Healthcare & Pharmaceuticals

In Bayer and the Global Compact, Phillipp Mimkes of the Coalition Against Bayer Dangers looks at Bayer's corporate history and why it may be at odds with the Compact, a partnership between the UN and big business. Here, Mimkes offers a few more reasons.
On the opening day of the RNC, ACT UP members dropped a giant 30 by 75 foot banner from a highly visible location. The activists demand that George W. Bush take a stand against high drug prices that result in the deaths of millions of people with HIV in Africa and worldwide.
The World Health Organization (WHO) has barred a life sciences industry association from participating in setting global standards protecting food and water supplies because its members have a financial stake in the outcome.
With companies eager to tout their "green" credentials to consumers, advertising watchdogs are stepping up efforts to rein in marketers that make false or exaggerated claims.
While 25 million Africans are living with AIDS, Northern pharmaceutical companies and governments are turning their back on the greatest tragedy of our time according to former deputy head of UNICEF.
In the final hectic days before Congress adjourns for the year, lobbyists are swarming around the Capitol, trying to adorn a bill on bioterrorism with all sorts of special-interest provisions.
Bayer doesn't just make aspirin--it's a major producer of chemicals and drugs with a dubious corporate record. So how did it get into a partnership with the UN? A German activist tells how and why.
39 NGOs Denounce 39 Pharmaceutical Transnationals' Legal Action Against the South African Government and the Complaint Against Brazil Lodged by the USA with WTO.
The HRT (Hormone Replacement Therapy) scandal is bigger than most think. It's not just about menopausal women, like me, getting bad information from their physicians and the pharmaceutical industry for over 40 years, while the federal government stood by and did nothing. The scandal is much bigger than that.
Drugmaker Merck & Co.'s research facility in West Point dumped a chemical compound that included cyanide into the sewer system, killing more than 1,000 fish in Wissahickon Creek, federal authorities said Thursday.