Halliburton Fact Sheet


 

HALLIBURTON FACT SHEET

... Halliburton has earned over $3.9 billion in government contracts in 2003 alone

... This includes combating oil fires and fix oil pipelines: $710 million; support for invading army: $820 million; housing and transportation for troops in Kuwait: $289 million; housing and transportation for troops in Jordan: $40 million; housing and transportation for teams searching for weapons of mass destruction in Iraq: $40 million

Other Halliburton Contracts

Camp Bondsteel and Camp Monteith in Kosovo: $829.2 million
... Eagle Base and Camp McGovern in Bosnia/Herzegovinia: $695.2 million
... Taszar air base in Hungary: $287.7 million
... Incirlik Airbase in Turkey: $100 million
... Bagram and Kandahar Airbase in Afghanistan: $52.2 million
... Camp Able Century in Macedonia: $30.5 million
... Camp Lemonier in Djibouti: $28 million
... Training mission in Georgia: $25.1 million
... Camp Stronghold Freedom in Uzbekistan: $22.1 million

US Vice-President Dick Cheney, Halliburton's Former CEO

... In 2001 and 2002 Cheney earned twice as much in deferred salary from Halliburton from his previous job as chief executive officer of Halliburton -- $183,000 each year
... He also owns 433,000 unexercised Halliburton stock options at the end of 2002, worth more than $10 million dollars

Halliburton's Pre- and Post- Iraq War Profits

... Halliburton's net profit for the second quarter of 2003: $26 million
... Halliburton net loss the second quarter of 2002: $498 million

In December 2003, the United States Army found Halliburton of overcharging the government by $61 million for fuel transportation and $67 million for food services. The company charged as much as three dollars a gallon for gasoline that local companies were importing for under a dollar.

Brown and Root has been also been investigated for over billing the government in its domestic operations. In February 2002, Brown and Root paid out $2 million to settle a suit with the Justice Department that alleged the company defrauded the government during the mid-1990s closure of

Fort 
Ord
in
Monterey, California, by fraudulently inflated project costs by misrepresenting the quantities, quality, and types of materials required for 224 projects.

A Government Accounting Office study showed that a Brown and Root operation in

Bosnia
estimated at $191.6 million when presented to Congress in 1996 had ballooned to $461.5 million a year later. Examples of overspending by contractors include flying plywood from the
United States
to the Balkans at $85.98 a sheet.

 

 

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