatch's 2006 "Afghanistan, Inc" documented problems with Chemonics and other contractors operating in Afghanistan.

US: Deputy SecDef could earn $500K lobbying Pentagon
by Lara JakesWashington Post
January 27th, 2009
William J. Lynn, the man nominated to be the Pentagon's second-in-command could make a half-million dollars next month with vested stock he earned as a lobbyist for military contractor Raytheon. This is despite an Obama administration order against "revolving door" lobbyists who become public officials.

Hemispheric Conference against Militarization Says No to Merida Initiative, U.S. Military Bases
by Laura CarlsenAmericas Policy Program, Center for International Policy
December 30th, 2008

Popular Uprising Against Barrick Gold in Tanzania sparked by killing of local
by Sakura SaundersProtestBarrick.net
December 14th, 2008
Why would "criminals" set fire to millions worth in mine equipment? How was it that these "intruders" had an estimated 3,000 people backing them up? In what appears to be a spontaneous civilian movement against Barrick Gold, the world's largest gold miner, thousands of people invaded Barrick`s North Mara Gold Mine this week in Tarime District and destroyed equipment worth $15 million.

TANZANIA: Intruders attempt to seize North Mara mine
Guardian (Tanzania)
December 13th, 2008
A person was shot dead when thousands of gold seekers invaded Barrick`s North Mara Gold Mine in Tarime District and destroyed equipment worth 15 million US dollars.

TANZANIA: Villagers storm Barrick gold mine: Inflict much damage, FFU police deployed to disperse them
This Day (Tanzania)
December 13th, 2008
Thousands of villagers raided the North Mara gold mine owned by Barrick Gold Corp on Thursday night and caused damage to various mining equipments worth more than $16 million (approx. 21bn/-).

IRAQ: Official History Spotlights Iraq Rebuilding Blunders
by JAMES GLANZ and T. CHRISTIAN MILLERThe New York Times
December 13th, 2008
An unpublished 513-page federal history of the American-led reconstruction of Iraq depicts an effort crippled before the invasion by Pentagon planners who were hostile to the idea of rebuilding a foreign country, and then molded into a $100 billion failure by bureaucratic turf wars, spiraling violence and ignorance of the basic elements of Iraqi society and infrastructure.

US: Plea by Blackwater Guard Helps Indict Others
by GINGER THOMPSON and JAMES RISENNew York Times
December 9th, 2008
On Monday, the Justice Department unsealed its case against five Blackwater private security guards, built largely around testimony from a sixth guard about the 2007 shootings that left 17 unsuspecting Iraqi civilians dead at a busy Baghdad traffic circle.

Outsourcing Intelligence in Iraq: A CorpWatch Report on L-3/Titan, Updated December 2008 with Recommendations from Amnesty International
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
December 9th, 2008
When U.S. troops or embassy officials want to investigate Iraqis - such as interrogating prisoners, the principal intermediary is a Manhattan based-company named L-3. CorpWatch is pleased to release an updated version of this report, with recommendations from Amnesty International on human rights and other standards for translation and intelligence contracting.

US/IRAQ: Indiana guardsmen sue defense contractor KBR
by Farah StockmanBoston Globe
December 4th, 2008
Sixteen Indiana national guardsmen filed a lawsuit yesterday against military contractor KBR. The complaint alleges that several reservists contracted respiratory system tumors and skin rashes after guarding reconstruction work at the Qarmat Ali treatment plant, strewn with the toxin chromium dichromate.

US: One Man’s Military-Industrial-Media Complex
by DAVID BARSTOWThe New York Times
November 29th, 2008
The company, Defense Solutions, sought the services of a retired general with national stature, someone who could open doors at the highest levels of government and help it win a huge prize: the right to supply Iraq with thousands of armored vehicles.

CANADA/IRAQ: Drill, Garner, Drill
by Anthony FentonMother Jones
November 24th, 2008
In the history of the Iraq War, one name is perhaps synonymous with the collapse of the Bush administration's hopes for a post-Saddam world: Retired Lt. General Jay M. Garner, who served as the first post-war administrator. This year, he and a small group of former US military leaders, officials, and lobbyists have quietly used their Kurdistan connections to help Canadian companies access some of the region's richest oil fields.

UK: Britain's failure to tackle corruption damned amid new claims against BAE
by David LeighThe Guardian (UK)
October 18th, 2008
• Arms giant accused of fraud over Saudi deals • International monitors put UK ministers in dock

US: The Shadow Factory: The Ultra-Secret NSA from 9/11 to the Eavesdropping on America
by Amy Goodman and James BamfordDemocracy Now!
October 14th, 2008
The Bush administration’s wiretapping program has come under new scrutiny. Two influential congressional committees have opened probes into allegations US intelligence spied on the phone calls of U.S. military personnel, journalists and aid workers in Iraq. James Bamford discusses the NSA’s domestic sprying, the agency’s failings pre-9/11 and the ties between NSA and the nation’s telecommunications companies.

STATEMENT FROM TAOS INDUSTRIES AND AGILITY
October 7th, 2008
A statement from Taos Industries and Agility in response to CorpWatch feature article "One Million Weapons to Iraq; Many Go Missing," published on September 22, 2008.

IRAQ: U.S. to Fund Pro-American Publicity in Iraqi Media
by Karen DeYoung and Walter PincusWashingtom Post
October 3rd, 2008
The Defense Department will pay private U.S. contractors in Iraq up to $300 million over the next three years to produce news stories, entertainment programs and public service advertisements for the Iraqi media in an effort to "engage and inspire" the local population to support U.S. objectives and the Iraqi government.

ISRAEL: U.S.-Israel jet deal sought: Pentagon backs sale of next-generation F-35s fighters to ally
by Stephen ManningChicago Tribune
October 2nd, 2008
The Defense Department said this week that it wants to sell as many as 75 fighter jets to Israel in a $15.2 billion deal for the aircraft expected to be the mainstay of air power in the United States and several other nations for decades.

US: Foggo pleads guilty in Wilkes case: Former CIA official fraudulently sent contracts to friend
by Paul M. KrawzakSan Diego Union Tribune – Washington Bureau
September 30th, 2008
Kyle “Dusty” Foggo, the former No. 3 official in the CIA, pleaded guilty yesterday to fraudulently steering intelligence contracts to his lifelong friend, former Poway defense contractor Brent Wilkes.

SOUTH AFRICA: Apartheid lawsuit back in US court
SABC News
September 25th, 2008
After six years of battling, the plaintiffs must prove whether certain multinationals enabled the apartheid government to commit acts of gross human rights violations. Among the 21 defendants are oil, vehicle and financial companies which continue to operate in South Africa -- the likes of BP, Shell, Chevron Texaco, Barclays, Daimler Chrysler and Rio Tinto. They stand accused of supporting the former regime with arms and ammunition, financing, fuel, transportation and military technology.

One Million Weapons to Iraq; Many Go Missing
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
September 22nd, 2008
An Alabama company controlled by a billionaire Kuwaiti family is the biggest supplier of guns to Iraq. These weapons were paid for by the Pentagon which has lost track of them. A new Amnesty international report says that such unrestrained global arms trading schemes may have catastrophic human rights consequences.

ISRAEL: U.S. approves $330 million in arms deals for Israel
by Andrea Shalal-EsaReuters
September 9th, 2008
The U.S. government on Tuesday said it had approved up to $330 million in three separate arms deals for Israel, and sources tracking a much bigger deal for 25 Lockheed Martin Corp F-35 fighter jets said that agreement could be approved later this month.

GEORGIA: US military trained Georgian commandos
by Charles Clover in Moscow and Demetri Sevastopulo in WashingtonFinancial Times
September 5th, 2008
The US military provided combat training to 80 Georgian special forces commandos only months prior to Georgia’s army assault in South Ossetia in August.

Iraq: Introducing DisneyIraq: The Unhappiest Place on Earth
by Scott ThillAlterNet
August 15th, 2008
An American financier is pitching a vast theme park in Baghdad, not out of kindness, but as he says, "for profit."

KATRINA: U.S. Raids New Orleans Agency in Scandal Over a Housing Cleanup Program
by ADAM NOSSITERThe New York Times
August 11th, 2008
Federal investigators on Monday raided the downtown offices of a city-chartered nonprofit agency accused of abusing a federally financed program that was created to clean up houses damaged by Hurricane Katrina.

UK: Qinetiq buys US spy services firm
BBC News
August 4th, 2008
Qinetiq, once owned by the Ministry of Defence (MOD), said it would it pay $104.5m (£53m) in cash for the firm.

UK-Zimbabwe: BAE linked to Zimbabwean arms dealer
by Christopher Thompson and Michael Peel Financial Times/UK
July 31st, 2008
According to documents seen by the Financial Times, BAE Systems has been linked to Zimbabwean arms trader John Bredenkamp. BAE reportedly paid at least £20m to Bredenkamp via offshore entities in the British Virgin Islands between 2003 and 2005. The payments raise fresh questions about bribery in BAE's dealings.

UK: Law lords: fraud office right to end bribery investigation in BAE case
by David LeighThe Guardian
July 31st, 2008
England's House of Lords ruled that the Serious Fraud Office was lawful in its actions to halt investigations into allegations that BAE Systems ran a £60m "slush fund" and offered sweeteners to officials from Saudi Arabia in return for lucrative contracts.

US: Pentagon Auditors Pressured To Favor Contractors, GAO Says
by Dana HedgpethThe Washington Post
July 24th, 2008
Auditors at a Pentagon oversight agency were pressured by supervisors to skew their reports on major defense contractors to make them look more favorable instead of exposing wrongdoing and charges of overbilling, according to an 80-page report released yesterday by the Government Accountability Office.

IRAQ: Electrical Risks at Bases in Iraq Worse Than Previously Said
by JAMES RISENThe New York Times
July 18th, 2008
Shoddy electrical work by private contractors on United States military bases in Iraq is widespread and dangerous, causing more deaths and injuries from fires and shocks than the Pentagon has acknowledged, according to internal Army documents.

IRAQ: Iraq Case Sheds Light On Secret Contractors
by Siobhan Gorman and August ColeWall Street Journal
July 17th, 2008
Court documents and interviews with whistleblowers shed light on persistent problems in the operations of private military and security company MVM, Inc., a top provider of secret security to U.S. intelligence agencies in Iraq and Afghanistan.

US: General Misled Lawmakers on KBR Work, Senator Says
by JAMES RISENThe New York Times
July 10th, 2008
The senator, Byron L. Dorgan, Democrat of North Dakota, said at a hearing that Maj. Gen. Jerome Johnson, who was commander of the Army Sustainment Command until last year, made inaccurate statements to the Senate Armed Services Committee about problems with water supplied to American soldiers in Iraq by KBR, the largest defense contractor in Iraq.

Iraq: U.S. Advised Iraqi Ministry on Oil Deals
by Andrew E. KramerNew York Times
June 30th, 2008
The Bush administration has disclosed that U.S. advisors in Iraq played a key role in drawing up contracts between the Iraqi government and five major Western oil companies. The no-bid contracts are expected to be awarded Monday to Exxon Mobil, Shell, BP, Total and Chevron, as well as to several smaller oil companies.

US: Arms Dealer Had Troubled History
by ERIC SCHMITTThe New York Times
June 25th, 2008
When the Army last year awarded a contract worth up to nearly $300 million to a tiny Miami Beach munitions dealer to supply ammunition to Afghanistan’s army and police forces, it was in spite of a very checkered past.

US: Cover-Up Is Cited on Illegal Arms
by ERIC SCHMITTThe New York Times
June 24th, 2008
A military attaché has told Congressional investigators that the American ambassador to Albania endorsed a plan by that country’s defense minister to remove evidence of illegal Chinese origins on ammunition being shipped from Albania to Afghanistan by a Miami Beach arms-dealing company.

US: KBR stake under attack
by Jon OrtizSacramento Bee
June 20th, 2008
Sacramento for Democracy and other groups presented CalPERS with what they said were the names of 20,000 petitioners asking the fund to shed its KBR holdings. CalPERS owns about $27 million in KBR stock.

IRAQ: Iraq deal with US to end immunity for foreign contractors
by Patrick CockburnThe Independent UK
June 18th, 2008
The US has accepted that foreign contractors in Iraq will no longer have immunity from Iraqi law under a new security agreement now under negotiation, says the Iraqi Foreign Minister, Hoshyar Zebari.

US: Army Overseer Tells of Ouster Over KBR Stir
by James RisenNew York Times
June 17th, 2008
Charles M. Smith, the senior civilian overseeing the multibillion-dollar contract with KBR during the first two years of the war, says he was ousted for refusing to approve payment for more than $1 billion in questionable charges to KBR. The Pentagon has recently awarded KBR part of a 10-year, $150 billion contract in Iraq.

Over the Counter Intelligence
by Philip Mattera
June 13th, 2008

IRAQ: BBC uncovers lost Iraq billions
by Jane Corbin BBC News
June 10th, 2008
A BBC investigation estimates that around $23bn (£11.75bn) may have been lost, stolen or just not properly accounted for in Iraq.

US: Lockheed Faulted for Failure to Control Costs
by Dana HedgpethWashington Post
June 4th, 2008
Lockheed Martin, the biggest U.S. defense contractor, failed to follow military guidelines to track and manage costs on major weapons programs, according to an internal Pentagon document released yesterday by a government watchdog group.

Military contractor’s 747 crashes just before Memorial day
by Pratap Chatterjee
May 25th, 2008
A Kalitta Air plane en route to Bahrain in the Middle East has crashed. The Michigan based company has been linked to the CIA rendition program. It is also the main contractor that flies home bodies of U.S. soldiers after they are killed in combat in Iraq and Afghanistan.

IRAQ: Controversial Contractor’s Iraq Work Is Split Up
by JAMES RISENThe New York Times
May 24th, 2008
For the first time since the war began, the largest single Pentagon contract in Iraq is being divided among three companies, ending the monopoly held by KBR, the Houston-based corporation that has been accused of wasteful spending and mismanagement and of exploiting its political ties to Vice President Dick Cheney.

US: Halliburton CEO says Dubai base the 'right decision'
by Brett ClantonHouston Chronicle
May 21st, 2008
Shareholder John Harrington questioned Halliburton CEO David Lesar during the 2008 annual meeting of the company's shareholders Wednesday at the Houstonian Hotel, Club and Spa, over his motives to move to Dubai, suggesting it was designed to dodge paying U.S. taxes or escape blame for past wrongs.

US: Contractors, insurance firms gouging taxpayers, panel says
by RICHARD LARDNERAssociated Press
May 15th, 2008
A poorly run Pentagon program for providing workman's compensation for civilian employees in Iraq and Afghanistan has allowed defense contractors and insurance companies to gouge American taxpayers, a House committee said Thursday.

KBR Questioned on Labor Abuses in Iraq
by Pratap Chatterjee
May 7th, 2008
Kellogg, Brown and Root (KBR), the former subsidiary of Halliburton, announced today that it was buying Alabama-based BE&K for $500 million.

IRAQ: Despite Alert, Flawed Wiring Still Kills G.I.’s
by JAMES RISENThe New York Times
May 4th, 2008
One electrician warned his KBR bosses in his 2005 letter of resignation that unsafe electrical work was “a disaster waiting to happen.”

An Afternoon with L-3 Communications/Titan
by Tonya Hennessey
April 30th, 2008

Outsourcing Intelligence in Iraq: A CorpWatch Report on L-3/Titan
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
April 29th, 2008
When U.S. troops or embassy officials want to investigate Iraqis - such as interrogating prisoners, the principal intermediary is a Manhattan based-company named L-3. The company has just lost its biggest contract for failing to recruit qualified translators, and is also being investigated for human rights abuses.

CONCLUSION
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
April 29th, 2008
When U.S. troops or embassy officials want to investigate Iraqis - such as interrogating prisoners, the principal intermediary is a Manhattan based-company named L-3. The company has just lost its biggest contract for failing to recruit qualified translators, and is also being investigated for human rights abuses.

Part Two: The Translators
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
April 29th, 2008
When U.S. troops or embassy officials want to investigate Iraqis - such as interrogating prisoners, the principal intermediary is a Manhattan based-company named L-3. The company has just lost its biggest contract for failing to recruit qualified translators, and is also being investigated for human rights abuses.

Part One: The Interrogators
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
April 29th, 2008
When U.S. troops or embassy officials want to investigate Iraqis - such as interrogating prisoners, the principal intermediary is a Manhattan based-company named L-3. The company has just lost its biggest contract for failing to recruit qualified translators, and is also being investigated for human rights abuses.

US: Rape in Iraq Recounted
by SUZANNE GAMBOAThe Associated Press
April 10th, 2008
An Illinois woman who says she was raped while working for a contractor in Iraq recounted the experience in a congressional hearing Wednesday.

US: Washington Blocks Exports of Munitions Firm Suspected of Fraud
by C. J. CHIVERSNew York Times
April 4th, 2008
The U.S. State Department on Thursday suspended the international export activities of AEY Inc., a Miami Beach arms-dealing company led by a 22-year-old man whose munitions procurements for the Pentagon are under criminal investigation.

AFGHANISTAN: Supplier Under Scrutiny on Aging Arms for Afghans
by C. J. CHIVERSThe New York Times
March 27th, 2008
With the award last January of a federal contract worth as much as nearly $300 million, the company, AEY Inc., which operates out of an unmarked office in Miami Beach, became the main supplier of munitions to Afghanistan’s army and police forces. Since then, the company has provided ammunition that is more than 40 years old and in decomposing packaging, according to an examination of the munitions by The New York Times and interviews with American and Afghan officials.

IRAQ: Authorities Identify Remains Of Two American Contractors
by Steve FainaruWashington Post Foreign Service
March 25th, 2008
U.S. authorities have recovered the remains of two American contractors, the latest grim development in one of the longest-running hostage dramas of the Iraq war.

AFGHANISTAN: Missing: The £5bn aid needed to rebuild lives
by JEROME STARKEY AND ROSS LYDALL The Scotsman
March 25th, 2008
Vast sums of aid are lost in corporate profits of contractors and sub-contractors, which can be as high as 50 per cent on a single contract. A vast amount of aid is absorbed by high salaries, with generous allowances, and other costs of expatriates working for consulting firms and contractors.

Ecuador's Yasuni Park: Oil Exploration or Nature Protection?
by Agneta EnströmSpecial to CorpWatch
March 20th, 2008
Permission for Petrobras of Brazil to drill for oil in Yasuni National Park, one of the most biologically diverse places in the world, has been suspended, but some damage has already been done by Swedish construction giant Skanska. Unless new money is found to protect the forest, exploration may resume.

IRAQ: Forbidden fields: Oil groups circle the prize of Iraq's vast reserves
by Roula Khalaf and Steve NegusThe Financial Times
March 19th, 2008
Shell is one of several international oil companies - including BP and the US groups ExxonMobil and Chevron - that have been tapping into Iraq's oil industry by remote control.

IRAQ: KBR Faulted on Water Provided to Soldiers
by Dana HedgpethThe Washington Post
March 11th, 2008
U.S. soldiers at a military base in Iraq were provided with treated but untested wastewater for nearly two years by KBR, the giant government contractor, and may have suffered health problems as a result, according to a report released yesterday by the Pentagon's inspector general.

Carlyle Group May Buy Major CIA Contractor: Booz Allen Hamilton
by Tim Shorrock Special to CorpWatch
March 8th, 2008
The Carlyle Group, one of the world's largest private equity funds, may soon buy out the $2 billion dollar intelligence division of Booz Allen Hamilton, one of the biggest advisors to the U.S. spy community.

CAYMAN ISLANDS: Top Iraq contractor skirts US taxes offshore
by Farah StockmanThe Boston Globe
March 6th, 2008
Kellogg Brown & Root, the nation's top Iraq war contractor and until last year a subsidiary of Halliburton Corp., has avoided paying hundreds of millions of dollars in federal Medicare and Social Security taxes by hiring workers through shell companies based in this tropical tax haven.

INDIA: Gates in India to push US firms
BBC News Online
February 26th, 2008
Mr Gates is expected to spend his two-day visit lobbying for US firms that hope to win a contract to supply India with 126 new fighter jets.

US: Inside the world of war profiteers
by David Jackson and Jason Grotto|Tribune reportersChicago Tribune
February 21st, 2008
Hundreds of pages of recently unsealed court records detail how kickbacks shaped the war's largest troop support contract months before the first wave of U.S. soldiers plunged their boots into Iraqi sand.

US: 12 Years for Contractor in Bribery Case
by ELLIOT SPAGATAP
February 20th, 2008
A defense contractor was sentenced to 12 years in federal prison Tuesday for bribing former Rep. Randy "Duke" Cunningham with cash, trips, the services of prostitutes and other gifts in exchange for nearly $90 million in Pentagon work.

GERMANY: German Arms Firm Ends Blackwater Deal After TV Report
by DW staff (ncy)Deutsche Welle
February 19th, 2008
Weapons manufacturer Heckler & Koch said it would end its relationship with Blackwater after German media reported that the controversial US-run military firm was using its guns in Iraq and Afghanistan.

US: Holes in the Wall
by Melissa del BosqueThe Texas Observer
February 18th, 2008
As the U.S. Department of Homeland Security marches down the Texas border serving condemnation lawsuits to frightened landowners, Brownsville resident Eloisa Tamez, 72, has one simple question. She would like to know why her land is being targeted for destruction by a border wall, while a nearby golf course and resort remain untouched.

UK: BAE: secret papers reveal threats from Saudi prince
by David Leigh and Rob EvansThe Guardian (UK)
February 15th, 2008
Prince Bandar, the head of the Saudi national security council, and son of the crown prince, was alleged in court to be the man behind the threats to hold back information about suicide bombers and terrorists. He faces accusations that he himself took more than £1bn in secret payments from the arms company BAE.

US: Court dismisses lawsuit on secret kidnapping
by Adam TannerReuters
February 14th, 2008
A federal judge, saying the case involved a state secret, dismissed a lawsuit on Wednesday against a unit of Boeing Co that charged the firm helped fly terrorism suspects abroad to secret prisons.

US: Limbo for U.S. Women Reporting Iraq Assaults
by JAMES RISENThe New York Times
February 13th, 2008
Ms. Kineston is among a number of American women who have reported that they were sexually assaulted by co-workers while working as contractors in Iraq but now find themselves in legal limbo, unable to seek justice or even significant compensation.

AFGHANISTAN: Security companies fall foul of gun controls
by Jeremy PageTimes Online U.K.
February 11th, 2008
Afghan police have begun a crackdown on private security guards carrying guns in Kabul, paralysing foreign aid and other organisations whose rules oblige them to travel with armed escorts.

US: Contractor Abuses Rarely Punished, Groups Say
by Ali GharibIPS
January 21st, 2008
Out of the dozens upon dozens of reports of abuses by private contractors as part of the U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, only one prosecution of a contractor has taken place.

US: A Mission to Rebuild Reputations
by Dana HedgpethWashington Post
January 17th, 2008
Now those promises -- and the public's perception of the Air Force's ability to spend its money prudently -- are being tested by new contracting and public relations challenges. The Air Force is about to award two key contracts worth a total of about $55 billion, and Boeing is in the running for both deals.

QinetiQ Goes Kinetic: Top Rumsfeld Aide Wins Contracts From Spy Office He Set Up
by Tim Shorrock Special to CorpWatch
January 15th, 2008
A Pentagon office that was reprimanded by the U.S. Congress for spying on antiwar activists, has just awarded a multi-million dollar contract to QinetiQ, a British company that employs Stephen Cambone. Cambone, a former aide to Donald Rumsfeld, helped create the very office that issued the contract.

UK: FBI wants instant access to British identity data
by Owen BowcottThe Guardian (UK)
January 15th, 2008
Americans seek international database to carry iris, palm and finger prints

IRAQ: 2005 Use of Gas by Blackwater Leaves Questions
by JAMES RISENNew York Times
January 10th, 2008
In 2005 Blackwater accidentally dropped teargas on US soldiers, which has raised significant new questions about the role of private security contractors in Iraq, and whether they operate under the same rules of engagement and international treaty obligations that the American military observes.

JAPAN: Yamada gave additional 400,000 dollars to organization
Yomiuri Shimbun
January 8th, 2008
Defense contractor Yamada Corp. provided a total of 400,000 dollars in consultant fees to an executive director of a Japan-U.S. exchange organization between 2003 and 2005.

IRAQ: Shame of Imported Labor in Kurdish North of Iraq
by Michael KamberNew York Times
December 29th, 2007
Thousands of foreign workers have come to the Kurdish districts in northern Iraq in the last three years. Many have been deceived by unscrupulous agents who arrange the journeys, like the Bangladesh-based Travel Mix agency.

IRAQ: Sexual Violence: An Occupational Hazard -- In Iraq and at Home
by Marie TessierWomen's Media Center
December 26th, 2007
Jamie Leigh Jones was just 20 in 2005 when she took a leap of faith to work in Iraq for her employer, military contractor Kellogg, Brown & Root, then a subsidiary of Halliburton. She went on a mission she believed in. Shortly after her arrival in Iraq, however, Jones' ambitions were dashed in an alleged gang rape by co-workers.

IRAQ: Bosses didn't want to expose Iraqi police corruption
by Henry McDonald, Duncan Campbell and Richard Norton-TaylorThe Guardian
December 24th, 2007
"It appears that ArmorGroup, by taking on extra staff ... and quickly making some redundant, is essentially transferring the risk inherent in such contract work to employees while making fat profits for itself," his MP, Dr Phyllis Starkey, told the House of Commons earlier this year.

The Gunmen of Kabul
by Fariba NawaSpecial to CorpWatch
December 21st, 2007
The booming private security industry in Afghanistan has been the target of a number government raids in the last few months. One of the largest contractors -- United States Protection and Investigations (USPI) from Texas -- has been accused of corruption.

KUWAIT: How Iraq Conflict Rewards A Kuwaiti Merchant Family
by CAM SIMPSON and GLENN R. SIMPSONWall Street Journal
December 17th, 2007
Federal prosecutors in Atlanta are looking into whether Public Warehousing and another family-dominated company, Sultan Center Food Products Co., colluded to gouge the U.S. military.

US: Wider Spying Fuels Aid Plan for Telecom Industry
by Eric Lichtblau, James Risen and Scott ShaneNew York Times
December 16th, 2007
The Bush administration is waging a high-profile campaign to persuade Congress to pass legislation protecting companies from lawsuits for aiding the National Security Agency's warrantless eavesdropping program. At stake is the federal government's partnership with industry to conduct a wide range of secret surveillance operations in fighting terrorism and crime.

US: U.S. paid $32M for Iraqi base that wasn't built
by Matt KelleyUSA Today
December 14th, 2007
The U.S. military paid a Florida company nearly $32 million to build barracks and offices for Iraqi army units even though nothing was ever built, Pentagon investigators reported.

US: House Panel Looking Into Charges by Former KBR Employee
by Justin RoodABC News
December 13th, 2007
A House panel is looking into charges of sexual assault made by a former Halliburton/KBR employee in Iraq.

US: DOJ Questioned About '05 Iraq Rape Case
by John PorrettoAP News
December 12th, 2007
The chairman of the House Judiciary Committee asked the Justice Department on Tuesday to give a full account of its investigation into the alleged rape of a female contract worker in Iraq two years ago.

Climate Change Debate Fuels Greenwash Boom
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
December 11th, 2007
On the Indonesian island of Bali, thousands of senior government officials are negotiating a plan to slow global warming. The coal, gas and oil companies that are major producers of greenhouse gases are finally taking notice of these high-level political discussions, and many have mounted spirited public relations exercises to defend themselves.

US: Disputed in Iraq, Blackwater Now Splits California Town
by Salomon MooreNew York Times
December 11th, 2007
A small community in southern California is upset at the prospect of a Blackwater training camp moving into town.

US: Victim: Gang-Rape Cover-Up by U.S., Halliburton/KBR
by Brian Ross, Maddy Sauer & Justin RoodABC News
December 10th, 2007
A Houston, Texas woman says she was gang-raped by Halliburton/KBR coworkers in Baghdad, and the company and the U.S. government are covering up the incident.

US: The Army's $200 Billion Makeover
by Alec KleinWashington Post
December 7th, 2007
A $200 billion plan to remake the largest war machine in history unfolds in one small way on a quiet country road in the Chihuahuan Desert.

US: Life Was Lost in Maelstrom of Suspicion
by Ginger Thompson and Eric SchmittNew York Times
December 4th, 2007
The suicide of a top Air Force procurement officer casts a cloud of suspicion, threatening to plunge a service still struggling to emerge from one of its worst scandals into another quagmire.

AFGHANISTAN: NATO Airstrike Kills 14 Afghans
by Abdul Waheed WafaNew York Times
November 29th, 2007
A NATO airstrike killed 14 laborers working for an Afghan road construction company that had been contracted by the United States Army Corps of Engineers.

Domestic Spying, Inc.
by Tim Shorrock Special to CorpWatch
November 27th, 2007
A new U.S. intelligence institution will allow government spy agencies to conduct broad surveillance and reconnaissance inside the country for the first time. Contractors like Boeing, BAE Systems, Harris Corporation, L-3 Communications and Science Applications International Corporation are already lining up for possible work.

US: Blackwater Probe Stifled by Conflicts
by Richard LardnerAssociated Press
November 26th, 2007
A Blackwater weapons probe continues to be bogged down after months of strained relations between Bush administration officials.

US: Border Fence Work Raises Environmental Concerns
by Randal C. ArchiboldNew York Times
November 21st, 2007
Environmental groups, elected officials and local Indian tribes criticize the Department of Homeland Security over environmental concerns related to fencing along the U.S.-Mexico border.

GERMANY: Get Rich or Die Trying
by John Goetz and Conny NeumannDer Spiegel
November 12th, 2007
Germany companies send mercenaries to Iraq.

US: Army may ban security firm from contracts; Executive accused of using information gained during affair
by Matt KelleyUSA Today
November 12th, 2007
The Army has threatened to ban a private security firm in Iraq from government work because an executive allegedly got inside information to win $2.5 million in contracts, Army records show.

US: Failure to Launch: In Death of Spy Satellite Program, Lofty Plans and Unrealistic Bids
by Philip TaubmanNew York Times
November 11th, 2007
Collapse of a government funded project to build new spy satellites was all but inevitable.

UK: Weapons firm's role in St Athan academy condemned
by Martin ShiptonWestern Mail
November 9th, 2007
Campaigners have condemned the Assembly Government for backing a huge military training project, despite the involvement of a weapons company previously linked to cluster bombs.

US: Louisiana Charges Price Fixing by Insurers
New York Times
November 7th, 2007
The Louisiana attorney general sues the state’s largest property insurance companies for engaging in an elaborate price-fixing scheme.

PERU-IRAQ: A Year in Hell for 1,000 Dollars a Month
by Ángel PáezIPS News
November 7th, 2007
Poor well-trained ex guerrillas from Peru are easily recruited for security contract work in Iraq.

US: Defense contractor guilty in US lawmaker corruption scandal
AFP
November 7th, 2007
A former defense contractor was convicted by a San Diego court on Monday of bribing a jailed US lawmaker with 700,000 dollars in cash, gifts and prostitutes.

US: Fort Huachuca intelligence center draws private contractors
by Mike SunnucksPhoenix Business Journal
November 7th, 2007
An increasing amount of U.S. intelligence work -- including training related to aggressive interrogation methods -- is being parceled out to defense firms making Arizona's Fort Huachuca a major contracting hub.

US: Whistleblowers claim contractor fraud ignored
by Guillermo ContrerasExpress News
November 5th, 2007
Whistleblower allegations against corporate wrongdoings in the War in Iraq are often swept under the rug by the U.S. Government.

US: Toxins Threaten to Uproot Entire Town
by Mark WeisenmillerIPS News
November 5th, 2007
The mostly African American citizens of a small town in rural Florida suffer severely because of a beryllium leak at a Lockheed Martin-owned plant.

US: Blackwater Mounts a Defense With Top Talent
by John M. Broder and James RisenNY Times
November 5th, 2007
lackwater Worldwide, its reputation in tatters and its lucrative government contracts in jeopardy, is mounting an aggressive legal, political and public relations counterstrike.

US: Blackwater's Owner Has Spies for Hire
by Dana HedgpethWashington Post
November 3rd, 2007
The Prince Group, the holding company that owns Blackwater Worldwide, has been building an operation that will sniff out intelligence about natural disasters, business-friendly governments, overseas regulations and global political developments for clients in industry and government.

IRELAND: Irish subsidiary implicated in Saddam fraud
by Arthur BeesleyThe Irish Times
November 1st, 2007
The Irish subsidiary of US industrial group Ingersoll-Rand paid a $53,919 (EUR 37,235) "kickback" to Saddam Hussein's regime in Iraq in an effort to secure a UN contract, US regulators have claimed.

US: Protest Leads Army to Reconsider Big Contract
by Dana HedgpethWashington Post
November 1st, 2007
One of the biggest military contracts to house, feed and provide other services to U.S. military troops in Iraq, Afghanistan and Kuwait may be canceled and renegotiated after the Government Accountability Office said yesterday that it upheld a protest from two teams that lost the bid.

US: US soldier's family brings legal action against British private security firm
by Susan GoldenbergThe Guardian
October 30th, 2007
A British private security firm hired to protect the oil installations of post-invasion Iraq is being sued for causing the death of an American soldier.

US: Democrats Criticize Immunity Offers to Guards
by David JohnstonNY Times
October 30th, 2007
Prominent Democrats in Congress reacted angrily today to disclosures that State Department investigators made apparently unauthorized offers of immunity to Blackwater security guards.

US: Rice Says ‘Hole’ in U.S. Law Shields Contractors in Iraq
by John M. BroderNY Times
October 26th, 2007
Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice conceded on Thursday that there was a “hole” in United States law that had allowed Blackwater USA employees and other armed contractors in Iraq to escape legal jeopardy for crimes possibly committed there.

UK: Peer was paid to introduce lobbyist to minister
by David Leigh and Rob EvansThe Guardian
October 26th, 2007
A Labour peer has admitted taking money to introduce an arms company lobbyist to the government minister in charge of weapons purchases.

US: Clinton Bucks The Trend and Rakes in Cash From The US Weapons Industry
by Leonard DoyleThe Independent (UK)
October 19th, 2007
The US arms industry is backing Hillary Clinton for President and has all but abandoned its traditional allies in the Republican party.

US: Houston Businessman Is Key Figure In U.S. Probe of Iraq Food Contracts
by Glenn R. SimpsonWall Street Journal
October 18th, 2007
As federal authorities probe the web of food suppliers for U.S. troops in Iraq, one focus of scrutiny is a Lebanese-American businessman indicted for allegedly inflating food prices with fraudulent bills.

US: Homeland Security's Use of Contractors Is Questioned
by Spencer S. HsuWashington Post
October 17th, 2007
DHS attempts to address concerns over contractor accountability.

US: Food Companies Face U.S. Probe Over Iraq Deals
by Glen R. SimpsonWall Street Journal
October 16th, 2007
Prominent American food companies are under scrutiny in a federal probe of possible fraud and corruption in the military's food-supply operations for the Iraq war.

NAMIBIA: All Hiring for Iraq Halted
by Brigitte WeidlichThe Namibian
October 16th, 2007
A Namibian labour hire company, which processed the applications of Namibian ex-combatants who wanted to become 'security' guards in Iraq and Afghanistan, has stopped the process.

US: Pentagon probes contractor fraud on Kuwait base
by Matt KelleyUSA Today
October 15th, 2007
Dozens of investigations turn up ties to U.S. Army's Camp Arifjan.

US: Blackwater vies for jobs beyond security
by August ColeWall Street Journal
October 15th, 2007
Even as Blackwater USA works to recover from criticism of its private-security forces in Iraq, the company plans for an expansion into other areas.

IRAQ:2 Women Killed in Security Shooting Are Buried in Iraq
by Andrew E. Kramer and James GlanzNY Times
October 11th, 2007
Two women killed Tuesday by a barrage of gunfire from private security guards in central Baghdad are buried there.

US: The People vs. the Profiteers
by David RoseVanity Fair
October 4th, 2007
Americans working in Iraq for Halliburton spin-off KBR have been outraged by the massive fraud they saw there. Dozens are suing the giant military contractor, on the taxpayers' behalf. Whose side is the Justice Department on?

IRAQ: From Errand to Fatal Shot to Hail of Fire to 17 Deaths
by James Glanz and Alissa J. RubinNY Times
October 3rd, 2007
Witness accounts give new details in the Blackwater shooting in Nisour Square.

Outsourcing Fear
by Robert Young Pelton
October 2nd, 2007
Robert Young Pelton is the author of "Licensed to Kill: Hired Guns in the War on Terror " and the "Guide to the World's Most Dangerous Places." He is also co-founder of http://www.iraqslogger.com/ . This blog item is about his experiences attending the Congressional hearing into the Blackwater shootings in Iraq written on October 2nd, 2007.

US: Chief of Blackwater Defends His Employees
by John M. BroderNew York Times
October 2nd, 2007
Erik D. Prince, chief executive of Blackwater USA, told a Congressional committee on Tuesday that his company’s nearly 1,000 armed guards in Iraq were not trigger-happy mercenaries, but rather loyal Americans doing a necessary job in hostile territory.

US: U.S. Pays Steep Price for Private Security in Iraq
by Walter PincusWashington Post
October 1st, 2007
It costs the U.S. government a lot more to hire contract employees as security guards in Iraq than to use American troops.

US: Billions over Baghdad; The Spoils of War
by Donald L. Barlett and James B. SteeleVanity Fair
October 1st, 2007
Between April 2003 and June 2004, $12 billion in U.S. currency--much of it belonging to the Iraqi people--was shipped from the Federal Reserve to Baghdad, where it was dispensed by the Coalition Provisional Authority. Incredibly, at least $9 billion has gone missing, unaccounted for, in a frenzy of mismanagement and greed.

US: State Dept. Tallies 56 Shootings Involving Blackwater on Diplomatic Guard Duty
by James RisenNY Times
September 28th, 2007
The State Department said Thursday that Blackwater USA security personnel had been involved in 56 shootings while guarding American diplomats in Iraq so far this year.

RUSSIA: Energomash Says It Was Asked for $10M Bribe
by Anatoly MedetskyMoscow Times
September 28th, 2007
Engineering company NPO Energomash reports that it was approached for a large bribe to reinstate its export license.

IRAQ: Iraqis describe violence by private U.S. security guards
by Leila FadelSeattle Times
September 28th, 2007
Acts of violence committed by Blackwater security guards, charged with protecting U.S. diplomats are described by Iraqi victims.

Contractor Rock Bands Jam with Military
by Pratap Chatterjee
September 27th, 2007

US: State Dept. intercedes in Blackwater probe
by Peter SpiegelLA Times
September 26th, 2007
The State Department has interceded in a congressional investigation of Blackwater USA, the private security firm accused of killing Iraqi civilians last week.

US: Graft in Military Contracts Spread From Base
by Ginger Thompson and Eric SchmitNew York Times
September 24th, 2007
A US major is arrested in relation to a bribery scheme involving companies seeking military contracts.

IRAQ: Blackwater Shooting Crisis Rallies Baghdad
by Philip ShishkinWall Street Journal
September 24th, 2007
An escalating controversy over the alleged shooting of Iraqi civilians by a U.S. security firm has triggered the strongest challenge yet to legal immunity for some foreigners in Iraq, while providing a rare rallying cry for the country's polarized factions.

US: Lockheed Looks Beyond Weapon: Contractor Targets Growth With Services in Strife-Torn Areas
by August ColeWall Street Journal
September 24th, 2007
Lockheed looks to secure more U.S. government contracts for other services from managing military bases and embassies to helping writing constitutions for developing nations.

US: U.S. probes Blackwater weapons shipments
by Joseph NeffNews & Observer (North Carolina)
September 22nd, 2007
The U.S. government is investigating whether private military contractor Blackwater USA, blamed for the deaths of 11 Iraqis in Baghdad on Sunday, has been shipping unlicensed automatic weapons and military goods to Iraq.

The Boys from Baghdad: Iraqi Commandos Trained by U.S. Contractor
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
September 20th, 2007
Iraqi commandos are being training by USIS, a Virginia-based company that was once owned by the Carlyle Group. One of multiple "security" forces being created with $20 billion in U.S. funds, these Emergency Response Units may be stoking civil unrest as they accompany U.S. troops on raids.

US: Evoking Vietnam clash, Wisconsin students to protest Halliburton visit
by Ryan J. Foley, APHouston Chronicle
September 19th, 2007
Students at Madison protest against Halliburton Co. recruiters, evoking memories of a 1967 protest of Dow, which made napalm for the US military.

IRAQ: Big oil’s waiting game over Iraq’s reserves
by Ed Crooks and Sheila McNultyFinancial Times
September 19th, 2007
Oil companies face a dilemma in Iraq over whether to wait for a new oil law which will give them a legal framework in which to operate or to sign agreements now with the Kurdistan Regional Government at the risk of sullying relations with Baghdad and the rest of the country.

IRAQ: Iraqi Report Says Blackwater Guards Fired First
by Sabrina Tavernise and James GlanzNew York Times
September 19th, 2007
A preliminary Iraqi report says that Blackwater security guards needlessly fired at a car, killing a couple and their infant.

US: Families Cannot Sue Firm for Israel Deaths
by Ed PilkingtonGuardian (London)
September 19th, 2007
The parents of Rachel Corrie, the US peace activist who was crushed to death four years ago in the then Israeli-occupied Gaza as she was protesting against the demolition of Palestinian homes, have been refused permission to sue the company which made the bulldozer that killed her.

Blackwater Back in the News
by Pratap Chatterjee
September 18th, 2007

US: U.S. Contractor Banned by Iraq Over Shootings
by Sabrina TaverniseNew York Times
September 18th, 2007
Blackwater USA, an American contractor that provides security to some of the top American officials in Iraq, has been banned from working in the country by the Iraqi government after a shooting that left eight Iraqis dead and involved an American diplomatic convoy.

IRAQ: Will Iraq Kick Out Blackwater?
by Adam Zagorin and Brian BennettTIME Magazine
September 17th, 2007
TIME has obtained an incident report prepared by the U.S. government describing a fire fight Sunday in Baghdad in which at least eight Iraqis were reported killed and 13 wounded. The loss of life has provoked anger in Baghdad, where the Interior Ministry has suspended Blackwater's license to operate around the country.

Fact Sheet: Casualties of Katrina
September 15th, 2007

Moving Water Industries Responds
by William E. Bucknam
September 12th, 2007
Moving Water Industries counsel sesponds to CorpWatch article on the company's role in fixing levees on the U.S. Gulf Coast.

CHINA: An Opportunity for Wall St. in China’s Surveillance Boom
by Keith BradsherNew York Times
September 11th, 2007
China Security and Surveillance Technology, a fast-growing company that installs and sometimes operates surveillance systems for Chinese police agencies, jails and banks, has just been approved for a listing on the New York Stock Exchange. The company’s listing is just a sign of ever-closer ties among Wall Street, surveillance companies and the Chinese government’s security apparatus.

US: Iraq convoy was sent out despite threat
by T. Christian MillerLA Times
September 3rd, 2007
Senior managers for defense contractor KBR overruled calls to halt supply operations in Iraq in the spring of 2004, ordering unarmored trucks into an active combat zone where six civilian drivers died in an ambush, according to newly available documents.

US: Army to examine Iraq contracts
by Richard LardnerAssociated Press
August 29th, 2007
The Army will examine as many as 18,000 contracts awarded over the past four years to support U.S. forces in Iraq to determine how many are tainted by waste, fraud and abuse.

LIST OF EXPERTS - Casualties of Katrina
August 27th, 2007

Acknowledgments
August 27th, 2007

ENDNOTES - Casualties of Katrina
August 27th, 2007

Reconsidering the Rush to Rebuild the Big Easy
by Azibuike AkabaSpecial to CorpWatch
August 27th, 2007

Small Business Contracts
by Amelia HightSpecial to CorpWatch
August 27th, 2007

Labor: Migrants Exploited, Locals Ignored
by Sam Finn Cate-Gumpert and Amelia HightSpecial to CorpWatch
August 27th, 2007

Casinos: Gambling Bonanza
by Eliza StricklandSpecial to CorpWatch
August 27th, 2007

Mulching the Cypress Swamps
by Eliza StricklandSpecial to CorpWatch
August 27th, 2007

Refineries: Cleaning Up Big With Hurricane Aid
by Eliza StricklandSpecial to CorpWatch
August 27th, 2007

Debris: Surrounded by Dumps
by Eliza StricklandSpecial to CorpWatch
August 27th, 2007

Levees: Moving Water
by Eliza StricklandSpecial to CorpWatch
August 27th, 2007

Trailer Parks and Tarps: The Shaw Group and Fluor
by Sam Finn Cate-GumpertSpecial to CorpWatch
August 27th, 2007

“Road Home” Program
by Eliza StricklandSpecial to CorpWatch
August 27th, 2007

Insurance: State Farm
by Eliza StricklandSpecial to CorpWatch
August 27th, 2007

Back on the Bayou: Electricity & Entergy
by Eliza StricklandSpecial to CorpWatch
August 27th, 2007

Casualties of Katrina: Gulf Coast Reconstruction Two Years after the Hurricane
by Eliza Strickland and Azibuike AkabaSpecial to CorpWatch
August 27th, 2007
This CorpWatch report, by Eliza Strickland and Azibuike Akaba, tells the story of corporate malfeasance and government incompetence two years after Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans. This is our second report – Big, Easy Money by Rita J. King was the first – and it digs into a slew of new scandals.

Casualties of Katrina: Gulf Coast Reconstruction Two Years after the Hurricane
Special to CorpWatch
August 27th, 2007
Table of Contents for "Casualties of Katrina: Gulf Coast Reconstruction Two Years after the Hurricane" Report

UK: British firm under scrutiny for export of Bosnian guns to Iraq
by Jamie Doward and Johnny McDevittThe Observer (UK)
August 13th, 2007
MPs and Amnesty International demand to know if a Nottingham-based company has breached the United Nations arms embargo

IRAQ: U.S. Pays Millions In Cost Overruns For Security in Iraq
by Steve FainaruThe Washington Post
August 12th, 2007
U.S. military has paid $548 million over the past three years to two British security firms that protect the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on reconstruction projects, more than $200 million over the original budget, according to previously undisclosed data that show how the cost of private security in Iraq has mushroomed.

Philippine News: R.P. probes ‘trafficked OFWs’ in Iraq
by Beting Laygo DolorPhilippine News
August 8th, 2007
President Gloria Arroyo has ordered an investigation into reports that Filipino workers were forced to go to Iraq to work on the U.S. embassy there despite a ban on them traveling there. A report from the watchdog organization CorpWatch said that “other South Asians” were indeed working for First Kuwait Trading and Contracting in Iraq.

US: Boeing unit subject of refiled CIA-flight suit
by Bloomberg NewsChicago Tribune
August 2nd, 2007
A Boeing Co. unit falsified flight plans to disguise the Central Intelligence Agency's transporting of terrorism suspects to secret prisons overseas, the American Civil Liberties Union claims in an updated lawsuit.

US: As Iraq Costs Soar, Contractors Earn Record Profits
by Eli CliftonInter Press Service News Agency
August 2nd, 2007
In a report to lawmakers earlier this week, the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office found that the war in Iraq could cost U.S. taxpayers over a trillion dollars when the long-term costs of caring for soldiers wounded in action, military and economic aid for the Iraqi government, and ongoing costs associated with the 190,000 troops stationed in Iraq are totaled up.

US: Blackwater-U. of I. tie
by E.A. Torriero and Jodi S. CohenThe Chicago Tribune
July 31st, 2007
The University of Illinois is investigating potential conflicts of interest involving the director of the school's prestigious police-training institute and Blackwater U.S.A., the military contractor.

IRAQ: For Abducted Guards, Iraq Wasn't Just About Money
by Steve FainaruWashington Post Foreign Service
July 30th, 2007
Surrounded by darkness, an AK-47 at his side, Jonathon Cote considered his future early last November from Southern Iraq. On Nov. 16, he and four colleagues from Crescent Security Group, a small private firm, were ambushed and taken hostage.

IRAQ: Cutting Costs, Bending Rules, And a Trail of Broken Lives
by Steve FainaruThe Washington Post
July 29th, 2007
An ambush in Iraq last November left four Americans missing and a string of questions about the firm they worked for.

CorpWatch stories on Iraq & New Mexico get mainstream coverage
by Pratap Chatterjee
July 27th, 2007
The U.S. Congress and the mainstream media are picking up on some of the issues that CorpWatch has been digging into over the last couple of years. Namely, trafficking of workers to Iraq; coal power plants on Diné land; and Iraq reconstruction.

IRAQ: Foreign Workers Abused at Embassy, Panel Told
by William BraniginThe Washinton Post
July 27th, 2007
Two American civilian contractors who worked on a massive U.S. Embassy construction project in Baghdad told Congress yesterday that foreign laborers were deceptively recruited and trafficked to Iraq to toil at the site, where they experienced physical abuse and substandard working conditions.

IRAQ: Bechtel Meets Goals on Fewer Than Half of Its Iraq Rebuilding Projects, U.S. Study Finds
by James GlanzThe New York Times
July 26th, 2007
One of the largest American contractors working in Iraq, Bechtel National, met its original objectives on fewer than half of the projects it received as part of a $1.8 billion reconstruction contract, while most of the rest were canceled, reduced in scope or never completed as designed, federal investigators have found in a report released yesterday.

US: Blackwater supports inquiry into fatal shooting
by Bill SizemoreVirginian-Pilot
July 25th, 2007
After one of his personal bodyguards was shot to death by a Blackwater USA security contractor last Christmas Eve, Iraqi Vice President Adil Abdul-Mahdi assured the U.S. ambassador that he was trying to keep the incident out of the public eye.

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