Privatization & Procurement

Larry Keuhn, the former head of British Columbia Teachers' Federation, looks at the reshaping of education to fit the needs of global corporations by critiquing a paper prepared by South Korea's Ministry of Labor and the economic integration of the Asia-Pacific region.
On the official Web site of Boeing, the world's largest aerospace company, there is a section devoted to a subsidiary called Jeppesen International Trip Planning, based in San Jose, California. The write-up mentions that the division "offers everything needed for efficient, hassle-free, international flight operations," spanning the globe "from Aachen to Zhengzhou." The paragraph concludes, "Jeppesen has done it all."
What role did senior executives of the Bank of Cyprus and Laiki Bank play in the collapse of Cyprus banking? Billions of euros - mostly invested by Russians and Ukranians attempting to dodge taxes - have been gambled away in the last few years.
CorpWatch joins with Tim Shorrock today, the first journalist to blow the whistle on the privatization of U.S. intelligence, in releasing Spies for Hire.org, a groundbreaking database focusing on the dozens of corporations that provide classified intelligence services to the United States government.
Privatization of water services has had negative consequences in many countries, says the environmental network Friends of the Earth International, which urges global resistance to the commercialization of this essential resource.
With help from some unlikely places, Corrections Corporation of America is hoping to build the largest for-profit private prison in the United States.
President Gloria Arroyo has ordered an investigation into reports that Filipino workers were forced to go to Iraq to work on the U.S. embassy there despite a ban on them traveling there. A report from the watchdog organization CorpWatch said that "other South Asians" were indeed working for First Kuwait Trading and Contracting in Iraq.
In June, short of people to process cases of incompetence and fraud by federal contractors, offic
Underfunded schools, desperate for resources, are increasingly receptive to corporate-sponsored educational materials and programs, and are ever more accepting of the associated commercialism and product promotion. ''We are paying for educational deficits by selling kids to advertisers,'' says Peggy Charren, president of the advocacy group Action for Children's Television