Banking, Finance & Services

As New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer charges American International Group (AIG) executives with collusion in an insurance brokerage kickback scandal, a paper trail stretching back a decade reveals that AIG used offshore shell companies to skirt the law.
KPMG, the accounting firm under investigation for selling questionable tax shelters, will pay $456 million and accept an outside monitor of its operations under terms of an agreement with prosecutors that heads off an indictment of the firm, people briefed on the deal said yesterday.
American Insurance Group (AIG), the world's largest insurance company, considered suing the U.S. government over the terms of a massive $182 billion bailout that rescued it from almost certain bankruptcy.
In the face of criticism over its controversial construction projects, Bechtel has taken media manipulation to the next level, employing a three-pronged approach to weaving a rosy story for the public and investors.
Maurice R. Greenberg, a former titan of the insurance industry who is at the center of a wide-ranging investigation into possible financial manipulation, will not answer regulators' questions today, his lawyer said yesterday.
BlackRock and Two Sigma Investments - both major hedge funds - have been conducting regular private surveys of brokers for wealthy clients. The practice has raised red flags because of Morgan Stanley's role in the Facebook stock market flotation, as well as insider trading scandals at Goldman Sachs.
Investment Technology Group (ITG), a U.S. stock broker, paid a $20.3 million fine for running a secret operation named Project Omega to take advantage of "dark pools" trading orders made by its clients. Experts say that Barclays and Credit Suisse may also soon pay fines for dark pools trading scams.
The world of global accounting is girding up for a trans-Atlantic battle.
Mahmoud Karzai, brother to the Afghan president and Abdul Hasin Fahim, brother to the vice-president, are the real symbols of corruption in Afghanistan. Kabul Bank has helped finance their shady deals and contracts with the U.S. military
David Tepper, the founder of New Jersey-based Appaloosa Management, was the world's highest earning hedge fund manager for the second year in a row, according to the Rich List published earlier this month. Tepper earned $3.5 billion in 2012, a major increase on his $2.2 billion take home income in 2012.