Bribery, Fraud & Tax Evasion

Former newspaper mogul Conrad Black, already accused of fraud, was indicted by federal prosecutors Thursday on additional charges including racketeering and obstruction of justice. He now faces a maximum prison sentence of 95 years if convicted.
A key witness has admitted under oath that he lied on behalf of Chevron, the California oil multinational, when the company sued to overturn a $9.5 billion verdict for pollution of the Ecuadorian Amazon.
Fresh from settling a lawsuit over last year's fatal explosion at its Texas City oil refinery, BP looks set to become embroiled in a legal battle in Alaska over royalties paid on oil production in Prudhoe Bay.
A contract between a British subsidiary of European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company and Sangcom, the communications arm of the Saudi National Guard, is being investigated after Ian Foxley, a former project manager, blew the whistle.
The recent boom in humanitarian aid has an underbelly largely invisible to charity sector outsiders. "Easy money: the great aid scam," packs a biting critique (Linda Polman, The Sunday Times Online, April 25). In 2006, CorpWatch's "Afghanistan, Inc.", cited by Polman, drilled down on reconstruction dollars, in what's become known as "Afghaniscam." We bring our report to you again.
European commissioners, the continent's regulators, have been criticised by their own watchdog for refusing to divulge details of meetings they and their staff have held with lobbyists.
HOUSTON/SAN FRANCISCO -- Enron Corp. shareholders on Monday charged some of the biggest players on Wall Street with fraud, saying investment banks and securities firms colluded with Enron executives to bilk investors out of at least $25 billion.
While the nation's economy flounders, business is booming for The GEO Group Inc., a private prison firm paid millions by the U.S. government. Behind the financial success and expansion of the for-profit security company, there are increasing charges of negligence, civil rights violations, abuse and even death.
Gazprom and the Russian government have long had a close relationship, but the revolving door between them is spinning especially fast this year. But Gazprom also epitomizes the risks of state capitalism: waste and inefficiency.
Mahmoud Karzai, brother to the Afghan president and Abdul Hasin Fahim, brother to the vice-president, are the real symbols of corruption in Afghanistan. Kabul Bank has helped finance their shady deals and contracts with the U.S. military