Greenwash & Public Relations

Every spring, activists and investors attend annual general meetings to protest and meet face-to-face with CEOs and corporate boards. The goal is to place their agendas -- on everything from the environment to labor practices -- front and center.
In honor of this Award, World President James ''Bonds'' Wolfensohn will receive a low-interest loan to pay for his upcoming Toxic Tour of World Bank Project sites.
The corporations, which were welcomed to U.N. Headquarters Wednesday by Secretary-General Kofi Annan, are paying big money to be able to say they are supporting the missions of the U.N.
Rio de la Plata is one of the few rivers of the world whose pollution can be seen from space. Making matters worse is the privatized water company Aguas Argentinas, which dumps sewage into the river a few kilometers from where it treats water for drinking.
Philip Morris spends more on image advertising than it does on charity. That's greenwash.
Here is a list of some of the partnerships between the United Nations and corporations.
Three major U.S. medical associations - the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American College of Cardiology - have bowed to pressure from activist doctors to stop accepting corporate donations from Coca-Cola. The campaigners say Coke exerted undue influence over the medical groups.
U.S. corporations gave away $18.15 billion in charitable donations in 2012 - a combination of cash, grants, and in-kind goods - up 12.2 percent in nominal terms over the previous year. A closer look reveals profit motives, notably for pharmaceutical companies and retail chain Wal-Mart.
Fishing communities in the Caribbean island of Trinidad are protesting a $US1.5 billion aluminum smelter that will process raw material from Brazil, Jamaica and Surinam. Cedros Peninsula United, a local organization, says that the factory uses technology that has had serious environmental impacts in countries from China to Iceland and the U.S.
Here is an index of correspondence from March to August 1999 between international human rights, environment and development organizations and the Unitd Nations Development Programme's Administrator.