Multilateral Banks

Betty Kavila is one of the 25,783 civil servants who are to be retrenched in October as a condition set by the World Bank and International Monetary Fund to resume lending to Kenya.
OLEY, PA -- Who really rules the world now? Is it governments or a handful of huge, multinational companies? The wealth of American car giant Ford is worth more than the economy of South Africa. A handful of hugely rich men, like Bill Gates, have a wealth greater than most of Africa. Is there now an alliance between the superpowers of wealth, politics and military might? THE NEW RULERS OF THE WORLD -- A Special Report by John Pilger takes the viewer behind the hype of the new 'global' economy, where the divisions between rich and poor have never been greater.
A pipeline crossing the Peruvian Amazon has spilled natural gas liquids four times since it opened 15 months ago because it was shoddily built by unqualified welders using corroded pipes left from other jobs, according to a new technical report by the nonprofit environmental consultancy E-Tech International based in San Diego.
Friends of the Earth today confirmed they would not participate in planned demonstrations during meetings of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund later this month in light of recent terrorist attacks on The United States.
Taking a break from spraying his neat, one-hectare plot of young cotton plants with herbicide, Moses Mabika surveys the land that has been supporting his family for 45 years. He may not realise it, but he is standing at the epicenter of a heated debate about growing genetically modified (GM) crops in Africa.
Almost none of the huge amount of money "loaned" to Greece has actually gone there, writes Joseph Stiglitz, former World Bank chief economist. CorpWatch's EuroZone Profiteers report sheds light on how some of it was used to pay off bad loans made by private-sector banks in France and Germany.
DOMKHEDI, INDIA -- Each day, Bhola Mundya Vasave and his sons till the soil that has been in their family for 12 generations.
The International Monetary Fund and the World Bank announced Monday that they had canceled this year's annual meetings, saying security agents need time to focus on issues raised by last week's terrorist attacks.
The U.S. administration's backing of a $30 billion loan package arranged for Brazil by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) marks an abrupt change in President George W. Bush's policy of not bailing out developing countries, and its impact may be seen in the results of October elections in the hemisphere's biggest country.
A World Bank official admitted Wednesday the institution's policies in Zimbabwe had failed, ironically blaming the failure on the government's willingness to follow its instructions as ''per book''.