Gender & Health

A court in Nigeria has adjourned a multi-billion dollar lawsuit brought by the government against three major tobacco firms until March.
Chevron's 2008 annual report is a glossy celebration of the company's most profitable year in its history. What Chevron's annual report does not tell its shareholders is the true cost paid for those financial returns, or the global movement gaining voice and strength against the company's abuses. This jointly-produced report documents negative impacts of Chevron's operations around the globe, in stark contrast to the message sent by the company's ubiquitous "Human Energy" advertising campaign.
British oil trader Trafigura has offered to settle a court case brought by 31,000 Africans who say that they were injured in the largest personal injuries class action mounted in an English court. The action resulted from the dumping of 400 tonnes of waste in the Ivory Coast by an oil tanker, the Probo Koala, in 2006 - one of the worst pollution disasters in recent history.
A South Korean court has found "considerable causal relationship" between leukemia that killed a Samsung worker and her job dipping wafers in chemicals at a memory chip factory in Gi-heung, South Korea. This is the third time courts have supported alleged victims of workplace hazards in Samsung facilities.
In its rush to re-create the industrial revolution that made the West rich, China has absorbed most of the major industries that once made the West dirty.
A state geologist said Thursday afternoon Rio Cinto Mining Co., also known as Sohio Western Mining, is planning to drill two water wells and sample 11 vent shafts at a former uranium mining site north of the Pueblo of Laguna.
The Consumers International lobby group accused drugmakers of using the methods to get doctors to prescribe products and persuade consumers they need them.
Welcome to the Coke side of life. Africa's planned legal action is just the latest in a litany of alleged human rights and environmental abuses in developing markets that has made Coca-Cola a cause celebre.
A major drug company is blocking access to a medicine that is cheaply and effectively saving thousands of people from going blind because it wants to launch a more expensive product on the market.
Why don't drug companies invest enough money in treating malaria and tuberculosis? A recent study published in the Lancet magazine estimates that 1,238,000 people died from malaria in 2010. Surely a wonder drug that stops these diseases would be wildly profitable?