Property, Tourism & Transportation

This month's winner is Ford Motor Company. Ford placed this advertisement in the May 1996 issue of Popular Science -- a lovely mirage-like image of a silver car in a field of beautiful, pink and red flowers. Puffy, white clouds and majestic, purple mountains form a dreamy backdrop for Ford's new car. The ad is truly eye-catching.
The analysis by the California Air Resources Board, released Wednesday night, shows that the greatest health dangers related to toxic air emissions stems from diesel trucks traversing the freeways and other roadways around West Oakland and the Port of Oakland.
Staring at potential payouts in the billions of dollars, the U.S. oil industry is maneuvering to escape responsibility for cleaning up after MTBE, the now-banned toxic gasoline additive that has seeped into drinking water across the country.
Volkswagen's subsidiary in Brazil has been accused of providing material support for torture conducted by the military dictatorship during its 21 year reign from 1964 to 1985. Details of the role of the German car manufacturer emerged in the final report of a national Truth Commission issued last month.
A boycott of Israeli products and leisure tourism was launched at the House of Commons last night. A packed meeting heard Members of Parliament Lynn Jones and George Galloway pledge their support for the boycott called by the Palestine Solidarity Campaign and 22 other organisations.
Mexico and Cuba criticized the United States on Monday for demanding that the Sheraton Maria Isabel Hotel here order a group of Cuban officials, who were meeting last week with representatives of American oil companies, to check out of the hotel and leave the premises.
Through a partnership with a smaller, minority-owned company, a sprawling multinational firm whose federal contract for travel trailers was up for rebidding has landed four new deals that could be worth $400 million, federal records show.
About 1,700 locomotive engineers with the Canadian National Railway went on strike early Saturday. The walkout followed a decision by Canadian National to impose a new contract on its workers, including a 500-mile increase in the distance engineers are required to cover each month. The union said that the increased distance would sometimes make engineers work seven-day weeks without overtime.
The war between the world's largest woodchip exporter, Gunns Limited, and the Australian conservation community has been raging for decades. But the company's recent efforts to silence Tasmanian activists through lawsuits could earn them millions and set a very dangerous precedent. ALSO: BlueLinx Buys Illegal Indonesian Timber
Carnival Cruise staff on UK ships are paid $1.20 an hour or $400 a month in basic wages, according to the Guardian newspaper. These workers lose their tips, ie roughly 15 percent of wages, unless they get at least a 92 percent favorable rating from customers.